Companion to A: Psalterium

[4]
Dedicatory Epistle of 1519
According to Christopher Wordsworth (The Old Service-Books, 105), the writer, Brian Row, was an Etonian, born at Macclesfield, who passed on to King’s College, Cambridge in 1499. Row gives credit to Dr. [John] Sampson (d. 1519), Vice-Provost of his college, for correcting the Sarum Antiphoner.

[5].
In nomine Domini nostri.
This appears to be the saluation with which the Breviary begins, rather than a part of the liturgy itself.  However, John David Chambers The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer (London: Joseph Masters, 1852), 25, takes it to be part of the Office.  In this case it would be said privately before what follows.

Sign of the Cross.
‘The cross was originally traced by Christians with the thumb or finger on their own foreheads. This practice is attested by numberless allusions in Patristic literature, and it was clearly associated in idea with certain references in Scripture, notably Ezekiel 9:4 (of the mark of the letter Tau); Exodus 17:9-14; and especially Apocalypse 7:3, 9:4 and 14:1.’ Catholic Encyclopedia, ‘Sign of the Cross’ (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13785a.htm). It would seen that the practice of making a larger cross, from forehead to breast, and from shoulder to shoulder, gained momentum through the course of the later middle ages.

Pater noster.
The Pater noster uses the Vetus Latina ‘quotidianum’ rather than the Vulgate ‘supersubstantialem’.

Salutatio angelica.
In most Sarum sources the Ave Maria does not include the second part: ‘Sancta Maria mater Dei . . . ‘  However it is included in the 1531 Breviary. This latter petition apparently first appeared in print in Girolamo Savonarola, Esposizione sopra l’Ave Maria, (1495).
In most versions ‘Christus’ is omitted.
This form of the Ave Maria omits the final word ‘nostre’, which appears to have been a later addition.

[6].
Symbolum apostolorum.
‘inferna’ is in the textus receptus of the Creed and appears in Rufinus’ commentary.  ‘inferos’ is the normal usage today.
Credo in Spiritum, the latter part of Credo in Deum, typically begins a new paragraph.

Psalmus invitatorius. xciv. Venite exultemus Domino.
The text of the Invitatory Psalm follows the Old Roman Psalter, and is thus different from Gallican form which appears in the body of the Psalter.

[7]
 Invitatoria per annum
The Invitatory Antiphons that appear here begin with those used on ordinary Sundays through the year, from after the Octave of Epiphany until Septuagesima, from after the Octave of Easter until the Ascension, and from after Trinity until Advent.  (The Invitatory Antiphons for Sundays in Advent through Epiphany, Septuagesima through Easter, and Ascension through Trinity appear in the Temporale.)  Then follow the Invitatory Antiphons for ferias in Advent and in Eastertide.  (For ferias after the Octave of Epiphany and after Trinity the Psalter provides a different Invitatory Antiphon for each weekday in a series of texts taken from the Venite that continues from the Invitatory for Sundays after Epiphany.)

Invit. Preoccupemus faciem Domini. (Ps 95/xviv. 1b)
This is the ‘default’ Sunday Invitatory Antiphon for ‘ordinary’ time.
In the Nocturnale Romanum:1 the rubric indicates omission from the Psalm of the text of the Antiphon when this Invitatory is sung. There is no such rubric in the Sarum sources.

Invit. Alleluya. Surrexit Dominus.
This melody is part of an Alleluya series in Eastertide.

[8]
The four Invitatory Antiphons for Sundays in Trinity-tide (beginning with Laudemus Jesum Christum) vary according to the Lections at Matins: Sapientia, Job through to Judith, Maccabeorum, Ezechielis.  They form a series of related melodies. Three are designated Mode II.  The second, Laudemus nomen Domini, is designated Mode I.  However, this latter Antiphon is attached to the Mode II Venite Tone in BL-52359. Related is also ‘Laudemus Jesum Christum in conversione’ {202} for the Feast of St. Paul.
These Invitatory Antiphons appear to be the most elaborate grouping of Invitatory Antiphons for the Temporale in the Western tradition.

