Companion to Missal-A: Lent-Pentecost

previous . . .

243
Ash Wednesday.
The Seven Penitential Psalms are duplicated from the Breviary, including the Antiphon, Ne reminiscaris.  (Noted Breviary, [417]-[422].)

253
Ant. Exaudi nos Domine
This chant is labelled as an Antiphon on account of its liturgical function; however it takes the form of an Officium, using the Officium Psalm-Tone for its Verse, and including the Gloria Patri.  The flat at ‘misericordia’ may be a later addition.

Ant. Juxta vestibulum (after Joel 2:17.)

254
Ant. Immutemur habitu in cinere (after Joel 2:17 & Esther 13:17.)
In the Graduale Romanum (1908):69 this Antiphon is in Mode I, ending on D. The Sarum version, beginning at ‘jejunemus’ transposes the music a fourth higher. This explains the use of B-flats in the Sarum version, which thus appears to end in transposed Mode I.
The Graduale Romanum (1908): 69 reverses the order of the two preceding antiphons, and adds the Responsory Emendemus in melius.

256
Officium. Misereris omnimum (Sap. 11-24; Ps. 56:2.)

258
Gradual. Miserere mei Deus (Ps. 56: 2, 4.)

259
Tract. Domine non secundum. (Ps. 102:10, alt, 78:8, 9.)
The Sextuplex indicates no Tract on this day.

260
Offertory. Exaltabo te Domine (Ps. 29:2-3.)

This Offertory appears also on the 11th Sunday after Trinity.

261
V. Domine abstraxisti (Ps. 29:4, Old Roman)

262
Communion. Qui meditabitur. (after Ps. 1:2-4.)
This Communion marks the beginning of a series of weekday-Communion chants taken in numerical order from Psalms 1 through 26, Thursdays excepted. (Frere, Graduale Sarisburiense:xiii.)  The series concludes on Friday after Passion Sunday.

263
Thursday after Quinquagesima
‘The Thursday stational Masses were instituted by Gregory II (715-731), and the Services for them probably were compiled then: they are closely connected with the Masses of the Sundays after Trinity.’ (Frere, Graduale Sarisburiense:xiii.)

Officium. Dum clamarem (after Ps. 54:17, 19, 23 (Old Roman), 2-3.)
This Officium is also found on the Tenth Sunday after Trinity.

264
Gradual. Jacta cogitatum (after Ps. 54:23 (Old Roman), after Ps. 54:17-19.)
This Gradual appears also on Tuesday in the Second Week of Lent and on the Third Sunday after Trinity.
This Gradual repeats the texts of the Officium, but reverses their order.

266
Offertory. Ad te Domine (Ps. 24:1-3; 5 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory appears also on the First Sunday in Advent, Wednesday in the Second Week of Lent, and the Tenth Sunday after Trinity.

Secret. Offerimus tibi Domine.

The Roman Missal has “Sacrificiis praesentibus quaesumus’.

267
Communion. Acceptabis sacrificium (Ps. 50:21.)
This Communion appears also on the 10th Sunday after Trinity.

Postcommunion. Concede fidelibus tuis.

The Roman Missal has ‘Coelestis doni benedictione percepta’.

268
Friday after Quinquagesima
Officium. Audivit Dominus (Ps. 29: 11 (Old Roman), 2.)
This Officium is repeated on the following day.

269
Gradual. Unam petii a Domino (Ps. 26:4 (Old Roman).)

This Gradual is repeated on the following day.

270
Tract. Domine non secundum peccata nostra.
This Tract is repeated from Ash Wednesday.

271
Offertory. Domine vivifica me (after Ps. 118:154, 125.)
This Offertory is repeated on the following day with a different Verse.
V. Fac cum servo tuo (Ps. 118:124, 43.)

272
Communion. Servite Domino in timore (Ps. 2:11-12.)
This Communion is repeated on the following day.

Postcommunion.  Tribue nobis quesumus.

The Roman Missal has  ‘Spiritum nobis, Domine’.

Saturday after Quinquagesima
This day does not appear in the Gregorian Sacramentary.  The Officium, Gradual, Offertory and Communion are repeated from the previous day. The Offertory Verse is different.

Prayer.  Adesto Domine supplicationibus.

274
Gradual Unam petii a Domino
GS:34. indicates the Gradual Domine refugium here. In GS:lxv. Frere indicates this as ‘(non Sarum)’. Domine refugium also appears on the 21st Sunday after Trinity.

275
Offertory. Domine vivifica me
This Offertory is repeated from the previous day, with a different Verse.
V. Da michi intellectum (after Ps. 118:73.)

Secret. Prepara nos Domine

The Roman Missal has ‘Suscipe, Domine, sacrificium’.

276
Communion. Servite Domino in timore (Ps. 2: 11-12)

Postcommunion. Celestis vite munere

Over the People. Fac nos quesumus Domine

The Roman Missal has ‘Fideles tui, Deus’.

277
The First Sunday of Lent.
This set of propers uses the text of Psalm 90 throughout.
Officium. Invocavit me (After Ps. 90:15-16; 1 (Old Roman).)

278
Gradual. Angelis suis mandavit de te (Ps. 90:11-12 (Old Roman).)

279
Tract. Qui habitat in adjutorio altissimi (Ps. 90:1-7; 11-16 (Old Roman).)
The division of the final two verses does not follow the regular division of Verses 15 and 16.

283
Offertory. Scapulis suis (Ps. 90:4-5.)

284
Communion. Scapulis suis (Ps. 90:4-5.)

285
Monday after the First Sunday of Lent.
Officium. Sicut oculi servorum (Ps. 122:2-3; 1 (Old Roman).)

286
Gradual. Protector noster (after Ps. 83:10; 9 (Old Roman).)

287
Tract. Domine non secundum peccata nostra.

288
Offertory. Levabo oculos meos (after Ps. 118:18, 26, 73, 33, 15.)
V. Legem pone michi

Secret. Accepta tibi sit Domine

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

289
Communion. Voce mea. (Ps. 3:5, 7)
The Graduale Romanum, 1908:83. has ‘Amen dico vobis (Mat. 25:40, 34), taken from the Gospel of the day.  The Sextuplex indicates ‘Vocem mea’

Postcommunion. Prosint nobis Domine

This Postcommunion is different than the Roman Missal.

290
Tuesday after the First Sunday of Lent
Officium. Domine refugium (Ps. 89:1-2 (part Gallican, part Old Roman).)

291
Gradual. Dirigatur oratio mea (Ps. 140:2.)

292
Offertory. In te speravi Domine (after Ps. 30:15-16; 17-18 (Old Roman).)
V. Illumina faciem tuam

Secret. Presta Domine quesumus : ut dicato

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

293
Communion. Cum invocarem te (Ps. 4:2 (Old Roman).)

294
Wednesday (Ember days)
The Officium, Gradual, Offertory, and Communion are repeated on the following Sunday.

Officium. Reminiscere (Ps. 24:6, 22; 1.)

295
Gradual. Tribulationes cordis mei (Ps. 24:17-18 (Old Roman.)

297
Tract. De necessitatibus (Ps. 24:17-18, 1-4 (Old Roman).)
In the Sextuplex this chant is labelled as a Gradual.

299
Offertory.  Meditabor (after Ps. 118:47-48, 57-58 (Old Roman).)
V. Pars mea Domine
In the Roman Offertoriale (1935):109. the end of ‘Pars’ through to ‘Domine’ appears a fourth lower.  Presumably in one version a clef error was made at some time.

Secret. Intende quesumus Domine

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

300
Communion. Intellige clamorem meum (Ps. 5:2-4.)

Postcommunion. Da quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut reatum

This Postcommunion is different than the Roman Missal.

301
Thursday after the First Sunday in Lent.
Officium. Confessio et pulchritudo (Ps. 95:6, 1 (Old Roman).)

302
Gradual. Custodi me Domine (Ps. 16:8, 2 (Gallican).)

304
Offertory. Immittit angelus Domini (Ps. 33:8, 2.)
V. Benedicam Dominum

305
Communion. Panis quem ego dedero (after John 6:52.)
This Communion also appears on the 14th Sunday after Trinity.

306
Friday (Ember Days)
Officium. De necessitatibus (Ps. 24:17-18. 1 (Old Roman).)

307
Gradual. Salvum fac servum tuum (Ps. 85:2, 6.)

309
Offertory. Benedic anima mea (after Ps. 102:2, 5, 3-4.)
V. Quia Propiciatur.

310
Communion. Erubescant et conturbentur (Ps. 6-11 (Old Roman).)

311
Saturday (Ember days)
Officium. Intret oratio mea (Ps. 87:3, 2 (Old Roman).)

312
Gradual. Propicius esto (Ps. 78:9-10, 9 (Old Roman).)
This Gradual also appears on Thursday in the Second Week of Lent (348), on the Fifth Sunday after Trinity, and on Saturday in the Ember days of September.

313
Gradual. Protector noster (after Ps. 83:10; 9 (Old Roman).)
This Gradual also appears on Monday in the First Week of Lent (286), on the Fourth Sunday after Trinity, and on Saturday in the Ember days of September.

315
Gradual. Convertere Domine (Ps. 89:13, 1 (Old Roman).)

316
Gradual. Salvum fac. (Ps. 27:9, 1 (Old Roman).)
Rather than the Gradual Salvum fac, the Graduale Romanum (1908):90. continues with the Gradual Dirigatur oratio mea, the ‘Hymn’ Benedictus es, as in Advent, and the Tract Laudate Dominum omnes gentes.

317
Tract. Benedictus es. (After Dan. 3:56-66, 71-72, 67-68, 73-88.)
The Graduale Romanum (1908):91. repeats the setting from Advent. In the Sextuplex this is listed under ‘Varia’.

324
Prayer. Deus qui tribus pueris.  This Prayer is repeated from Saturday in the Ember Days of Advent.

Tract. Laudate Dominum omnes gentes (Ps. 116:1-2 (Old Roman).)

326
Offertory. Domine Deus salutis mee (Ps. 87:2-3; 3, 9, 10 (Old Roman).)
V. Inclina aurem tuam
This Offertory appears also (without the Verse but with ‘alleluya’) on Saturday after Pentecost.

327
Communion. Domine Deus meus in te speravi (Ps. 7:2 (Old Roman).)

328
Second Sunday of Lent.
The variants found on this Sunday in the Western Rites are attributable to the earlier status of this Sunday (in the Gregorian Sacramentary) as ‘Die Dominico vacat’. In the Sarum Use the Officium, Gradual, Offertory, and Communion are repeated from Wednesday of the preceding week.

Officium. Reminiscere miserationum (Ps. 24:6, 22; 1.)

329
Gradual. Tribulationes cordis mei (Ps. 24:17-18 (Old Roman.)

330
Tract. Dixit Dominus mulieri (Mat. 15:26-28.)
This Tract is part of the Saint Denis/Corbie tradition, and is also found in manuscripts from pre-conquest Winchester.  (Emma Hormby, ‘Interactions between Brittany and Christ Church, Canterbury in the Tenth Century: the Linenthal Leaf’, in Emma Hormby and David Maw, eds. Essays on the History of English Music in Honour of John A. Caldwell (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2010:54.)  Other traditions including the modern Roman have ‘Confitemini Domino’. The use of ‘Dixit Dominus mulieri’ here follows the lead of the Gospel Lesson, Matthew 15:21. Other traditions repeat the Gospel Lesson from the preceding Saturday.  The Saint Denis/Corbie and Laon traditions also include the Offertory ‘Meditabor’ and the Communion ‘Intellige’.  The use of the Gospels as a text source for the Tract is highly unusual, Tracts typically being based upon Psalms.

331
Offertory. Meditabor in mandatis tuis. (after Ps. 118:47-48 (Old Roman).)
This offertory is repeated (with Alleluya) on Wednesday after Pentecost.

Secret. Ecclesie tue Domine.

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

332
Communion. Intellige clamorem meum (Ps. 5:2-4.)

Postcommunion. Corporis et sanguinis

This Postcommunion is different than the Roman Missal.

333
Monday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium. Redime me Domine (Ps. 25:11-12, 1 (Old Roman).)

334
Gradual. Adjutor meus (Ps. 69:6, 3 (Old Roman).)
V. Confundantur et revereantur

336
Offertory. Benedicam Dominum (Ps. 15:7-8, 1, 5 (Old Roman).)
V. Conserva me Domine

337
Communion. Domine Dominus noster (Ps. 8:2.)

338
Tuesday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium. Tibi dixit cor meum (Ps. 26:8-9, 1 (Old Roman).)

339
Gradual. Jacta cogitatum after Ps. 54:23 (Old Roman), after Ps. 54:17-19.)
This Gradual is repeated from Thursday after Quinquagesima. 264.