Invit. Laudemus Jesum Christum quia
This Invitatory Antiphon is unique to the Sarum repertory in CANTUS.

Invit. Laudemus nomen Domini. (cf. Ps. 99/c : 3-4.)
This Invitatory Antiphon is unique to the Sarum repertory in CANTUS.

[9]
Invit. Adaperiat Dominus. 2. Macc. 1:4.
Compare the Antiphon at First Vespers, Adaperiat Dominus, and the First Responsory at Matins, also Adaperiat Dominus.

Invit. Deus Rex celestis.
That this Invitatory Antiphon is sung every Sunday when the service is of the Sunday from the Sunday after v. kalendas Novembris until Advent is not explicit in the rubrics.
Note the theme of God sitting on a throne, which also appears in the Antiphon at First Vespers and in the First Responsory of Matins.

(In what appears to be a development of this theme, in 1925 the last Sunday in October–the earliest date for the History of Ezechiel Vidi Dominum–was selected for a new feast of Christ the King (‘Domini nostri Jesu Christ Regis’) in the Roman Catholic Church. In 1969 the feast, renamed ‘Domini nostri Jesu Christi universorum Regis’, was moved to the Sunday next before Advent, the last Sunday of the History of Ezechiel.)

[10]
Invit. Regem venturum Dominum.
Invit. Alleluya. iiij.
The ferial melody of the Advent Invitatory Antiphon Regem venturum Dominum is also used for ferias in Eastertide with a contrafacta Alleluya.  This is the most basic Invitatory Antiphon-melody, and it is associated with the simplest chant for the Venite, Tone VI.iii.

[11]
In dominicis diebus.

Hymn. Primo dierum Dominum.
The ‘winter’ Hymn for Sundays after the Octave of Epiphany until Lent is dated to the VI-VII c. and attributed to St. Gregory.
The melody is a Sarum/York variant of the standard western melody.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Robert Bridges, The Yattendon Hymnal, 31.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. M. Neale, Collected Hymns, Seuqences, and Carols, 85.

[14]
Hymn. Nocte surgentes.
The ‘summer’ Hymn, is dated to the VIII-IX. c. and  attributed to St. Gregory or to Alcuin.
According to Matthew Britt (The Hymns of the Berviary and Missal, 43), this is the companion of the Hymn Ecce jam noctis.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Percy Dearmer, The English Hymnal, 165.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) G. H. Palmer, ed., The Hymner, #55, p. 52.
The Sarum Rite maintains the summer Hymns through to Advent, whereas the Roman Breviary reverts to the winter Hymns in the late fall.

[15]
The image is of Samuel anointing David. (‘Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren.’ I Samuel (I Kings) 16:13.)

1 Ant. Non auferetur (Gen 49:10.)
The series of nine Antiphons for Advent cycle through the 8 modes; Antiphon 9 uses Mode IV.  The first three Antiphons are based on Genesis 49:10-12.

[16]
1 Ant. Servite Domino (Ps. 2:11.)
The series of nine Antiphons for the season from the Octave of the Epiphany until Passion Sunday is based upon the associated Psalms. In many cases the text is identical in the Old Roman and the Gallican Psalters. However, where the text is identical with only one of those sources, that source is indicated.
This would appear to be the oldest of the three cycles of Sunday Matins Antiphons.

1 Ant. Pro fidei meritis (cf. Ps. 1:2.)
The series of nine Antiphons for Trinity-tide also cycles through the 8 modes; Antiphon 9 again uses Mode IV.
The series appears in AH-XXVII:1 (p. 19).

The decorated initial (Antiphonale 1519:4v.) illustrates King David at prayer.