340
Offertory. Miserere michi Domine (Ps. 50:3, 5 (Old Roman).)
V. Quoniam iniquitatem meam

341
Communion. Narrabo omnia mirabilia tua (Ps. 9:2-3 (Gallican).)
The only variation in the Old Roman is ‘et psallam’.

Postcommunion. Sit nobis Domine.

This Postcommunion is different than the Roman Missal.

342
Wednesday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium. Ne derelinquas me (Ps. 37:22, 2 (Gallican).)

343
Gradual. Salvum fac populum tuum (Ps. 27:9, 1 (Old Roman).)
This Gradual is repeated from Saturday after the First Sunday of Lent. 316.
‘clamabo’ appears in the Gallican Psalter; ‘clamavi’ in the Old Roman.

345
Offertory. Ad te Domine (Ps. 24:1-3 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory is also found on the First Sunday in Advent, Thursday after Quinquagesima, and the Tenth Sunday after Trinity.

V. Respice in me (Ps. 24:16, 20 (Old Roman).)

346
Communion. Justus Dominus (Ps. 10:8. (Gallican).)

Postcommunion. Prosit nobis Domine

This Postcommunion is different than the Roman Missal.

347
Thursday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium.  Deus in adjutorium (Ps. 69:2-3, 4 (Gallican).)
This Officium is also found on the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.

348
Gradual.  Propicius esto (Ps. 78:9-10, 9 (Old Roman).)
This Gradual is repeated from Saturday after the First Sunday of Lent (312).  It is also found on the Fifth Sunday after Trinity and on Saturday in the Ember Days of September.

350
Offertory.  Precatus est Moyses (After Exod. 32:11-14, 33:17, 34:7-8.)
This Offertory is found on the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, without the Verse.
In the Roman Offertoriale (1935):97. a second Verse, ‘Dixit Moyses’, appears, making this one of the longest Offertories in the repertoire.

V. Dixit Dominus ad Moysen

Secret. Deus qui omnium sacrificiorum

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

Communion.  Qui manducat carnem meam (John 6:56.)
This Communion also appears on the Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity, and in the the Graduale Romanum (1908):293.  on the Ninth Sunday after Trinity.

353
Friday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium. Ego autem cum justicia (Ps. 16:16, 1 (Old Roman).)

354
Gradual.  Ad Dominum dum tribularer (Ps. 119:1-2 (Old Roman).)
This Gradual also appears on the Second Sunday after Trinity.

356
Offertory. Domine in auxilium meum respice (Ps. 39:14-15 (Old Roman).)
V. Avertantur retrorsum

357
Communion. Tu Domine servabis nos (Ps. 11:8.)

358
Saturday after the Second Sunday of Lent
Officium. Lex Domini (Ps. 18:8, 2 (Old Roman).)

360
Gradual. Bonum est confiteri (Ps. 91:2-3.)

362
Offertory. Illumina oculos meos (Ps. 12:4-5, 1-2 (Gallican).)
V. Usquequo Domine

363
Communion. Oportet te fili gaudere

364
The Third Sunday of Lent.
Officium. Oculi mei (Ps. 24:15-16, 1-2.)

365
Gradual. Exurge Domine (Ps. 9:20, 4 (Old Roman).)

366
Tract. Ad te levavi (Ps. 122:1-3 (Old Roman).)

368
Offertory. Justicie Domini (Ps. 18:9, 11-12 (Old roman).)

Secret. Suscipe quesumus Domine

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

369
Communion. Passer invenit sibi. (Ps. 83:4-5 (Old Roman).)
For a discussion of this chant see William Mahrt, ‘Passer invenit: A Communion On A Simile’, Sacred Music 135-1 (Spring 2008): 30.

370
Monday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. In Deo laudabo verbum (Ps. 55:11, 2 (Gallican).)

372
Gradual. Deus vitam meam (Ps. 55:9, 2 (Old Roman).)

373
Offertory. Exaudi Deus orationem meam (Ps. 54:2-4, 9 (Old Roman.)
V. Conturbatus sum

V. Ego autem ad Deum clamavi (Ps. 54:17, 19, 21 (Old Roman).)

374
Communion. Quis dabit ex Syon (Ps. 13:7 (Gallican).)

375
Tuesday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. Ego clamavi (Ps. 16:6, 8, 1 (Gallican).)

376
Gradual. Ab occultis meis (Ps. 18:13-14.

378
Offertory.  Dextera Domini (Ps. 117:16-17, 5-6 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory appears also on the Third Sunday after the Epiphany, and on Maundy Thursday (on both occasions without the Verse).

V. In tribulatione

379
Communion. Domine quis habitavit (Ps. 14:1-2.)

380
Wednesday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. Ego autem in Domino speravi (Ps. 30:7-8, 2 (Gallican).)

381
Gradual. Miserere michi Domine (Ps. 6:3-4 (Old Roman).)

Tract. De necessitatibus.
The Graduale Romanum (1908):113. has ‘Domine non secundum’.

383
Offertory. Domine fac mecum (Ps. 108:21, 2 (Old Roman).)
V. Deus laudem meam

V. Impulsus versatus sum (Ps. 117:13-14 (Old Roman).)

384
Communion. Notas michi fecisti (Ps. 15:10.)

385
Thursday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. Salus Populi. (The Psalm-Verse is from Ps. 77:1.)
This Officium appears also on the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, and in four votive masses.

Oratio. Concede quesumus omnipotens Deus.

In the Roman Missal this day is a Stational Mass at the Basilica of Saints Cosmas and Damian with prayers (except that over the people) that refer to the saints.  The Collect, Secret, and Postcommunion are therefore different.

386
Gradual. Oculi omnium (Ps. 144:15-16 (Old Roman).)
The Old Roman has ‘escam illis’.
This Gradual appears also on Corpus Christi and the Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.

387
Offertory. Si ambulavero (Ps. 137:7 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory appears also on the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity, but without the Verse.

V. In quacunque die (Ps. 137:3 (Old Roman).)

388
Communion. Tu mandasti. (Ps. 118:4-5.)
This Communion appears also on the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity.

Friday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. Fac mecum Domine (Ps. 85:17 (Old Roman), 1 (Gallican).)

391
Gradual. In Deo speravit (Ps. 27:7, 1 (Old roman).)

393
Offertory. Intende voci orationis mee (Ps. 5:3-4, 2.)
V. Verba mea auribus percipe

394
Communion. Qui biberit aquam (after John 4:13-14.)

395
Saturday after the Third Sunday of Lent
Officium. Verba mea auribus percipe (Ps. 5:2-3.)
Due that the brevity of the Psalm-text, the mediation is omitted.
The Graduale Romanum 1908 has a different Psalm, ‘Quoniam ad te orabo’.

398
Gradual. Si ambulem (Ps. 22:3-4 (Old Roman).)

399
Offertory. Gressus meos (Ps. 118:133, 130.)
V. Declaratio sermonum tuorum

Secret. Efficiatur hec hostia

This Secret is different than the Roman Missal.

400
Communion. Nemo te condemnavit mulier (after John 8:10-11.)

402
The Fourth Sunday of Lent
This Sunday is called the Sunday in the middle of Lent, because it marks the beginning of the fourth week of the six-week period.

Officium. Letare Hierusalem (after Isaiah 66:10-11, Ps. 121:1.)

403
Gradual. Letatus sum (Ps. 121:1, 7.)

404
Tract. Qui confidunt in Domino (Ps. 124:1-2.)

405
Offertory. Laudate Dominum (after Ps. 134:3, 6 (Old Roman).)

406

Secret. Annue nobis quesumus Domine.
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, Sacrificiis presentibus Domine.

Communion. Hierusalem que edificatur (Ps. 121:3-4.)

408
Monday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Deus in nomine tuo. (Ps. 53:3-5 (Gallican).)

Prayer
Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus
This prayer is repeated on Friday in the Ember Days of September.

409
Gradual. Esto michi in Deum protectorem (Ps. 30:3, 2 (Old Roman.)

411
Offertory.  Jubilate Deo omnis terra (Ps. 99:2-3 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory appears also on the First Sunday after the Octave of the Epiphany, but without the Verse.

V. Ipse fecit nos

412
Secret. Tuis Domine quesumus operare.
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, Oblatum tibi Domine.

Communion. Ab occultis meis (Ps. 18:13-14 (Old Roman.)

Postcommunion. Quos divinis Domine reficis
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, Sumptis Domine salutaribus sacramentis.

413
Tuesday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Exaudi Deus orationem meam (Ps. 4:2-4 (Old Roman.)

414
Gradual. Exurge Domine. (after Ps. 43:26, 2 (Old Roman).)
It is interesting to note that in the Gradule Romanum 1908:122. this chant appears a tone higher, in Mode III, except for the passage at ‘nos’ which is at the same pitch.

416
Offertory. Expectans expectavi (Ps. 39:2-4 (Old Roman).)
The order of the text may imply an abbreviated repetition, beginning at ‘et imisit’ (as appears in Ott’s Offertoriale 1935:104).

V. Statuit supra petram

417
Secret. Fidelium tuorum Domine
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, Hec hostia Domine.

Communion. Letabimur in salutari tuo (Ps. 19:6 (Old Roman).)

Postcommunion.  Prosit nobis quesumus Domine
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, Hujus nos Domine perceptio.

418
Wednesday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Dum sancrtificatus fuero (adapted from Ezech. 36:23-26.)
This Officium relates directly to the Reading from Ezechiel.

419
Gradual. Venite filii audite me (Ps. 33:12, 4 (Gallican).)

420
Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus
This Prayer is repeated the following day.

Gradual. Beata gens (Ps. 32:12, 6 (Old Roman).)

Tract. De necessitatibus.
The Graduale Romanum (1908):113. has ‘Domine non secundum’. (as on the previous Wednesday).

423
Offertory. Benedicite gentes (Ps. 65:8-9, 20, 1-2 (Old Roman).)
V. Jubilate Deo omnis terra

424
Communion. Lutum fecit ex sputo Dominus (after John 9:11.)

425
Thursday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Letetur cor querentium Dominum (Ps. 104:3-4, 1.)

Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus
This Prayer is repeated from the previous day (second Prayer).

427
Gradual. Respice in Domine (after Ps. 73:20-24.)

428
Offertory. Domine ad adjuvandum me festina (after Ps. 39:14-15, 2-3.) (Ps. 69:2.)
This Offertory has an unusual ending on G; in Ott’s Offertoriale (1935):42, the ending is on F, and it is identified as Mode VI. The striking perfect fifths (not found in Ott) and the range are suggestive of Mode I.

V. Expectans expectavi (Ps. 39:2-3.)

429
Communion. Domine memorabor justicie tue (Ps. 70:16-18.)
This Communion also appears on the 16th Sunday after Trinity.

430
Friday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Meditatio cordis mei (Ps. 18:15, 2.)

431
Gradual. Bonum est confidere (Ps. 117:8-9.)

434
Offertory. Populum humilem (Ps. 17:28, 32, 7.)
V. Clamor meus in conspectu ejus

435
Communion. Videns Dominus flentes (after John 9:33, 35, 43, 44.)

436
Saturday after the Fourth Sunday of Lent
Officium. Sitientes venite ad aquas (after Isaiah 55:1; Ps. 77:1.)

437
Gradual. Tibi Domine derelictus est pauper (Ps. 9:35, 22-23 (Old Roman).)

439
Offertory. Factus est Dominus (Ps. 17:3, 38.)
V. Persequar inimicos

440
Communion. Dominus regit me (Ps. 22:1-2.)

441
Passion Sunday

Officium. Judica me (Ps. 42:1-2 (Old Roman); Ps. 42:3 (Gallican).)

442
Gradual. Eripe me Domine (Ps. 142:9-10; Ps. 17:48-49 (Old Roman).)

443
Tract. Sepe expugnaverunt (Ps. 128:1-4.)

445
Offertory. Confitebor tibi (Ps. 9:2 [110:1, 137:1], 118:17, 26 (Gallican).)

446
Communion. Hoc corpus quod pro vobis (after Luke 22:19-20 and I Cor. 11:24-25.)

448
Monday after Passion Sunday
Officium. Miserere michi Domine (Ps. 55:2 (Old Roman); Ps. 55:3 (Gallican).)

449
Gradual. Deus exaudi orationem meam (Ps. 53:4, 3 (Gallican).)

451
Offertory. Domine convertere (Ps. 6:5, 2 (Old Roman).)

Communion. Dominus virtutum ipse est. (Ps. 23:10.)
This Communion Antiphon is unusually melismatic.