The Sarum Psalter follows the secular rather than the monastic cursus. The 150 Psalms are distributed in an orderly manner throughout the week. Generally speaking Psalms 1-108 are sung in order through the week at Matins, beginning on Sunday, while Psalms 109-150 are sung in order through the week at Vespers, also commencing on Sunday. Psalm 94 is sung daily at Matins as the Invitatory. Certain other Psalms assigned to particular places at other Hours of the day are omitted from Matins and Vespers. Psalms 62 and 66, and 148-150 are sung daily at Lauds; Psalm 92 is sung at Lauds on Sundays while Psalm 50 is sung at Lauds on weekdays. A further selection of Psalms appropriate to morning (99, 5, 42, 64, 89, 142, and 91) are omitted from the Matins-Vespers cycle; one is assigned to each week-day at Lauds.
A further selection of Psalms is omitted from the weekly cycle and provided for daily use at the little hours, Prime, Terce, Sext, None and Compline. Prime takes Psalms 21-25, 53, and the first three parts of Psalm 118. (It should be noted that Prime takes up the order of Psalms at 21, following Psalm 20, the final Psalm at Matins on Sundays.)  The remainder of Psalm 118 is divided amongst the hours of Terce, Sext, and None. Psalms 4, 90, and 133 are sung daily at Compline.  The first part of Psalm 30, up to verse 6 (so as to include the text ‘into thy hands I commend my spirit’, is also sung at Compline, while the the whole of Psalm 30 appears on Mondays as part of the Matins cycle.
Thus in principle the entire Psalter is recited each week. In practice, however, this weekly cycle is frequently interrupted by the Feasts of the Sanctorale and the Holy Days of the Temporale during which other selections of Psalms are often appointed.
Besides the Psalter cycles described here, Salisbury Cathedral also maintained a roster of Canons each of which was assigned a portion of the Psalter to be recited daily, such that the entire Psalter, including the Old Testament Canticles and the Litany, was recited on a daily basis. See Christopher Wordsworth, Ceremonies and Processions of the Cathedral Church of Salisbury, 129-132.  This practice was typical of secular foundations of canons.

Ps. 1

Ps. 2

[17]
Ps. 3

Ps. 4 is omitted at Sunday Matins since it is used daily at Compline.

[18]
Ps. 5 is omitted at Sunday Matins since it is used at Lauds on Mondays.

Ps. 6

[20]
2 Ant. Erit ipse expectacio (Gen. 49:10-11.)
The only non-Sarum source in CANTUS for this chant is Beneventan.

2 Ant. Domine Deus meus. (Ps. 7:2.)

2 Ant. Juste Deus judex (after Ps. 7:12)
In non-Sarum sources this Antiphon often appears as ‘Deus judex justus’, matching the Psalm-text.
This Antiphon and the six that follow in the ‘summer’ series at Matins comprise a 14th. c. processional ‘Hymn to God’ in AH-43:#17, p. 16. They are all in the form of rudimentary poetic couplets.

Ps. 7

[21]
Ps. 8

[22]
Ps. 9
At verse 21 the Hebrew Psalter (and the Coverdale (BCP) Psalter) commences Psalm 10.

[23]
Ps. 10

[25]
3 Ant. Pulchriores sunt oculi (Gen. 49:12.)

3 Ant. Respice et exaudi (Ps. 12:3.)

3 Ant. Surge in eternum

Ps. 11

[26]
Ps. 12

Ps 13

[27]
Ps. 14

V. Ex Syon species decoris (Ps. 49:2-3.)

V. Memor fui nocte (Ps. 118:55.)

[28]
4 Ant. Bethleem non es minima (Matthew 2:6; 1:21.)

4 Ant. Bonorum meorum (Ps. 16:2; 1 (Old Roman).)

[29]
4 Ant. Nature genitor
Trans. J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 44.
This Antiphon is rhymed and metered.

Ps. 15

[31]
5 Ant. Ecce virgo concipiet (Isaiah 7:14.)

5 Ant. Inclina Domine (Ps 17:6.)

5 Ant. Pectora nostra
The melody is that of the above Antiphon, Ecce virgo.

Ps. 16

[33]
6 Ant. Orietur in diebus (Ps. 71:7; 11.)
In CANTUS this text is usually set to Mode III, and is used for the Nativity.

6 Ant. Dominus firmamentum (Ps. 18:3.)

6 Ant. Tu populum

Ps. 17

[36]
V. Egredietur virga (Isaiah 11:1.)

V. Media nocte surgebam (Ps. 119:62.)

[37]
7 Ant. Nox precessit (Rom. 13:12.)
‘appropinquabit’ replaces the Vulgate ‘appropinquavit’.