452
Tuesday after Passion Sunday
Officium. Expecta Dominum viriliter age (Ps. 26:14; 1 (Gallican).)

454
Gradual. Discerne causam (Ps. 42:1, 3 (Gallican).)

455
Offertory. Sperent in te omnes. (Ps. 9:11-13, 5-6, 9-10 (Old Roman).)

456
Communion. Redime me Deus Israel. (Ps. 24:22 (Old Roman).)

457
Wednesday after Passion Sunday
Officium. Liberator meus (Ps. 17:48-49 (Old Roman), 2-3 (Gallican).)

458
Gradual. Exaltabo te Domine (Ps. 29:2-4 (Old Roman).)

461
Offertory. Eripe me de inimicis meis (Ps. 58:2, 4 (after Gallican).)

462
Communion. Lavabo inter innocentes (Ps. 25:6-7 (Old Roman).)

463
Thursday after Passion Sunday
Officium. Omnia que fecisti nobis (after Dan. 3:31, 9:4-6, 3:42; Ps. 47:2.)

464
Gradual. Tollite hostias (Ps. 95:8-9 (Old Roman); 28:9.)

466
Offertory. Super flumina Babylonis (Ps. 136:1, 7 (Old Roman).)

467
Communion. Memento verbi tui (Ps. 118:49-50 (Old Roman).)

468
Friday after Passion Sunday
The Officium, Gradual, and Communion are repeated on Saturday.

Officium. Miserere michi Domine (Ps. 30:10, 16, 18, 2 (Old Roman).)

469
Gradual. Pacifice loquebantur michi (Ps. 34:20, 54:4, 34:22.).
This Gra Officium. Redime me Domine (Ps. 25:11-12, 1 (Old Roman).)dual is repeated from Saturday after the First Sunday of Lent. 316.
In the Graduale Romanum (1908) the Verse is ‘Vidisti Domine ne sileas’ etc.

471
Offertory. Benedictus es Domine (Ps. 118:12, 121 (Gallican), 42 158 (Old Roman), 84.)

472
Communion. Ne tradideris me Domine (Ps. 26:12 (‘persequéntium’ appears in the Old Roman Psalter; ‘quóniam’ appears in the Gallican Psalter.).)

473
Saturday after Passion Sunday
This day did not have original chants as it was a sabbato vacat. According to Robert Thomas Hampson, Medii aevi Kalendarium II (London:Henry Kent Causton, 1841):347, ‘the pope being on that day occupied in distributing alms, ther In the e was no service at Rome’.

The Officium, Gradual, and Communion are repeated from Friday.

Officium. Miserere michi Domine (Ps. 55:2 (Old Roman); Ps. 55:3 (Gallican).)

474
Gradual. Pacifice loquebantur michi (Ps. 34:20, 54:4, 34:22.).
In the Graduale Romanum (1908) the Verse is ‘Vidisti Domine ne sileas’ etc.

476
Offertory. Recordare quod steterim (Jer. 18:20, Ps. 79:2.)
Nicholas Sandon (TUS-III:vi.) notes that several manuscript sources include the rubric ‘Idem offertorium in choro Sarisburiensis discantari solet.’, suggesting a performance incorporating improvised polyphony.

477
Communion. Ne tradideris me Domine (Ps. 26:12 (‘persequéntium’ appears in the Old Roman Psalter; ‘quóniam’ appears in the Gallican Psalter.).)

478
Palm Sunday

The Sarum Liturgies fotr the blessing of Palms and the Procession are substantially different from those of Rome (and York).

479

Prayer. Exorcizo te creatura florum  This prayer is not merely a blessing, but an exorcism,

‘. . . florum vel frondium . . .’  these words make provision for any suitable vegetation that is available.  While palms and olives would be available in Mediterranean, willow appears to have been commonly used in England.

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus : qui in diluvii effusione.  This prayer makes a symbolic connection between the dove  bearing an olive branch to Noah, and the branches to be blessed.

480

Prayer. Deus cujus Filius pro salute.  This is a prayer for a blessing upon the people.

‘. . . cum rami palmarum occurrerunt . . .’ is a reference to the meeting that occurs at the first station in the procession.

Prayer. Deus qui dispersa congregas.  This prayer appears in the Roman liturgy.  It suggests that the people will take the blessed branches to their homes as a protection throughout the coming year.  (It is a general custom to burn branches saved from the previous year to create the ashes for Ash Wednesday at the beginning of Lent.)

Prayer. Domine Jesu Christe Fili Dei vivi.  This is the prayer of blessing upon the branches.

481
The Distribution of the Palms.
The Distribution of the Palms and the Procession are properly part of the Processional, not the Missal. However, as the Processional book was created by taking portions of the Berviary and Missal, certain processions and processional elements remained in the Breviary and Missal as well.

Edmund Bishop provides an illuminating discussion of Holy Week observances in “Holy Week Rites of Sarum, Hereford and Rouen Compared.”: Edmund Bishop, Liturgia Historica. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1918.):276-300.

Ant. Pueri Hebreorum tollentes ramos (after Mat. 21:8-9.)

This antiphon appears also at Sext.

This antiphon and the next share both musical and text elements in common.

Ant. Pueri Hebreorum vestimenta prosternebant (after Mat. 21:8-9.)

This antiphon appears also at Terce.

482
Procession to the First Station
At Salisbury Cathedral the procession to the first station is made by exiting the west doorway of the Quire and proceeding through the south transept to the cloister, through the east, south and west sides of the cloister and exiting to the west; then continuing north and east around the outside of the cathedral to the first station to the east of St. Thomas of Canterbury’s Cross, to the north of the church. (In case of inclement weather the procession could remain indoors by continuing from the cloister through to the north aisle of the nave, and on to a station inside the north or north-east transept.)

In the later Sarum Sources, a second procession meets the first procession at the first station: ‘Christ, represented in the consecrated host, is carried in a separate procession to approach the assembled people and clergy at the close of the Gospel reading, just at the words, “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.” There is no trace of the next development until the middle of the fourteenth century. By then the banners and the festive crucifix were reserved and introduced in the second procession with the Host. The result was the dramatic transformation en route of a Lenten penitential procession into a procession of triumph. The final form of the Palm Sunday procession is not met until the sixteenth century in the printed Processionals.’ Terrence Bailey, The Processions of Sarum and the Western Church. Toronto: Pontifical institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1971:72. This second procession evidently moves from the Sanctuary through the north doorway of the Chancel, and exits through a doorway in the North Transept that has since been blocked up.

It is not indicated whether any persons other than those of the chancel take part in the procession. Presumably the ‘onlookers’ would follow the chancel party on its path, but it is again unclear whether the people would re-enter the church as indicated for the chancel party, underneath the ferertory.

In other places the processional route can be adapted to the local circumstances.  Ideally the procession will exit the church on the south side, circle the whole church in a clockwise, and re-enter through the main doorway.  In adverse weather conditions the procession can be held indoors, again following a clockwise route.

Ant. Prima autem azimorum (Mat. 26:17-19.)

483
Ant. Cum appropinquaret Dominus Hierosolymam (after Luke 19:29-38 and Mat. 21:1-9 and Mark 11:9.)

495
Ant. Cum audisset populus (after Mat. 25:1, Joh. 12:15.)

This antiphon and the previous one appear in the pre-1955 Roman Missals.

486
Ant. Ante sex dies solennitatis Pasche
This antiphon and the next share much in common.

487
Ant. Ante sex dies passionis

This antiphon appears in the pre-1955 Roman Missals.

488
First Station
Ant.[?] Hierusalem respice ad orientem (after Baruch 4:36 and 5:5.)
Baruch 5:5 may help to explain why the singer is a boy, and why he stands in an elevated position: ‘Arise, O Jerusalem, and stand on high : and look about towards the east, and behold thy children gathered together . . .’ The pitch of chant is an octave higher than the usual notation for Mode II, perhaps to indicate the high pitch of the voice.
As Terence Bailey notes, the part of the prophet appears to be a late addition to the procession, perhaps stemming from the late fifteenth century. Terrence Bailey, The Processions of Sarum and the Western Church. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1971:74.
This beginning of the Antiphon appears to be based on the melodic pattern of the Antiphon, ‘Hierusalem respice’ (Monday in the First Week of Advent Noted Breviary:108). The phrase ‘Hierusalem oculos’ appears to be based on the melodic pattern of the Antiphon ‘Leva Hierusalem oculos’ (Tuesday in the First week of Advent; Noted Breviary:111).

489
V. En Rex venit (after Mat. 21:5, 4.)

Ant. Salve quem Jesum.

490
Ant.[?] Ecce Salvator venit (after Luke 21:28.)
The first part of the text is the final phrase of the Antiphon ‘Leva Hierusalem’ (Tuesday in the First Week of Advent, Noted Breviary:111).
The ending, ‘levate capite vestra’ continues with the Antiphon ‘Ecce appropinquabit’ below. Compare the Antiphon ‘Levate capite vestra’ (Vigil of Christmas; Noted Breviary:278).

V. Hic est qui de Edom (after Is. 63:1.)

Ant. Salve lux mundi

491
Ant.[?] Ecce appropinquabit (after Luke 21:28.)

V. Hic est ille qui ut agnus

Ant. Salve nostra salus

492
Procession to the Second Station
The procession continues south around the east end of the cathedral. (In inclement weather the procession could continue east along the north aisle, south around the presbytery and west along the south aisle, to the south east or the south transept.)

Ant. Dignus est Domine Deus noster (after Rev. 4:11.)

Ant. Occurunt turbe
This is also sung as the Antiphon to the Magnificat at Second Vespers of Palm Sunday.

It is also found in the Roman Missal.

493
Resp. Dominus Jesus ante sex dies Pasche (after Jo. 12:1, 9-10.)
This is also sung as the 3rd Responsory at Matins of Palm Sunday.

494
Resp. Cogitaverunt autem principes (Jo. 12:10-11, 17.)
This is also sung as the 6th Responsory at Matins of Palm Sunday.

495
Second Station
The second station is on the south side of the cathedral.

Hymn. Gloria laus et honor (based on Mat. 21:1-16, Mark 11:9-10, Luke 19:37-38, John 12:12-13.)
Theodulf, Bishop of Orleans (ca. 760-821).

Tr. J. M. Neale, Medieval Hymns and Sequences: 28, alt.
In the Processionals this is described as an Antiphon, not a Hymn. To be sure, as a refrain it takes the function of an Antiphon, but the text is best understood as a Hymn.
‘This is the only instance of the use of elegiac verse in the hymns of the Church.’ Matthew Britt, The Hymns of the Breviary and Missal (London: Burns, Oates & Washbourne, 1925):140.  It is primarily in hexameters, except for the first line, which is longer.

It is surprising that the Sarum version is so short.  Seven additional verses appear in the Pre-Tridentine Roman Missal; two additional verses appear in the Tridentine Roman Missal.

Additional English versions of this Hymn appear Neale, The Hymnal Noted: #76, The English Hymnal: #621, and Hymns Ancient and Modern Revised: # 598.

Although it is not stated directly, it would seem appropriate that the Choir repeat the refrain before the boys continue with the Verse ‘Israel es tu rex’. This method is indicated in LU:586.

496
Procession to the Third Station
The procession continues into the cloister through the doorway between the south transept and the chapter house, proceeds west along the north side of the cloister, exiting through the doorway at the west side of the cloister, and continuing to the third station immediately in front of the main western portal.

Resp. Collegerunt pontifices (after Jo. 11:47-50, 53.)
It appears that the singing of the Responsory is to be timed in such a way that the Verse will be begun when the procession arrives at the third station.

This responsory appears in the Roman Missal between the lessons that commence the rite.

497
Third Station
Tim Tatton-Brown and John Crook (Salisbury Cathedral: The Making of a Medieval Masterpiece, London: Scala, 2009, 70) suggest that the gallery in the west front of Salisbury Catha href=”http://www.google.ca/url?url=http://media.musicasacra.com/publications/sacredmusic/pdf/sm135-1.pdfedral was “almost certainly used by the singers for the Palm Sunday liturgy”.  However the rubrics in the 1513 Missal give no indication of singers in an elevated place for the third station in front of the West Door.  Rather, the indication for singers to perform from an elevated location is at the second station, on the south-east side of the cathedral, somewhere near the Treasury/Muniment Room and the Chapter House.  the roof of the Muniment room would seem to be a possible location, but there is no obvious mean of access.  In contrast, there appears to be a stairway leading from the vestibule of the Chapter House to the roof of the same, and so the roof of the Chapter House appears to be the best choice for the elevated location of the second station.

498
Procession to the Fourth Station

Resp. Ingrediente Domino (after John 12:12-13.)
‘Ingrediente’ describes the activity of this part of the procession, as the people ‘enter’ into the Holy City.

Fourth Station
The ‘cross’ refers to the Rood, which is no longer to be found in Salisbury Cathedral. It would most likely have been located at the east side of the central crossing.

Ant. Ave Rex noster (after Rev. 13:8.)
The intoning at successively higher pitches is reminiscent of the ‘Lumen Christi’ at the Easter Vigil.  The salutation is made directly to the unveiled crucifix.

The edition is based on that found in The English Hymnal, Appendix: #3.

Some traditions appear to link ‘et nunc’ to the previous phrase (as interpreted by Warren and Pearson); however the music clearly links it to the following phrase.

500
Entry into the Quire
The chancel party enters the Quire through the west portal and takes their places during the singing of the Responsory ‘Circundederunt me’.  This responsory is repeated from First Vespers.  It returns the focus of the liturgy to the passion.

Following the Versicle and Prayer the Mass begins.

Mass

Officium. Domine ne longe facias (Ps. 21: 20, 22, 2 (Old Roman, except for ‘unicórnium’, which would be ‘unicornuórum’).)

502
Gradual. Tenuisti manum dexteram (Ps. 72:24, 1-3 (Old Roman).)

503
Tract. Deus Deus meus respice in me (Ps. 21:2-9, 18-19, 22, 24, 32 (Old Roman).)
In the Graduale Romanum (1908):156, a new verse begins at ‘In te speravérunt’.

507
The image is of the Arrest of Jesus. The upper portion of the image illustrates Jesus praying in the garden of Gethsemani while Peter James and John wait. In the centre Judas, holding the bag of money, kisses Jesus, while Jesus is admonishing the disciple to put away his sword. Beneath is the servant of the high priest, whose ear has been cut off.
Lanterns indicate that the scene takes place at night.

The Passion of St. Matthew (Mat. 26:1-27:61)
The manuscript and printed missals generally indicate three voices by the standard symbols, c. s. and +, or a. m. and b. (altus, medius, bassus; high, medium, low).  (See David Hiley, Western Plainchant: A Handbook (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993):56 for a concise description of these ‘litterae significativae’.) The use of five voices or reciting pitches, as given in the printed Graduals, presents challenges.  These issues have been discussed in Frank Harrison, ‘The Eton Choirbook III’, Musica Britannica XII:171; Andrew Hughes, ‘Fifteenth-century Liturgical Music I, Early English Church Music VIII:176; Nick Sandon, The Use of Salisbury (Newton Abbot: Antico Edition, 1986) IV:22-23; and Ross W. Devin, ed, Richard Davy, St. Matthew Passion: Reconstructed from the Eton Choirbook (Middleton, Wisconsin: A-R Editions, 2011):x-xii. Andrew Hughes provides a complete edition of the St. Matthew Passion in the above-mentioned work, beginning on page 84, based on Cambridge, Trinity College MS B ii. 13:28. His edition diverges from that provided here in several places.

The Sarum sources provide no indication that the Passions of Holy Week are sung by more than one person. Although Kurt von Fischer (Grove Music Online, ‘Passion’) suggests that the Sarum Gradual at Parma (Biblioteca Palatina, sezione Musicale 98; c1300) divides the Passion between five singers, the MS in fact indicates five voices (vox) or tones, not necessarily five singers. (See MGG X:Tafel 61, which includes a page from this MS.)  These indications and tones are also found in the printed Sarum Graduals. The presence of the rubric ‘Hic inclinet se diaconus’ at the point of Jesus’ death, would rather suggest a single Deacon as singer.

MGG X:891-894. provides a good indication of how greatly the Sarum Passion Tone differs from those of other western traditions.

The primary version in this edition is that for three voices. The variations provided in the five-voice version appear in a smaller size.

The narrator’s Tone, centered on C (c, m, ii. vox) is the usual Sarum Gospel Tone throughout, except at the text ’emisit spiritum’ (Mat. 27:50), where the conclusion falls by step to A on the final accent.  The words of Christ (+, b, iii. vox) use a Tone centered on low F, in which the metrum is as in the Gospel Tone, but the conclusion falls by step (or by leap) to D on the final accent and any subsequent syllables.  The interrogation is on E until the final syllable, F.  The exclamation of Christ (v. vox), ‘Heloy : heloy : lama  zabathani’ and its translation, ‘Deus meus’ &c. is formed of the ascending semi-tone D-E-flat, replicating the interrogative character in a higher register.  It seems likely that this Tone developed as a more dramatic use of the usual interrogation for Christ.  The highest register, F above middle C (s, a, i. vox) is found at the opening saluation ‘Dominus vobiscum’, and in the remainder of the parts which are not the narrator or Christ.  The Tone seems to be an adaptation of the Tone for Chapters in the Office.  It consists of a metrum on D and a full close on B-flat (a final single-syllable word is sung on E, preceded by D).  The interrogation gesture descends by step to D on the syllable before the final accent, rising to E for the accent itself, and up to F on the final syllable (If the final word is a single syllable, the gesture appears in relation to the preceding accent).  The passage ‘Non in die festo’ (Mat. 26:5) (iv. vox) appears as a transposition of the inflections of the i. vox to low G.  Here it represents the chief priests and the ancients of the people, as well as Judas.  This ‘first’ voice is given to the disciples (Mat. 26:8) and to the crowd (Mat. 27:47).  We may hence consider first that the iv. vox developed out of the i. vox by transposition (as did v. vox from iii. vox) to provide greater distinction among the roles, and second that the iv. vox should be used throughout for the parts of the priest, scribes, and pharisees, and Judas.

The edition applies the above principles to fully realize the Passion texts.  A simpler version, according to the Missal texts and omitting iv. and v. voices, is also provided.

It comes as a surprise that the ‘Dominus vobiscum’ employs the highest, prima vox, rather than the middle-register secunda vox, the voice of the narrator. It may be that this intial employment of prima vox serves the practical purpose of establishing the proper tessitura for the singer.

The modern (1962) Roman reading of the Passion begins at Matthew 26:36, although the Tridentine and earlier versions begin at Verse 1 as in the Sarum version. The change was instituted under Pope Pius XII in the Reform of the Holy Week liturgies, 1955-56. The Novus Ordo begins at Matthew 26:14.  The Novus Ordo places the synoptic Gospels, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, in a three-year cycle on this day.

509
Nat. 26:5. ‘Ne forte tumultus . . .’  In non-Sarum sources this is taken as a continuation of the speech of the priests and ancients of the people.

520
Mat. 26:49. ‘Ave Rabbi.’  In  some sources this is set as a question.

521

Mat. 26:55.  ‘Tanquam ad latronem .  . .’  In KJV this is set as a question.

523
Mat. 26:63. ‘Adjuro te . . . ‘  In some Sarum sources this appears as a question.

529
Mat. 27:8. ‘Acheldemach, hoc est’ does not appear in KJV.

531
Mat. 27:16. ‘Qui propter . . . carcerem’. does not appear in here the Vulgate.  It is taken from Luke 23:25.

536
Mat. 27:40. KJV omits ‘Dei’ (‘of God’).

537
Mat. 27:42. ‘Alios salvos . . . ‘  This is not a question in KJV.

Mat. 27:46.  ‘Heloy’ could be set as three syllables, E.E.F.  It appears with only two notes in the 1508 Antiphonale.

542
Offertory. Improperium (Ps. 68:21-22 (The Old Roman Psalter has ‘simul mecum’; ‘consolantem me quesivi et non inveni’ is from the Old Roman Psalter).)

543
Communion. Pater, si non potest (Mat. 26:42.)

550
Monday of Holy Week
Officium. Judica Domine nocentes me (Ps. 34:1-3 (Gallican).)

551
Gradual. Exurge Domine et intende (Ps. 34:23, 3 (mixture of Gallican and Old Roman.)

554
Offertory. Eripe me de inimicis meis (Ps. 142:9-10, 1-2 (Gallican).) (‘judicio’ as appears in Carolus Ott, Offertoriale (1935):51, is found in the Old Roman Psalter.)

555
Communion. Erubescant et revereantur (Ps. 34:26 (Old Roman).)

556
Tuesday of Holy Week
The image of Christ carrying the Cross bears considerable similarities to the celebrated woodcut by Albrect Durer, but omits the figure of Veronica.

Officium. Nos autem gloriari oportet (after Gal. 6:14; Ps. 66:2 (Gallican).)
This Officium is repeated on Maundy Thursday.

558
Gradual. Ego autem dum michi molesti essent (Ps. 34:13; 1 (‘dum’ is from the Old Roman Psalter; ‘convertetur’ is from the Gallican Psalter.).)

559
The Passion According to Mark (Mark 14:1-15:41)

The modern (1962) Roman reading begins at Mark 14:32, although the Tridentine and earlier versions begin at Verse 1 as in the Sarum version. The change was instituted under Pope Pius XII in the Reform of the Holy Week liturgies, 1955-56. The Novus Ordo begins at Mark 14:1.

Mark 14:1. ‘Jesus’ does not appear in the biblical versions, Vulgate, D-R, or KJV.

564
Mark 14:19. ‘Nunquid ego?’ is repeated in KJV.

568
Mark 14:40 ‘Erant enim . . . gravati’ appears in parentheses in Vulgate, D-R, and KJV.

570
Mark 14:45. Vulgate has ‘Ave Rabbi’; KJV has ‘Master, Master’.

571
Mark 14:53.  KJV reverses the order: ‘elders and scribes’.

574
Mark 14:61. KJV omits ‘God’.

575
Mark 14:67.  In KJV ‘Et tu . . . ‘ is not a question.

576
Mark 14:68. In the Vulgate, D-R, and KJV, ‘quia hic ex illis est’ is spoken directly by the maidservant.

Mark 14:70: KJV adds ‘and thy speech agreeth thereto.’

577
Mark 15:3: KJV adds ‘but he answered them nothing.’

580
Mark 15:18 KJV omits ‘dicentes’ (‘saying’).

585
Mark 15:41. KJV has ‘Et cum esset. . . ” in parentheses.

586
Offertory. Custodi me Domine (Ps. 139:5-6 (Gallican).)

587
Communion. Adversum me exercebantur (Ps. 68:13-14.)
The chromatic notes at ‘benepláciti’ are very unusual.

594
Wednesday of Holy Week

The image in the 1508 Gradual is the ‘Ecce homo’.  Christ is depicted beaten, bound, and crowned with thorns, bearing a palm branch in mockery of his status as ‘King of the Jews’. This image became popular in Northern Europe in the fifteenth century.

Officium. In nomine Domini (after Phil. 2:10, 4.)

596
Gradual. Ne avertas faciem tuam (Ps. 68:18, 2-3 (Gallican).)

598
Tract. Domine exaudi orationem meam (Ps. 101:2 (Gallican), 3-5, 14 (Old Roman).)
It will be noted that the Tract, Offertory, and Communion all have texts from Psalm 101.

600
The Passion According to Luke (Luke 22:1-23:49)
The modern (1962) Roman reading begins at Luke 22:39, although the Tridentine and earlier versions begin at Verse 1 as in the Sarum version. The change was instituted under Pope Pius XII in the Reform of the Holy Week liturgies, 1955-56. The Novus Ordo begins at Luke 22:14.

606
Luke 22:31. Whereas the Vulgate repeats the invocation ‘Simon, Simon’, the Sarum text takes the first ‘Symoni’ as the dative.

611
Luke 22:52: ‘Quasi ad latronem . . .’ appears as a question in the Vulgate, D-R, and KJV.

614
Luke 22:66: ‘Si tu es Christus, dic nobis’ appears as a question in KJV.

620
Luke 23:17: ‘Necesse autem . . .’ appears in parentheses in KJV.

Luke 23:19: ‘Qui erat propter seditionem . . .’ appears in parentheses in KJV.

628
Offertory. Domine exaudi orationem meam (Ps. 101:2, 3 (Old Roman).)
The repetition of text (and music) as found in the Verse is very unusual.

629
Communion. Potum meum cum fletu temperabam (Ps. 101:10, 11, 12-14. (‘temperabam’ is from the Old Roman; ‘allisisti’ from the Gallican Psalter).)

635
Maundy Thursday

Reconciliation of Penitents

The Reconciliation of Penitents  has been re-enacted at ‘The Experience of Worship‘.

636
Ant. Venite, venite (Ps. 33:12.)

‘signum faciendo’
Warren (The Sarum Missal I:238.) interprets this to be the Sign of the Cross. It seems, however, that the sign in more likely to be a sign of beckoning.

640
Mass
Officium. Nos autem gloriari oportet (after Gal. 6:14; Ps. 66:2 (Gallican).)
This Officium is repeated from the previous Tuesday.