7 Ant. Preceptum Domini (Ps. 19:9.)

[38]
7 Ant. Sponsus ut e thalamo (cf. Joel 2:16 and Ps. 19:5.)

Ps. 18

[39]
8 Ant. Hora est jam (after Rom. 13:11.)

[40]
8 Ant. Impleat Dominus (Ps 20:7.)

8 Ant. Auxilium nobis

Ps. 19

[41]
9 Ant. Gaudete in Domino (Phil. 4:4.)

[42]
9 Ant. Domine in virtute (Ps. 21:1.)

9 Ant. Rex sine fine

Ps. 20

[43]
V. Egredietur Dominus (after Isaiah 25:21.)

V. Exaltare Domine (Ps 21:13.)

[44]
Cant. Te Deum laudamus

In the text this Canticle is referred to as a Psalm.
The baptism of St. Augustine referred to in the text took place in 387. The text has also been ascribed to St. Hilary and to Nicetas, Bishop of Remesiana.
The Te Deum is typically sung at Matins when ‘Gloria in excelsis’ is sung at Mass.
The Neuma is printed at the end since it will always be sung when the Canticle is sung.
In the Tridentine Breviary the Te Deum follows the ninth Lesson at Matins (no ninth Responsory appears), whereas in the Sarum Use it follows the ninth Responsory.

The Te Deum is sung on Sundays and Feasts of Nine Lessons only. It is omitted during Advent and from Septuagesima to Easter, on all Vigils, including the Vigil of Epiphany when it falls on a Sunday, and on the Four Seasons (Ember Days), including those of the week of Pentecost.

[48]
Versus ante laudes
Lauds normally follows directly after Matins. The versus ante laudes is followed immediately with Deus in adjutorium &c.

V. Excelsus super omnes gentes (Ps. 113:4.)

[49]
In laudibus
The image is of the Visitation, the first of a series on the life of Christ which carries through the hours of the day.

1 Ant. Regnavit Dominus (cf. Ps 92:1.)

Ps. 92
Ps. 92 is sung each Sunday at Lauds, except from Septuagesima through to Easter, when the penitential Ps. 50 takes its place.

[50]
2 Ant. Sciamus omnes

Ps. 99
The second Psalm of Lauds varies with the days of the week.  Most appear to have been selected on account of references to the morning:
. . . mane exaudies vocem meam (Ps. 5:4.)
. . . exitus matutíni et vespere delectabis (Ps. 64:9.)
. . . Mane sicut herba transeat (Ps. 89:6.)
. . . Audítam fac mihi mane misericordiam tuam (Ps. 142:8.)
. . . ad annunciandum mane misericordiam tuam (Ps. 91:3.)

Sunday Jubilate Deo (99)
Monday Verba mea (5)
Tuesday Judica me Deus (42)
Wednesday Te decet hymnus (64)
Thursday Domine refugium (89)
Friday Domine exaudi orationem (142)
Saturday Bonum est confiteri (91)

[51]
3 Ant. Benedicam te Domine (cf. Ps. 104:33.)

Ps. 62
This Psalm appears to have been selected for use at Laud on account of its opening verse: Deus, Deus meus, ad te de luce vigilo.

Ps. 66
Pss. 62 and 66 are paired at Lauds, and are sung thus daily.

[52]
4 Ant. Omnis creatura

At Lauds a different Old Testament Canticle is found in fourth place on each day of the week.  In the text the Canticles are referred to as Psalms.

Sunday Benedicite (Daniel 3)
Monday Confitebor tibi (Isaiah 12)
Tuesday Ego dixi (Ezechiel 38)
Wednesday Exultavit cor meum (1 Kings 2)
Thursday Cantemus Domino (Exodus 15)
Friday Dominus audivi (Habbakuk 3)
Saturday Audite celi (Deuteronomy 32)

Cant. Benedicite omnia opera (cf. Dan 3:57-88)
In the Bible the phrase ‘laudate/laudet et superexaltate eum in secula’ appears after every invocation.
No Gloria Patri appears here. ‘Benedicamus Patrem’ &c. is not found in the Bible, but is a Doxology that matches the style of the Canticle.
In the BCP the ‘Gloria Patri’ is included (but not in the 1928 revision).

[53]
5 Ant. Spiritus omnis (cf. Pss. 150:6 and 148:5.)

Ps. 148

Ps. 149

Ps. 150

Pss. 148-150 form a concluding group daily at Lauds. The initial word ‘Laudate’ would appear to be the origin of the name ‘Lauds’ for this service.

[55]
Chap. Benedictio et claritas (Apoc. 7:12.)

Hymn. Eterne rerum Conditor
Text by St. Ambrose.
This is the ‘winter’ Hymn at Lauds.
Trans. (Performing Edition) William John Copeland, Hymns for the Week (1848). 7.
Tran. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 62-63. (Doxology by Neale.)

[58]
V. Dominus regnavit (Ps 93:1)
This V. recalls the opening of Lauds.

V. Domine refugium (Ps. 90:1)
This V. is used during the pre-penitential season from Septuagesima until Lent.

Hymn. Ecce jam noctis
Attributed to St. Gregory or to Alcuin. This is the ‘summer’ Hymn at Lauds. According to Matthew Britt (The Hymns of the Breviary, p. 54), this is the companion Hymn of Nocte surgentes.
This hymn is used daily, but the ferias take a different melody.
Trans. Maxwell Julius Blacker (1822-1888), George Herbert Palmer, ed. The Hymner, 2nd. ed. (London: Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, 1905): #56.

[59]
V. Dominus regnavit (Ps 93:1)

Proper Antiphons are appointed for the Benedictus on Sundays, whereas a series of texts drawn from the Benedictus are used on ferias.
The 1928 American BCP has the text “and from the hand of all that hate us”.

Cant. Benedictus

[60]
It will be noted that the Preces, including Pater noster, are not sung at Lauds on ordinary Sundays.

Any Memorials appointed to be sung will follow, before the Prayers for the Peace of the Church.

Pro pace ecclesia
This devotion is said on kneeling days.
It is also said after Comnpline.
‘sine nota’ indicates here ‘recto tono’, i.e. on a single pitch.

Ps. 122

V. Exurge Domine (Ps 23:46 (Old Roman).)

V. Domine Deus virtutum (Ps. 79:20)

[61]
Prayer. Ecclesie tue quesumus.
This is the Collect from the Missa Pro universali Ecclesia (Mass for the Universal Church)

[Here the Performing Edition places the Common Memorials at Lauds on Sundays and Feasts. In the other editions they are to be found in the Temporale.]

[63]
Ad primam.

Continuing with the series of images of the life of Christ is the Nativity.

Hymn. Jam lucis orto sydere
The Hymn possibly dates to the VIII century.  Ambrosian metre (iambic dimeter)
This Hymn is provided with more Melodies than any other Hymn. The Melodies tend to be those associated with the changing seasons, but there are also proper Melodies for Feasts, ferias, Vigils, and the Octave of the Dedication.
The Melody for Sundays in Advent is that of Vox clara ecce intonat of Lauds in Advent.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 4.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) John D. Chambers, Lauda Syon, [9]

In the Hereford Use the Hymn ‘Corde natus ex Parentis’ appears from Christmas through to the Circumcision.
In the York Use the Hymn ‘Agnoscat omne seculum’ appears from Christmas until the Octave of the Epiphany.

[64]
The Melody for ferias is a unique Melody for Prime.

[66]
The elaborate Melody for the Nativity and feasts is a unique Melody for Prime.

[68]
The melody for Feasts in Christmastide is that of A solis ortus cardine, for Lauds of the Nativity.

[69]
The Melody for use beginning with the sixth day of Christmas is that of Christe Redemptor omnium, for Matins of the Nativity.

[71]
The Melody for Vigils is a unique Melody for Prime.

[72]
The Melody for the Epiphany is that of Hostis Herodes impie, for Vespers of the Epiphany.

[74]
The Melody for use during the Octave of the Epiphany is the second Tune for Hostis Herodes impie.