641
Gloria in excelsis.
The Gloria in excelsis is sung only if the bishop celebrates. Hereford follows Sarum here. The Roman Rite has no such restriction. Nor does the York Use (which indicates here also ‘quod dum canitur classicum pulsetur’). The Rouen Missal 1495 omits the Gloria in excelis altogether here. The Dominican Missal (Venice, 1494) indicates ‘Nullo dicat Gloria’. The Paris Missal (Paris, 1481) has the rubric ‘Gloria in excelsis et Credo non dicuntur nisi ubi chrysma conficitur’. In that it is duty of the bishop to consecrate the chrism or holy oil, the Paris rubric aligns with that of Sarum.

642
Prayer. Deus a quo et Judas proditor
This prayer is repeated on Good Friday.
‘quesumus’ does not appear in the Good Friday version.
The Office has a different prayer from the Mass this day.

Gradual. Christus factus est pro nobis (after Phil. 2:8-9.)

643
Offertory. Dextera Domini fecit virtutem (Ps. 117:16-17 (Old Roman).)
Carolus Ott, Offertoriale (Paris, 1935):25 indicates Verses (In tribulatione, and Impulsus versatus sum) for this Offertory, Verses which end on D, indicating a theoretical finalis on D, not A. Ott labels this Offertory Mode II. on account of the low tessitura of the Verses.

The Roman Missals and Graduals include a Communion Verse, ‘Dominus Jeus postquam cenavit’.

[Consecration of Holy Oils.]
The Consecration of Holy Oils does not appear in the Missals or Graduals. This Office has been edited by Nick Sandon in The Use of Salisbury IV (1996):63-69.

644
Hymn. O Redemptor sume carnem
In the Novus Ordo this Hymn takes the place of the Offertory Chant; the order and selection of Verses is different. (See Graduale Triplex:159.)

Communion. Dominus Jesus postquam cenavit

647
Vespers
On this day vespers begins immediately at the conclusion of the Communion Antiphon. (See also the Noted Breviary, page 1183 ff.)

Ant. Calicem salutaris accipiam (Ps. 115:4.)

648
Ant. Cum his qui oderunt (Ps. 119:7 (Gallican).)

649
Ant. Ab hominibus iniquis (after Ps. 139:1.)

650
Ant. Custodi me a laqueo (Ps. 140:9 (Gallican).)

651
Ant. Considerabam ad dexteram (Ps. 141:5 (Galican).)

Ant. Cenantibus autem accepit Jesus panem

The Washing of the Altars
All of the altars in the church are washed, beginning with the high altar.

During the washing of each altar, a Responsory is sung, drawn from Matins of Maundy Thursday. The final Responsory to be sung is that for First Vespers of Passion Sunday.
At the end of each Responsory the Priest says the Versicle and Prayer of the Saint(s) to whom the altar is dedicated.

653
The Washing of Feet
The Antiphons that follow are unusual in that they are sung in full at the beginning and also after every verse of their Psalms. The Psalms are unusual in that the intonation is–presumably–used at the beginning of each verse.

Ant. Mandatum novum do vobis (Jo. 13:34.)
The Psalm-tone is unusual in that the mediation is a simple inflection on the final accent, and that the second half begins with an intonation on A.

654
Ant. Diligamus nos invicem (after 1. Joh. 4:7.)

655
Ant. In diebus illis mulier (after Luke 7:37-38.)
This is also sung as the Antiphon to the Magnificat at First Vespers of St. Mary Magdalene.

656
Ant. Maria ergo unxit pedes Jesu (after Jo. 12:3.)

Ant. Post quam surrexit Dominus a cena (after Jo. 13:5, 15.)

657
Ant. Vos vocatis me Magister (Jo. 13:13.)

Ant. Si ego Dominus (after Jo. 13:14.)

658
Ant. Ante diem festum Pasche

Ant. Venit at Petrum

659
‘charitatis potum’ the cup of charity, or loving cup. It appears that a cup of wine was shared amongst the assembly as a symbol of fellowship, after the instruction found in Luke 22:17: ‘And having taken the chalice, he gave thanks, and said: Take, and divide it among you’.

663
Good Friday
The image of the Crucifixion follows the description in John 19:19, 24-30. The letters I.N.R.I. on the Cross represent ‘Jesus Nazarenus Rex Judeorum’. The penitent thief on the left looks towards Christ, while the impenitent thief on the right turns away. St. John is seen on the far left, beside St. Mary, Jesus’ mother. Mary of Cleophas and Mary Magdalene are in the background. On the right the sponge of vinegar is being offered to Jesus. Below, soliders are casting lots for Jesus’ garments.

664
Tract. Domine audivi auditum tuum (based on Hab. 3:2-3 [Warren, Sarum Missal-I:252.].)
In the Sextuplex this is listed as a Gradual.

666
Prayer. Deus a quo et Judas.
This Prayer is repeated from Maundy Thursday.
The Office has a different prayer from the Mass this day.

667
Tract. Eripe me Domine (Ps. 139:2-10, 14 (Old Roman except for Verse 6, which has the Gallican ‘laqueum.).)

670
Passion of St. John
While the Passion of St. John may be thought properly to begin at Chapter 13, the ‘last supper’, this reading begins at Chapter 18. Beginning at Chapter 13 would make the reading inordinately lengthy; beginning at the betrayal is a logical continuation from the events of Maundy Thursday.

676
John 18:26: ‘cognatus ejus . . .’ appears in parentheses in D-R.

681
John 19:5: ‘Exivit ergo Jesus . . .’ appears in parentheses in D-R.
The Vulgate and D-R omit ‘Pylatus’.

687
John 19:23: ‘et fecerunt quattuor partes . . .’ appears in parentheses in the Vulgate and D-R.

689
John 19:31: ‘quoniam parasceve erat’ appears in parentheses in the Vulgate and D-R.

695
[The Improperia or Reproaches.] This is also found in the Sarum Processionals.

Verse. Popule meus (after Mich. 6:3.)
In the Graduale Romanum (1908) the beginning of a new verse is indicated at ‘quia eduxi te.’ The Graduale Romanum has B-flats.

Agyos o theos. Sanctus Deus.
This is known as the Trisagion.

696
Verse. Quia eduxit te (after Jer. 2:21.)
The Graduale Romanum (1908:183) has ‘satis optimam’.

697
Verse. Quid ultra (after Is. 5:2, 40.)
The Graduale Romanum (1908:183) has ‘vineam meam speciosissimam’.

Ant. Ecce lignum crucis

698
Ant. Crucem tuam adoramus
The Graduale Romanum (1908:187) has ‘propter lignum’.

699
Hymn. Crux fidelis inter omnes
Venantius Fortunatus (530-609).
In normal order, this Hymn begins ‘Pange lingua gloriosi’. The Verse ‘Crux fidelis’, which is normally one of the later Verses, has been selected to act as a refrain.
It would seem best if the Choir were to repeat the Verse ‘Crux fidelis’ before the soloists continue with the Verse ‘Pange lingua’.

703
Ant. Dum fabricator mundi

706
The Deposition Ceremony

Resp. Estimatus sum
This is also sung as the 8th Responsory of Matins of Holy Saturday.

707
Resp. Sepulto Domino
This is also sung as the 1st Responsory of Matins of Holy Saturday.

708
Ant. In pace in idipsum (Ps. 4:9 (Gallican).)
This is also sung as the 1st Antiphon of Matins of Holy Saturday. It will be noted that in the Antiphonal the Choir joins at ‘in idipsum’.

Ant. In pace factus est (after Ps. 75:3.)
This is also sung as the 8th Antiphon of Matins of Holy Saturday.

Ant. Caro mea (Ps. 15:9.)
This is also sung as the 3rd Antiphon of Matins of Holy Saturday.

715
Saturday: Vigil of Easter

This ceremony takes place in the afternoon. Commentary on the Procession to the Font and the Blessing of the New Fire appears in the Companion to the Processional.

Lighting the Paschal Candle
Warren I:272. indicates that the Paschal Candle is to be extinguished after Compline, but the text clearly indicates before (ante). This is confirmed by the following rubric that indicates that the Paschal Candle is to be lit only during Matins(-Lauds), Mass, and Vespers.

Hymn. Inventor rutili
Text: Aurelius Prudentius Clemens (348-early 5th c.), Liber Cathemerinon V, 1—32; 149—164.
Verses 1-3 trans. Sister M. Clement Eagan. Verses 4-5 trans. A. Harford Pearson, alt.
See AH-50:#31.
The Sarum setting uses only verses 1, 2, 3, 7 and 12 of the text in AH.
In WO F-160 (the only source cited in CANTUS), this Hymn uses Verses 1, 10, 11, and 12; the melody is different.
A translation of Verses 1-3 by Sister M. Clement Eagan appears in The Poems of Prudentius (Washington: Catholic University of America, 1962) (See Bryn Mawr Classical Review 97.4.13.)

. . . dum chorus primum versum prosequatur . . .‘ suggests that after the Clerks sing the first Verse the Choir repeats the same before the Clerks sing the second Verse.

720
Exultet jam angelica

727

It should be noted that incense is placed both in the Paschal Candle (or Candlestick) and also into the small candle or taper (on the Spear).  As Dickinson:341 points out, some Sarum Missals omit the rubric that directs incense to be placed in the small candle.  On the other hand, Divine Service: A Complete Manual of Worship (London: G. J. Palmer, 1878): 320, refers only to placing incense in the small taper.

731

Holy Saturday has no Officium ‘because there is no procession of entrance; the officiating clergy are already at the altar.’, Fortescue, The Mass (1914):223.
Most of the north-western Uses have four lessons (Sarum, Hereford, Dominican, Rouen, and Paris); York has 5 lessons. The Roman Use has 12 lessons.
Amongst the north-western uses, the order of lessons is similar: York, with 5 lessons, has (1) Gen. 1, (2) Ex. 14, (3) Is. 4, (4) Deut. 31, (5) Is. 54. Sarum omits (5); Hereford, Dominican, and Paris omit (4); Rouen omits (3). All of these lessons are included within Rome’s set of 12.
The 1962 Roman Missal has only four lessons, (1), (2), (3) above, plus Dan. 3, the 12th of the older Roman series. The Novus ordo has as many as 7 lessons.
The Westminster Missal has 5 lessons, (1) through (4), plus Bar. 3.

734
Four Tracts are sung at the Easter Vigil–Cantemus, Vinea facta, Attende, and Sicut cervus–whether in the Sarum, York, Hereford, Rouen, or Roman Uses. The Parisian and Dominican Uses omit Attende. These four Tracts are also for the most part repeated at the Vigil of Pentecost. The Sarum, Dominican, and Parisian Uses omit Cantemus at Pentecost, as does the Westminster Missal.

Tract. Cantemus Domino (Exod. 15:1-3, not Vulgate.)

735
Tract. Vinea facta est (after Is. 5:1-3)

737

Tract. Attende celum et loquar (Deut. 32:1-4)

738
Tract. Sicut cervus (Ps. 41:2-4 (Old Roman).)

740
Litany. Rex sanctorum angelorum
AH-50:#183, p. 242. (Attributed doubtfully to Ratpertus, monk of St. Gall, d. after 884.)
Translation © 2014 by Matthew Carver. Used with permission.

‘. . . a metrical Litany dating from around the 10th century. It may have begun in St. Gall, but spread quickly throughout the bishoprics of Germany before being approved for church use by Pope Nicholas III. The original is a sort of abbreviated (or sevenfold) litany which also included in some places a variable stanza to a certain local patron saint (such as St. Gall). This Litany was associated with the seven penitential psalms, after which it was sung. Since this usually happened on a vigil, and the Vigils of Easter and Pentecost included the blessing of the font, stanzas 6, 7, and 8 are sung on such occasions where baptizands are present.’ Mattew Carver, Hymnoglypt, April 19, 2014.

744
Alleluya. Confitemini Domino (Ps. 105:1; 106:1; 117:1.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this Alleluya appears a fourth lower. Walter Frere, Graduale Sarisburiense: 71. labels the chant as Mode V. This is a reasonable assertion, if we consider the chant to be transposed from F; indeed such an assertion would explain the need for transposition in order to notate the ‘sub-tonic’, B-flat. There seems to be no other reason why this piece is transposed to C in the Sarum sources.
It is of note that the neuma is omitted in the repetition, seeing that no sequence follows.  However a tract does follow directly.

745
Tract. Laudate Dominum omnes gentes (Ps. 116: 1-2 (Old Roman).)

746
Secret. Suscipe quesumus Domine preces
This Secret is repeated on Easter Day and on Sunday in the Octave of Easter.

747
Prayer. Spiritum [in] nobis Domine
This Prayer is repeated as the Postcommunion on Easter Day.

748
Easter Day
The image of the resurrection portrays the dumbfounded guards in the foreground and the Marys in the backgbround.