[75]
The Melody for use after the Octave of the Epiphany until Lent is that of Deus Creator omnium, for Vespers on Saturdays (First Vespers of Sundays).

[77]
The Melody for the first two Sundays in Lent is that of Ex more docte mystico, for Vespers of those Sundays.

[78]
The Melody for the third and fourth Sundays in Lent is that of Ecce tempus idoneum, for Vespers of those Sundays.

[79]
The Melody for Passion Sunday and Palm Sunday is that of Vexilla regis, for Vespers of those Sundays.

[81]
The Melody for Sundays after Easter is that of Chorus nove Hierusalem, for Vespers of those Sundays.

[83]
The Melody for Ascensiontide is that of Eterne Rex altissime, for Vespers of Ascensiontide.

[84]
The Melody for Pentecost is that of Jam Christus astra ascenderat, for Vespers of Pentecost.

[86]
The Melody for Sundays in Trinitytide is that of Adesto sancta Trinitas, for Vespers and Matins of the Trinity.

[88]
The Melody for use within the Octave of the Dedication is a unique Melody for Prime.  (The proper Melody for Vespers, Matins, and Lauds of the Dedication is in trochaic tetrameter cataletic, and so cannot be used here).

[89]
The Melody for Feasts of Apostles and Evangelists is that of Exultet celum laudibus, for Lauds on Feasts of Apostles and Evangelists.

[90]
The Melody for Feasts of Saints in Easter-tide is that of Ad cenam Agni providi, for Vespers in Easter-tide.

[93]
The Melody for Octaves of the Blessed Virgin is that of Quem terra ponthus, for Matins and Lauds of the Virgin.

[95]
Ant. Dominus regit me (Ps. 22:1-2.)

Ant. Deus exaudi oracionem meam (Ps. 53:4.)

Ant. Veni et libera nos

There appears to be no rubric directly covering the selection of Psalms at Prime on ferias during ‘ordinary time’.  However Monday in the first week of Advent indicates Psalm 53 (Deus in nomine) and the first two parts of Psalm 118 (Beati immaculati and Retribue). The rubric on p. 670 (Monday in Domine ne in ira) indicates after Ps. 53. ‘Cetera omnia que ad j. pertinent : ut in secunda feria Adventus Domini supra dictum est expleantur.’ (‘Let all the rest which pertains to Prime : be done as is indicated on the Monday of the Advent of the Lord.’)  The rubric on p. 1733 (Deus omnium) indicates ‘Ad primam, et ad alias horas, omnium fiant sicut in Hystoria Domine ne in ira, ut supra dictum est’ (‘At Prime and at the other Hours, let all be made as in the History Domine ne in ira as is indicated above’).

[103]
All five of the Antiphons for the ‘Quicunque vult’ are drawn from the Feast of the Holy Trinity.

Ant. Te Deum Patrem
This Antiphon also appears at Second Vespers on the Feast of the Holy Trinity.
In other Uses this Antiphon is not used at Prime.
(In other Uses the text frequently appears as the final Responsory of Matins of the Holy Trinity.)
This Antiphon is part of the ‘Angelic Trisagion’, the official prayer of the Order of the Blessed Trinity (Trinitatians).

Ant. Te jure laudant
This Antiphon also appears as the fifth of Lauds on the Feast of the Holy Trinity, where it is accompanied by an Antiphon-Verse: ‘Tibi laus tibi gloria’.
In other Uses this Antiphon is not used at Prime.

Ant. Gratias tibi Deus
This Antiphon also appears at First Vespers on the Feast of the Holy Trinity.
In other Uses this Antiphon is not used at Prime.
In the English version ‘onely’ is intended to be pronounced ‘wonly’ to emphasize the unity, rather than as ‘ownly’ which emphasizes uniqueness.

[104]
Ant. Gloria tibi Trinitas
This text is in Ambrosian metre, 8.8.8.8.
The text ‘Gloria tibi Trinitas’ appears as a Doxology to the Lenten Hymns in the Anglo-Saxon ‘Canterbury Hymnal,’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 114v-115v. See Gernot R. Wieland, The Canterbury Hymnal (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1982): 72-75.
This Antiphon also appears as the first Antiphon of First Vespers on the Feast of the Holy Trinity.
As in the previous Antiphon, in the English version ‘onely’ is intended to be pronounced ‘wonly’ to emphasize the unity, rather than as ‘ownly’ which emphasizes uniqueness.
The York Use has a series of ferial Antiphons for the Quicunque vult, one for each week-day.