(The Procession and Mass on Easter Day has been edited by Terence Bailey in W Thomas Marrocco and Nicholas Sandon, eds., The Oxford Anthology of Medieval Music (London: Oxford University Press, 1977): 22-47.)

The sprinkling of blessed water
This belongs more properly, and is found more fully presented, in the Processional.

Vidi aquam (after Ezech. 47:1-2, 9; Ps. 117:1.)

750
Officium. Resurrexi (Ps. 138: 18, 5, 6, 1, 2 (Old Roman).)
The block capital, from the 1513 Missal, illustrates the risen Christ and the dumbfounded guards.

Prayer. Deus qui hodierna die per unigenitum
This prayer appears also on Sunday in the octave of Easter
This prayer, in the form ‘Deus qui per unigenitum’ is used for Memorials of Easter.

751
Gradual. Haec dies. Confitemini. (Ps. 117:24, 1 (Old Roman).)
The Antiphon is not repeated at the end of the Gradual.
Throughout the week this Gradual Antiphon is repeated, using a different verse each day. The Gradual and Alleluya (see below) are also repeated after the psalms and before the Magnificat at Vespers each day of this week.

752
Alleluya V. Pascha nostrum, V. Epulemur (I Cor. 5:7, 8.)
The presence of two verses in the Graduals and in the older missals would seem to indicate that the older practice was indeed to sing both verses at the mass. (Both Verses are present in all 6 sources (MRBCKS) of the Antiphonarium Missarum Sextuplex.) At some later period–14th-15th century?–the V. Epulemur was dropped from the Mass, but retained at Sarum Vespers. It does not appear in the modern Roman books.

753
Sequence. Fulgens preclara
Anon. See AH-53:#35 (p. 62).
Translation © 2015 Matthew Carver. Used with permission.

This sequence exhibits an extraordinary range extending from G below middle C as high as the second D above middle C! and employs the rarely seen ‘g’ or treble clef.

The Sequences of Easter Week underwent a revision between the earlier sources (such as Rylands-24) and the later sources (such as the printed missals), presumably in the later 14th or 15th centuries. While two new Sequences were added, the duplication of Victime paschali laudes was removed, and the Sequence Jubilans concrepa was deleted. The Sherbrooke Missal, ca. 1310-1320, includes incipits for the later order of sequences.

Older sources Newer sources
Easter Sunday Fulgens preclara Fulgens preclara
Monday Prome casta Zima vetus expurgetur
Tuesday Concinat orbis Prome casta
Wednesday Dic nobis quibus Concinat orbis
Thursday Victime paschali laudes Dic nobis quibus
Friday Jubilans concrepa Victime paschali laudes
Saturday Victime paschali laudes Mane prima sabbati
Sunday in the octave Laudes Salvatori Laudes Salvatori

Frere notes: ‘The alterations are no doubt due to the adoption for Monday of the recently composed ‘Zyma vetus’ of Adam of St. Victor; but it was the Friday Sequence that was ousted, the four preceding ones were merely thrown a day later.’ (Graduale Sarisburiense: xlii.)

Mane prima sabbati is re-used from the Feast of St. Mary Magdalene.

For the text of Jubilans concrepa, see E. Misset and W. H. I Weale, Analecta Liturgia II: Thesaurus Hymnologicus I: Prosae (Bruges and Lille, 1888): #177 (p. 175), and AH-37:23 (p. 30).

The Hereford Use matches the older Sarum Use except that Wednesday and Thursday are reversed; Friday has ‘Psalle lyrica carmina’, and Saturday has ‘Mane prima sabbati’.  The York Use has the same sequences as the newer Sarum Use, but in a different order: ‘Fulgens preclara’, ‘Laudes Salvatori’, ‘Victime paschali’, ‘Concinat orbis’, ‘Prome casta’, ‘Zima vetus’, ‘Dic nobis’, and ‘Mane prima’.

757
Offertory. Terra trmuit. (Ps. 75:9-10 (Old Roman).)

Secret. Suscipe quesumus Domine preces
This Secret is also used on the Vigil of Easter and on Sunday in the Octave of Easter.

758
Communion. Pascha nostrum (I Cor. 5:7, 8.)

Postommunion. Spiritum nobis Domine
This is repeated from the closing prayer of the Easter Vigil.
It is also the basis of the Postcommunion ‘Spiritum in nobis Domine . . . ut quos vino et pane’ for the Votive Mass ‘Ad poscendum sancte caritatis donum’.

760
Monday in Easter Week
Officium. Introduxit vos Dominus (after Exod. 13:5, 9; Ps.105:1 (106:1, 117:1).)
The Roman Missal has Ps. 104:1.

761
Gradual. Haec dies. Dicat nunc Israel. (Ps. 117:24, 2 (Old Roman).)

762
Alleluya. Nonne cor nostrum (after Luke 24:32.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908. Instead, at this place, is Alleluia. Angelus Domini descendit.
‘Nonne cor nostrum’ appears in the York, Hereford, Rouen and Paris Missals.

Sequence. Zima vetus
Adam of St. Victor
Both the 1513 Missal and the 1508 Graduale omit the square-cap ‘Z’. it would appear that ‘Z’, being such a rare letter for the beginning of a word, was not often available in the font.
Trans. J. M. Neale, Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (London: Joseph Masters, 1867): 118. Alt.
A detailed explanation of the symbolism of this Sequence appears in the Neale volume, pp. 122-124.

768
Offertory. Angelus Domini descendit (after Mat. 28:2, 6.)
This Offertory is repeated on the Mass of the First Sunday after Easter.

769
Secret. Paschales hostias immolantes
In most Missals, including the Roman, the Secret is Suscipe quesumus, repeated from Easter Day; however ‘Paschales hostias immolantes’ is also found in the York Missal, although the York version does not include the unique and charming phrase ‘per resurgentem a mortuis’. The Prayer also appears (without ‘per resurgentem . . .’ in Ludovico Antonio Muratorio, ed/, Liturgia Romana vetus tria sacramentaria complectens (Venice, 1748).., Volume 2:745 as a Collect at the Peace on Easter Day in the Missale Gallicanum vetus.

Communion. Surrexit Dominus
Although the transposition of the chant from F to C accommodates the accidental in Mode VI, this music could also have been written in Mode VIII with no accidentals. Interestingly the Graduale Romanum 1908 gives the same transposition even though that version omits the flat.

Postcommunion. Impleatur in nobis
Again the Roman and other missals repeat the Postcommunion of Easter Day, while the York Missal has ‘Impleatur in nobis’, as does the Leofric Missal.

770
Tuesday in Easter Week
Officium. Aqua sapientie potabit (After Eccles. 15:3-4. Ps. 117:1.)
The Roman Missal has Psalm 104:1.
The Graduale Romanum 1908 has ‘potavit’.
The English version of the Roman Missal 1962 gives ‘He’ as the subject: ‘He gave them the water . . .’ The Latin is of course ambiguous, but the Douay-Rheims and King James versions have ‘She’ (Wisdom).

771
Gradual. Hec dies. Dicant nunc qui redempti sunt (Ps. 117:24; 106:2-3 (Old Roman).)

772
Alleluya. Surgens Jesus (after Luke 24:36.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

Sequence. Prome casta concio cantica
Anon. See AH-7:#47 (p. 61).
Translation © 2015 Matthew Carver. Used with permission.

774
Offertory. Intonuit de celo (Ps. 17:14, 16.)
This Offertory is repeated on Monday after Pentecost.

775
Secret. Suscipe Domine preces ecclesie tue
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Suscipe Domine, fidelium preces’. The Sarum Secret also appears in the John Wickham Legg, ed., Missale ad Usum Ecclesie Westmonasteriensis I (London: Harrison and Sons, 1891): 310.

Communion. Si consurrexistis (Col 3:1-2.)

Postcommunion. Sanctificent nos Domine
The Roman Missal has ‘Concede quesumus omnipotens Deus.’ Paris 1481 has ‘Spiritum nobis Domine.’
‘Sanctificent nos Domine’ is also found in the Westminster Missal.
‘Sanctificent nos Domine’ appears as the Postcommunion for the Fifth Sunday in Lent in the Gelasian Sacramentary, and on Palm Sunday in the Ambrosian Sacramentary. It is interesting that in these latter sources the Prayer looks forward to the approaching Paschal Feast, whereas in the Sarum Use it refers to the cointinuing observance of the feast already begun.

776
Wednesday in Easter Week
Officium. Venite benedicti Patris mei (after Mat. 25:34; Ps. 97:1.)
The Roman Missal has Ps. 95:1.
The Rouen Missal 1495 and the York Missals have Ps. 97:1.

Prayer. Deus qui nos resurrectionis

777
Gradual. Haec dies. Dextera Domini. (Ps. 117:24, 16 (Old Roman).)

Alleluya. Surrexit Dominus et occurrens (after Mat. 28:9.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.
It does appear in the Hereford and York Missals.

778
Sequence. Concinat orbis cunctus alleluya.
Anon. See AH-40:21 (p. 39).
Translation © 2015 Matthew Carver. Used with permission.
(A metrical translation by Edward H. Plumptre appears in The Hymnary, 1872, No. 268.)
‘Phlegethon’ (‘flaming’), one of the five rivers in the infernal regions of the underworld.

781
Offertory. Portas celi aperuit (after Ps. 77:23-25.)

782
Seceret. Sacrificia Domine paschalibus
The Roman form is ‘Sacrificia Domine paschalibus gaudiis immolamus : quibus ecclesia tua mirabiliter et pascitur et nutritur.
Rouen, Hereford, and York agree with Sarum here.

Communion. Christus resurgens ex mortuis (Rom. 6:9.)

783
Thursday in Easter Week
Officium. Victricem manum tuam Domine (Wisd. 10:20-21; Ps. 117:1.)

784
Gradual. Hec dies. Lapidem quem reprobaverunt (Ps. 117:24 (Old Roman); 22-23.)
The Gallican Psalter has ‘factum est istud’; the Old Roman has ‘factus est et est mirabilis’.

785
Alleluya. In die resurrectionis mee (after Mat. 28:7.)
In the Roman Missal this chant appears on the first Sunday after Easter.
This chant is found here in the Dominican Missal, 1494, the Hereford Missal, and the Paris Missal.

786
Sequence. Dic nobis quibus
Anon. See AH-7:#61 (p. 73).
Translation © 2015 Matthew Carver. Used with permission.

788
Offert. In die solemnitatis (after Exod. 3:8.)
The tonality of this chant is highly unusual, it has B-natural at the beginning and ending, but B-flat throughout the middle. This accounts for the transposition of the chant to an A finalis. The version in the Graduale Romanum 1908, by comparison, has a finalis on D and does not include the flattened supertonic.

789
Comm. Populus acquisitionis (after I Pet. 2:9.)

790
Friday in Easter Week
Officium. Eduxit eos Dominus (Ps. 77:53, 1.)
Note the similarity of opening between this and the Officium of the following day, ‘Eduxit Dominus populum suum’.

791
Gradual. Hec dies. Benedictus qui venit (Ps. 117:24 (Old Roman); 26-27 (Gallican).)

Alleluya. Dicite in nationibus (after Ps. 95:10 (Gallican).)

792
Sequence. Victime paschali laudes
Anon. (Variously attributed to Wipo of Burgundy, Notker Balbulus, Robert II of France, and Adam of St. Victor.) See AH-54:#7 (p. 12).
Trans. cento, The English Hymnal #130.
This is one of the four sequences that is retained in the Tridentine missals.
The 1544. Roman Missal includes ‘Halleluia’ at the end. The Modern Roman Missal includes ‘Amen. Alleluia.’
The Roman Missal, since 1570, omits ‘e1’ with its reference to the Jews. This of course disturbs the form of the piece. A better choice is to amend the verse if necessary, as “quam deceptorum turbe fallaci”, or “Above the tales of doubt and deceiving.”

The earlier Sequence, Jubilans concrepa, will appear in the Appendix, following Rouen sources.

793
Offertory. Erit vobis hic dies. (after Exod. 12:14.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this chant is in Mode VI: the ending of the final alleluya is transposed down a tone.

794
Communion. Data est michi (Mat. 28:18-19.)
The purpose of the transposition would appear to be to accommodate the flattened supertonic at ‘Spiritussancti’.

795
Postcommunion. Deus qui adoptionis tue
The Roman and other missals have a different Postcommunion, ‘Respice quesumus Domine populum tuum’.
The Westminster Missal has ‘Deus qui adoptionis tue’.

Saturday in Easter Week
Officium. Eduxit Dominus populum suum (Ps. 104:43, 1.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this piece appears in Mode VII. The beginning is transposed up a fifth, but the final alleluias, which are somewhat different, end a third higher.
Note the similarity of opening between this and the Officium of the previous day, ‘Eduxit Dominus in spe’.

797
Alleluya. Hec dies (Ps. 117:24 (Old Roman).)
It will be noted that the Verse begins with the same motive as is used in the Gradual, ‘Hec dies’, however the intervallic structure is different.

Alleluya. Laudate pueri (Ps. 112:1, 2.)
The Verse ‘Sit nomen Domini benedictum’ is not in the Roman Missals. It appears in the Hereford Missal. The Rouen Missal 1495 has a single Verse comprising Ps. 112:1-2.
In the Graduale Romanum (1908) the neuma begins two notes earlier. In the Graduale sacri ordinis praedicatorum (Dominican):217 the neuma begins on the C, five notes earlier. In the Carthusian Gradual (Cartuja San José, 2005):80 the neuma begins one note earlier.

798
Sequence. Mane prima sabbati
Anon. See AH-54:#143 (p. 214).
Trans. Hymn Melodies for the Whole Year (Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, 1896): vi.
This Sequence is also used on the Feast of St. Mary Magdalene (July 22).
Another translation appears in Hymns from the Ancient English Service Books (1882): 112 (#122).
A partial translation by J. M. Neale appears in The Hymnal Noted, #80.

802
Offertory. Benedictus qui venit (Ps. 117:26-27.)

803
Communion. Omnes qui in Christo (Gal 3:27.)

Postcommunion. Redemptionis nostre munere

804
Sunday in the Octave of Easter
This Mass is, as its name suggests, of the Octave of Easter, rather than of the First Sunday after Easter–that is, the Octave of Easter takes precedence over the Sunday. The following Mass, the Mass of the Sunday during the Week, is the Mass for the First Sunday after Easter, but it is only celebrated during the week.
The remaining Sundays until the Ascension also repeat the Mass of the Resurrection, while the ‘Sunday’ Masses of Eastertide are sung only during the week.
This practice of repeating the Easter Mass on Sundays in Eastertide is also found in the Rouen Missal (1495) and the Paris Missal (1481).

Prayer. Deus qui hodierna die
This prayer is repeated from Easter Day.

‘Nulla fiat memoria de dominica.’ Seeing that the Sunday Mass is omitted on account of the celebration of the Octave Day of Easter, a Memorial of the Sunday might have been made; but the Memorial is omitted, presumably on account of the solemnity of the day.

while this Mass is in essence a repeat of that of Easter Day, there are a small number of changes: the Easter Gradual (‘Hec dies’) is omitted; in its place comes ‘Alleluya. Pascha nostrum’, the Alleluya for Easter Day; the second Alleluya is ‘Angelus Domini descendet’, taken from the Mass for the First Sunday after Easter; the Sequence is ‘Laudes Salvatori’.

In Paris Missal 1481 the Mass for the Octave of Easter is all of Easter Day except the Sequence, which is ‘Salve dies dierum’. The Rouen Missal 1495 is essentially the same as Sarum here. The Roman, Dominican, York, and Hereford Uses omit this mass.

Alleluya. Angelus Domini descendit. (Mat. 28:2.)

V. Respondens autem angelus (after Mat. 28:5; John 18:7.)
This Alleluya. is not found in the Sextuplex.
It appears in the 10th c. Antiphonary tonary missal of St. Benigne (Antiphonarium Codex Montpellier) (Paleographie Musicale 51), 123.
In the Roman Missal it is the Alleluia for Easter Monday.
There appears to be irony in that the text ‘Quem quǽritis ? Illi autem dixérunt : Jesum Nazarénum.’, which appears in John 18:7, is there a dialogue between Jesus and his accusers, Judas, the chief priests, and the Pharisees. At the same time this connection affirms that the one sought is the one crucified.

805
Sequence. Laudes Salvatori
Notker of St. Gall
See AH-53:#36, p.65; the melody is called ‘Frigdola’.
Translation © 2015 Matthew Carver. Used with permission.

810
Secret. Suscipe quesumus Domine preces
This Prayer is repeated from the Easter Vigil and from Easter Day.

811
Sunday Mass of the First Week after the Octave of Easter
Officium. Quasi modo (I Pet. 2:2; Ps. 80:2.)

812
Alleluya.  Post dies octo (after John 20:26.)

Alleluya. Angelus Domini descendit
This Alleluya is the same as that of Sunday in the Octave of Easter.

814
Offertory. Angelus Domini descendit (after Mat. 28:2, 6.)
This Offertory is repeated from Monday after Easter.

Communion. Mitte manum tuam (after John 20:25, 27.)

815
Postcommunion. Quesumus Domine Deus noster
This Postcommunion is repeated from Saturday in the Ember Days of Advent.

817
Second Alleluyas on Feasts with Rulers of the Choir

Alleluya. Mane nobiscum (after Luke 24:29.)

818
Alleluya. Oportebat pati Christum (after Luke 24:46, 26.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this is the second Alleluia on the third Sunday after Easter. (This version includes an additional melodic repetition in the jubilus.)
The transposition of the chant and use of accidentals in GS. supports the use of naturals as suggested in the edition.

Alleluya. Christus resurgens (Rom 6:9.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this is the second Alleluia on the fourth Sunday after Easter.

819
Alleluya. Surrexit altissimus (after Acts 5:30.)
This Alleluya Verse is a rhyming couplet.
Although it appears in the Sextuplex, it is not in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

820
Alleluya. Surrexit Christus et illuxit
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this is the first Alleluia on the fifth Sunday after Easter.

Alleluya. Christus mortuus est
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

821
Alleluya. Surgens Jesus
Alleluya. Surrexit Dominus, et occurrens
Alleluya. In die resurrectionis
These three Alleluyas are repeated from Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday in Easter Week.

823
Sunday Mass of the Second Week after the Octave of Easter
Officium. Misericordia Domini (Ps 32:5-6.)
‘Dei’ is not in the Vulgate.

824
Alleluya. Ego sum pastor bonus (after John 10:14.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1508 this text is used for the second Alleluia, but the setting, in Mode I, is completely different.

Alleluya. Surrexit pastor bonus (cf. John 10:11.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

825
Offertory. Deus Deus meus. (Ps. 62:1, 5.)

Communion. Ego sum pastor bonus (after John 10:14.)

829
Sunday Mass of the Third Week after the Octave of Easter
Officium. Jubilate Deo omnis terra (Ps. 65:1-2.)

‘non dicitur ulterius’ is a reminder not to sing the conclusion of the Psalm-verse ‘mentiéntur tibi inimíci tui.’

Prayer. Deus qui errantibus ut in viam
The BCP prayer is similar.

830
Alleluya. Modicum et non videbitis me (after John 16:16.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

831
Alleluya. Iterum autem videbo vos (John 16:22.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

Alleluya. Surrexit Christus qui creavit omnia
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this appears on Thursday of Easter week.

832
Offertory. Lauda anima mea Dominum (Ps. 145:2 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory is repeated on the Sunday after Ascension and on Friday after Pentecost.

833
Communion. Modicum et non videbitis me (after John 16:16.)

Postcommunion. Respice quesumus Domine populum tuum : et quem
This Postcommunion appears in the Roman Missal on Friday of Easter Week, and also appears in that location in the Leofric and Gilbertine Missals.
Here the Roman Missal has ‘Sacramenta, quae sumpsimus’.

836
Sunday Mass of the Fourth Week after the Octave of Easter
Officium. Cantate Domino canticum novum (Ps. 97:1, 2, 1 (Old Roman).)

837
Alleluya. Vado ad eum (John 16:5, 6.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

838
Alleluya. Ego veritatem (John 16:7.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

Alleluya. Surrexit Dominus vere (Luke 24:34.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this appears on Wednesday of Easter week.

839
Offertory. Jubilate Deo universa terra (after Ps. 65:1, 2, 16.)
This Offertory appears also on the Second Sunday after the Octave of the Epiphany.
‘universa terra’ appears in neither the Gallican nor the Old Roman, which have ‘omnis terra’.

Secret. Deus qui resurgens a mortuis
This Secret does not appear in the Roman Missal.
The Prayer ‘Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui resurgens a mortuis’ which appears as a Collect for Peace on Easter Day in the Old Gallican Missal (Mabillon, De Liturgia Gallicana, Vol. III. (Paris, 1729):366). is very similar, adding at the end ‘et gratiam tue pietatis adquirat’. ‘cassata’ appears in place of ‘cessata’.

Communion. Dum venerit Paraclytus (after John 16:8.)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this chant is identified as Mode VIII; the range extends only as high as E.

844
Sunday Mass of the Fifth Week after Easter
Officium. Vocem jocunditatis (after Is. 48:20; Ps. 65:1-2.)
This is one of the few Officia that is not based on a Psalm.

Prayer. Deus a quo bona cuncta procedunt
The BCP Collect is similar.

845
Alleluya. Usque modo non petistis (after John 16:24.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

Alleluya. Surrexit Christus jam non moritur (after Rom. 6:9.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

846
Offertory. Benedicite gentes (Ps. 65:8, 9, 20 (Old Roman).)

847
Communion. Cantate Domino alleluya (Ps. 95:2 (Old Roman).)

849
Monday in Rogationtide
Saint Mamertus (died c. 475), Bishop of Vienne, ‘instituted a penitential procession with public supplications on the Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday before Ascension Day. In 816 Pope Leo III introduced it into Rome, and soon after it became a general observance throughout the [Latin] Church.’ (Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962:645.)

Officium. Exaudivit de templo sancto suo (Ps. 17:7, 2-3 (Gallican).)

850
Alleluya. Confitemini Dominio quoniam bonus (Ps. 117:1.)
The Roman Missal has ‘Alleluia, alleluia. Propitius esto Domine’ and ‘Alleluia. Exsultabo et letabor’.

851
Offertory. Confitebor Domino nimis in ore meo (Ps. 108:30-31.)

852
Communinon. Petite et accipietis (after Luke 11:9-10.)

853
Tuesday in Rogationtide

854
Vigil of the Ascension
The Graduale Romanum 1908 uses the Mass of the fifth Sunday of Easter here.

Officium. Omnes gentes plaudite manibus (Ps. 46:2, 4.)
This Officium is repeated (without ‘Alleluya’) on the seventh Sunday after Trinity (in the Roman Use, the seventh Sunday after Pentecost).
Note that the opening melodic motive is shared with the Offertory.

Oratio. Presta quesumus omnitpotens Pater : ut nostre mentis intentio
This Prayer also appears in the York Use, in the Westminster Missal, in the Paris Breviary (1714), and in the Ambrosian Rite.

855
Alleluya. Omnes gentes plaudite manibus (Ps. 46:2.)
This Alleluya is repeated on the seventh Sunday after Trinity (in the Roman Use, the seventh Sunday after Pentecost).

856
Offertory. Viri Galilei (after Acts 1:11.)
This Offertory does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908, but it does appear in the Graduale Triplex 1979.
Note that the opening melodic motive is shared with the Officium.

857
Secret. Sacrificium Domine pro Filii tui
This Prayer also appears in the York Use, in the Westminster Missal, and in the Ambrosian Rite.

Communion. Pater cum essem (after John 17: 12, 13, 15.)
This Communion is repeated on the Sunday after Ascension.
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this chant appears on Sunday within the Octave of the Ascension.

858
Postcommunion. Tribue quesumus Domine ut per hec
This Prayer also appears in the York Use, in the Westminster MIssal, and in the Ambrosian Rite.

859
Ascension Day
The image might be viewed as the communion of saints (although the church penitent–those in purgatory–is omitted). In the top centre is the Trinity with the Law, surrounded by angels. To the left would be the clergy in heaven, to the right the lay in heaven. Below appears a reflection of the heavenly realm, with the Church in the centre, flanked again by the clergy and laity here on earth. The text is taken from the ‘Te Deum’: beginning in the lower left, ‘Te Deum laudamus te [Dominum confitemur.]’, ‘te eternum Patrem omnis terra v[eneratur]; in the upper portion the text runs clockwisse from the upper left: ‘te gloriousus apostolorum cho[rus]’, ‘te prophetatum laudabilis [numerus]’, ‘te martirum candidatus laud[at exercitus.]’, and ‘te per orbem terrarum sancta [confitetur ecclesia.].’

Officium. Viri Galilei (Acts 1:11; 10.)
The text follows the plan of Matins Responsory 9. This text is also read in the ‘Epistle’.

The Verse loses its effect if the Antiphon is not repeated before the Gloria Patri, as directed by the Sarum rubrics.
The Roman Psalm-Verse is ‘Omnes gentes plaudite’ (Ps. 46:2), from the Psalter, rather than the text from Acts.
The decorated initial portrays a priest saying mass with a woman and man attending.

Prayer. Concede quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut qui hodierna die
The BCP Collect is similar.