Ant. O beata et benedicta
This Antiphon also appears as the first Antiphon of Lauds on the Feast of the Holy Trinity.
The text is to be found in Bede’s ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’, J. A. Giles, ed., The complete Works of Venerable Bede, Vol. 1. (London: Whittaker and Co., 1853): 245.

Cant. Quicunque vult
This Creed, which acts liturgically as a Canticle, is often identified as a Psalm in the Sarum sources. It is also known as the Athanasian Creed.
The Roman Catholic Missal 1962 and the Book of Common Prayer share the same translation.
The Antiphon is concluded with a Neuma.
It appears that the Roman and Benedictine traditions include the ‘Quicunque vult’ only on Sundays, whereas the Sarum, Hereford, York, and Rouen traditions include it daily.
The Hereford Breviary includes only 3 antiphons on ‘Quicunque vult’: ‘Gratias tibi’, ‘Te jure laudant’, and ‘Gloria tibi Trinitas’.
The York Breviary includes 8 antiphons: Te Deum Patrem (Sundays), Gratias tibi (Feasts), and 6 others, one for each feria: ‘Adesto Deus’ (Monday), ‘Te unum in substantia’ (Tuesday), ‘Te semper idem esse’ (Wednesday), ‘Te invocamus’ (Thursday), ‘Spes nostra’ (Friday), and ‘Libera nos’ (Saturday).
The Rouen Breviary (1491) (unpaged, .pdf 361-362) provides 16 different Antiphons for the ‘Quicunque vult’, to be used according to a highly systematic set of rubrics.

‘Holy Church hath ordained that is should be sung each day openly at Prime, both in token that faith is the first beginning of health, and also for people use that time most to come to Church’ The Myrroure of our Lady: lxxv. b.

[109]
Chap. Pacem et veritatem.
The Vulgate and the ‘Old Roman’ have ‘exercituum’, not ‘omnipotens’.

Resp. Jesu Christe Fili Dei vivi (cf. Mat. 16:16; John 11:27.)
The Responsory text is always the same at Prime, but ‘Alleluya’ is added from the Nativity through the Octave of the Epiphany, from Easter through Pentecost, and for the festivals listed in the rubrics.
It has four variable Verses, depending on the occasion or season:
1) Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris (cr. Rom. 8:34; Heb. 1:3.)
2) Qui de virgine dignatus
3) Qui hodie mundo apparuisti
4) Qui surrexisti a mortuis
It has four variable Melodies that may be labelled:
1) Festal
2) Ferial in Eastertide and other high seasons
3) Ferial in ‘ordinary’ time
4) Daily in Advent

The usual (non Sarum) text is ‘Christe Fili Dei vivi’ etc.
The Roman form (Antiphonale Romanum, 1912) includes Verses 1) and 4) (above) as well as ‘Qui natus es de Maria Virgine’, ‘Qui apparuisti hodie’, ‘Qui venturus es in mundum’, and ‘Qui scandis super sidera’, and employs two Melodies, 2) above (with or without ‘Alleluia’–employed only from Easter through Pentecost), and a simpler version of 4), also used throughout Advent.

[111]
V. Exurge Domine adjuva nos (Ps. 43:26.)

[116]
V. Vivet anima mea (Ps. 118:175.)
V. Erravi sicut ovis (Ps. 118:176.)
V. Repleatur os meum (Ps. 70:8.)
V. Domine averte faciem tuam (Ps. 50:11.)

[117]
V. Cor mundum crea (Ps. 50:12.)
V. Ne projicias me (Ps. 50:13.)
V. Redde me leticiam (Ps. 50:14.)
V. Eripe me Domine (Ps. 139:2.)
V. Eripe me de inimicis (Ps. 58:2.)