861
Alleluya. Ascendit Deus in jubilatione (Ps. 46:6 (Old Roman).)

862
Alleluya. Ascendens Christus in altum (after Eph. 4:8.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908. It appears in the Dominican Gradual 1950.

Alleluya. Dominus in Synai (after Ps. 67:18-19.)

863
Sequence. Rex omnipotens die hodierna
Anon. see AH-7: #72 (p.83.) and AH-53: #66 (p. 111.)
Trans. (Performing Edition) Walter H. Frere, Hymn Melodies for the Whole Year (Hymn Melodies and Sequences) 2nd. ed. (Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, 1903): (VIII). (In Hymn Melodies for the Whole Year the music from ‘O Deus celi’ onwards appears a perfect fourth higher.)
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) Matthew Carver. Translation © 2016 Matthew Carver. Used by permission.

867
Offertory. Ascendit Deus in jubilatione (Ps. 46:5 (Old Roman).)

Communion. Psallite Domino (Ps. 67:33, 34 (Old Roman).)

[Friday in the Octave of the Ascension

The York Use includes the sequences, ‘Sonet vox fidelium’ and ‘Letatur orbis’.]

869
Sunday in the Octave of the Ascension
Officium. Exaudi Domine vocem meam (Ps. 26:7-9, 1 (Old Roman).)

870
Alleluya. Reganbit Dominus super omnes gentes (Ps. 46:9 (Old Roman).)

871
Alleluya. Non vos relinquam orphanos (after John 14:18; 16:22.)

[The Hereford Use include the sequence ‘Rex omnipotens’.]

872
Offertory. Laudabo anima mea (Ps. 145:2 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory is repeated from the Third Sunday after Easter and appears again on Friday after Pentecost.

Secret. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut hanc tibi hostiam
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Sacrificia nos, Domine’.

Communion. Pater cum essem
This Communion is repeated from the Vigil of the Ascension.

Postcommunion. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut per hec sacrosancta
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, ‘Repleti Domine muneribus sacris’.

874
Vigil of Pentecost
The Vigil of Pentecost parallels many aspects of the Easter Vigil: Old Testament prophecies, the Blessing of the Font, and the Litany.
The Vigil of Pentecost was cut in the Roman Missal of 1962.

The vigil of Pentecost has no Officium ‘because there is no procession of entrance; the officiating clergy are already at the altar.’, Fortescue, The Mass (1914):223.

The Northwestern Uses generally have 4 lessons. The York Use has 5 lessons, as does the Westminster Missal. The York series is (1) Gen. 22 (2) Ex. 14, (3) Is. 4, (4) Deut. 31, and (5) Bar. 3. Sarum, Dominican, Paris and Hereford omit (2). Rouen omits (4).

875
Prayer. Deus qui in Abrahe famuli tui
This Prayer also appears in the Leofric Missal (Exeter).

Prayer. Deus qui es glorificatio fidelium
This Prayer also appears in the Leofric Missal (Exeter) as ‘Deus glorificatio fidelium’.

Prayer. Deus qui nos ad celebrandam hanc
This Prayer also appears in the York Missal.

877
Prayer. Deus qui nobis per prophetarum

Prayer. Concede quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut qui sollennitatem doni
This Prayer also appears in the York Missal, in the Leofric Missal (Exeter), and in the Roman (Tridentine) Missal.

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus : qui pascahale sacramentum
In reference to ‘quinquaginta dierum’, Warren, The Sarum Missal I:336. gives the following note: ‘qui Paschale sacramentum quinquaginta dierum voluisti mysterio contlneri. This phrase seems to suggest that Easter-tide extended up to Whitsunday (inclusive). Quinquagesima was sometimes used as a name for Easter-tide.’

878
Prayer. Presta quesumsus ominpotens Deus : ut claritatis tue

879
Offertory. Emitte spiritum tuum (Ps. 103:30-21 (Old Roman).)

880
Secret. Hostias populi tui
This Secret also appears in the Westminster Missal.
The Roman Missal has the Secret ‘Munera quesumus Domine oblata’ (see Pentecost).

Communion. Ultimo festivitatis (John 7:37, 38, 39.)
In the Roman version (LU:861) ‘Ultimo fes-‘ is set one tone higher.

Postcommunion. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut Spiritus Sanctus adveniens
The Roman Missal has the Postcommunion ‘Sancti Spiritus Domine corda nostra’ (see Pentecost).

881
Pentecost
The Image is a traditional protrayal of Pentecost, showing tongues of fire emanating from the Holy Ghost.

Officium. Spiritus Domini replevit orbem terrarum (Wisd. 1:7; Ps. 67:2.)
The decorated initial illustrates tongues of fire emanating from the Holy Ghost.

883
Alleluya. Emitte Spiritum tuum. (Ps. 103:30.)

Alleluya. Spiritussanctus procedens
The Roman Missal has ‘Alleluya. Veni Sancte Spiritus’.

884
Sequence. Sancti Spiritus assit nobis
Notker of St. Gall. See AH-53:#70 (p. 119).
Trans. Christopher MacAvoy. © 2013 by Christopher MacAvoy.  Used with permission.

888
Offertory. Confirma hoc Deus (Ps. 67:28-29.)
This Offertory is repeated on the following Thursday.

Communion. Factus est repente (cf. Acts 2:2, 4, 11.)
This Communion is repeated on the following Thursday.

Sarum Hereford York
Sunday Sancti Spiritus assit Sancti Spiritus assit Sancti Spiritus assit
Monday Resonet sacrata Alma chorus Alma chorus
Tuesday Eia musa Laudes Deo Laudes Deo
Wednesday Laudes Deo lux Veni Spiritus eternorum Resonet sacrata
Thursday Alma chorus Veni Sancte Spiritus Laudes jocunda
Friday Laudes Deo Alma chorus Laudes Deo
Consolator alme
Saturday Alma chorus Laudes Deo Veni Sancte Spiritus

890
Monday after Pentecost
Officium. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti (Ps. 80:17; 2 (Old Roman).)
The decorated capital appears to be St. Michael battling the Dragon.

891
Alleluya. Paraclytus Spiritussanctus (after John 14:26.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

Sequence. Resonet sacrata
AH-7:#78, p. 91; 53:#74, p. 120.
The melody, ‘Paratum cor’ is given in Anselm Hughes, Anglo-French Sequelae: 62.
Translation © 2016 Matthew Carver. Used by permission.

895
Offertory. Intonuit de celo (Ps. 17:14, 16.)
This Offertory also appears on Tuesday after Easter.

Secret. Presta quesumus Domine : ut secundum promissionem
This Secret also appears in the Westminster Missal
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Propitius Domine quaesumus, haec dona’.

896
Communion. Spiritus Sanctus docebit vos (after John 14:26.)

Postcommunion. Plenum in nobis quesumus
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, ‘Adesto quesumus Domine populo tuo’.

Tuesday after Pentecost
Officium. Accipite jocunditatem (after 2 Esdras 2:36, 37; Ps. 77:1.)

897
Alleluya. Veni Sancte Spiritus (text source unknown)
In the Roman Missal this Alleluya is used throughout the week as the second Alleluya.

898
Sequence. Eya musa
Anon. See AH-53:#75 (p. 130), Analecta Liturgica I:#119 (p. 177).
Translation © 2016 Matthew Carver. Used by permission.
The mode and the opening of the melody appear to connect this Sequence with its Alleluya.

901
Offertory. Portas celi aperuit Dominus (Ps. 77:23-25.)
This Offertory is repeated from Wednesday in Easter Week.

Secret. Descendat quesumus Domine Spiritus Sanctus
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Purificet nos quesumus Domine’.

902
Communion. Spiritus qui a Patre (after John 15:26, 16:14.)

Wednesday after Pentecost
Officium. Deus dum egrederis (Ps. 67:8, 2 (Old Roman).)
In the Graduale Romanum 1908 this chant is in Mode III.

903
Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut a nostris mentibus.
This Prayer is to be found in other uses as the Prayer Over the People at Pentecost. In the York Missal it appears on Saturday after Pentecost.
The Roman Missal has at this place the Collect ‘Mentes nostras quesumus Domine’.

In the Roman Missal the first two Lessons are Acts 2:14-21. and Acts 5:12-16.

904
Prayer. Mentes nostras quesumus Domine
The Roman Missal has at this place the Collect ‘Presta quesumus omnipotens et misericors Deus : ut Spiritus Sanctus adveniens’.

Alleluya. Loquebantur variis linguis (after Acts 2:11.)
In the Roman Missal this Alleluya appears on Monday after Pentecost.

Sequence. Lux jocunda lux insignis
Adam of St. Victor. See AH-54:#154 (p. 239).
The translation appears in the Warren and Pearson editions of the Sarum Missal. slightly edited by WR.

909
Offertory. Meditabor in mandatis tuis. (after Ps. 118:47-48 (Old Roman).)
This offertory is also used (without ‘Alleluya’) on the Second Sunday of Lent.

910
Secret. Oblata tibi Domine quesumus munera
This appears also in the Westminster Missal.
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Accipe quesumus Domine munus oblatum’.

Communion. Pacem meam do vobis. After John 14:27.
The Roman Missal 1962 has a varied text, ‘Pacem relinquo vobis, alleluia : pacem meam do vobis, alleluia, alleluia. (following the Vulgate).

Postcommunion. Per hujus Domine virtutem mysterii
This appears also in the Westminster Missal.
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, ‘Sumentes Domine celestia sacramenta’.

911
Thursday after Pentecost
This Mass is based on the Mass for Pentecost, changing only the Prayer, the Epistle, the second Alleluya, the Sequence, the Gospel, the Secret, and the Postcommunion.

Officium. Spiritus Domini replevit
This Officium is repeated from Pentecost.

Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens et misericors Deus : ut Spiritussanctus
The Roman Missal repeats the Prayer from Pentecost.

912
Alleluya. Factus est repente de celo (Acts 2:2.)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908.

913
Sequence. Alma chorus Domini
See AH-53:#87 (p. 152).
the melody is commonly known as ‘Tuba’.

914
Offertory. Confirma hoc Deus
This Offertory is repeated from Pentecost.

Secret. Virtute Sancti Spiritus Domine
The Roman Missal repeats the Secret from Pentecost.

915
Communion. Factus est repente
This Communion is repeated from Pentecost.

Postcommunion. Sacrificiis celestibus quesumus Domine
The Roman Missal repeats the Postcommunion from Pentecost.

Friday after Pentecost
Officium. Repleatur os meum laude tua (Ps. 70:8, 23, 1-2 (Old Roman).)

916
Lesson. Acts 2:22-28.
‘Provideam Dominum coram me . . . cum facie tua.’ Ps. 15: 8-10.

Alleluya. Spiritus Domini replevit orbem terrarum.
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum (1908). The text appears in the Dominican Graduale (Suarez), but with a completely different melody.

917
Sequence. Laus Deo devotas
Anon. See AH-54: # 11 (p. 21)
Trans. in Walter H. Frere, Hymn Melodies for the Whole Year (Hymn Melodies and Sequences) 2nd. ed. (Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, 1903): (x).

919
Offertory. Lauda anima mea Dominum (Ps. 145:2 (Old Roman).)
This Offertory appears also in the Sunday Mass for the Third Week after Easter, and on the Sunday after Ascension.

920
Communion. Spiritus ubi vult spirat (after John 3:7.)

Postcommunion. Concede quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut hujus perceptione
The Roman Missal has a different Postcommunion, ‘Sumpsimus Domine sacri dona mysterii’.

Saturday after Pentecost
Officium. Caritas Dei diffusa est. (after Rom. 5:5; Ps. 87:2.)
The Roman form has ‘nostris’, as does the Vulgate, and ‘nobis’.

925
Prayer. Deus qui tribus pueris mitigasti
This Prayer is repeated from Saturday of the Ember Days of Advent, with the added clause, ‘ut adveniente Spiritu Sancto’.

926
Alleluya. Laudate Dominum (Ps. 116:1 (Old Roman).)
This Alleluya does not appear in the Graduale Romanum 1908. It appears in the Dominican Gradual 1950.

927
Offertory. Domine Deus salutis mee (Ps. 87:2-3 (Old Roman).)
This is a rare instance in which there is a significant divergence amongst forms. The printed graduals have one form of ‘alleluya’; the Graduale Sarisburiense another, and Rylands-24. no ‘alleluya’ at all.
This Offertory appears (without ‘alleluya’) on Saturday of the First Week of Lent.

928
Secret. Mitte Domine quesumus Spiritum Sanctum
The Roman Missal has a different Secret, ‘Ut accepta tibi sint’.

Communion. Non vos relinquam orphanos (after John 14:18; 16:22.)

. . . next