[118]
V. Eripe me de operantibus (Ps. 58:3.)
V. Sic psalmum dicam (Ps. 60:9.)
V. Exaudi nos Deus (Ps. 64:6.)
V. Deus in adjutorium (Ps. 69:2.)
V. Sancte Deus
V. Benedic anima mea . . . et omnia (Ps. 102:1.)

[119]
V. Benedic anima mea . . . et noli (Ps. 102:2.)
V. Qui propitiatur omnibus (Ps. 102:3.)
V. Qui redimit de interitu (Ps. 102:4.)
V. Qui replet in bonis (Ps. 102:5.)

[120]
V. Deus tu conversus (Ps. 84:7.)
V. Ostende nobis (Ps. 84:8.)
V. Dignare Domine die isto
V. Miserere nostri (Ps. 122:3.)
V. Fiat misericordia (Ps. 32:22.)
V. Domine Deus virtutem (Ps. 79:20.)
V. Domine exaudi (Ps. 102:2.)

[121]
V. Dominus vobiscum

Prayer. In hac hora hujus diei
The York Use omits this Prayer and has only the following one.

Prayer. Domine sancte Pater omnipotens
This Prayer ‘is found in Menard’s edition of Gregory the Great’s Sacramentary, among the Orationes ad Matutinas lucescente die . . .’ John Henry Blunt, ed., The Annotated Book of Common Prayer (London: Rivington’s, 1866): 25.
The Gregorian and Roman forms are both somewhat different from the Sarum:
Gregorian: ‘Deus, qui nos ad pricipium hujus diei . . . ‘
Roman: Domine Deus omnipotens, qui ad principium hujus diei . . . ‘
It appears in the BCP as the ‘Collect for Grace’.

[123]
The Capitular Office
A useful overview of the Capitular Office is found in Procter and Dewick, eds., The Martiloge In Englysshe (London: Harrison and Sons, 1893): xxxii-xxxv.

Presumably at Salisbury Cathedral the Clerks exited the Quire through the South Doorway, and then continued westward along the South Aisle and so to the Chapter House. Of course each church that observed the Capitular Office would have a different location and a different route to get there.

It appears that in the Hereford Use there is no separate Capitular Office. Instead, the principal components of this Office are joined directly to the end of Prime. See Walter H. Frere and Langton Brown, eds., The Hereford Breviary. Vol III. (London: Harrison and Sons, 1913): 54. The Use of Hereford may be an apt model for those wishing to recite the Martyrology as part of the Divine Office rather than the Chapter.
The York Use, like that of Hereford, as indicated in Breviarium ad usum insignis Ecclesie Eboracensis Vol. 1. (Durham: Andrews & Co., 1880): 888-889, apparently has no separate Capitular Office.
It may be that at Hereford and York the practice was to conduct only the Chapter Meeting in the Chapter House. This meeting would presumably come after the conclusion of Prime and the Martyrology, that is, after the Prayer ‘Omnipotens sempiterne Deus salus eterna’.

Reading of the Martyrology
There appears to be no extant Sarum Martirology stemming directly from Salisbury Cathedral. However several MS Latin Martirologies, such as that in British Museum Harl. MS 2785. appears to be of Sarum Use.
Available resources are:
The Martyrology in English (London BL Add 22285 is a Latin Martirology from Sion Monastery which is similar, if not the same, as the text which Richard Whitford used for this translation.)
The Latin Martyrologium Ecclesie Cathedralis S. Trinitatis, Dublin, in John Clark Crosswaite, ed., The Book of Obits and Martirology (Dublin: Irish Archeological Society, 1844): 75-193 (googlebooks: The_Book_of_Obits_and_Martirology_Dublin).
Oxford, Bodleian Library Rawlinson B. 328 is an Obituary with Martyrology (ff. 59r-110v) from Hereford Cathedral.
(Other (non-Sarum) Martirologies are also to be found; see Michale Lapidge, The Cult of St Swithun (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003: 31-32.)
See also Richard Stanton, A Menology of England and Wales (London: Burns & Oates, 1892).

Reading of the Obits
Following the reading from the Martyrology, which represents the list of saints remembered universally, would be read the day’s entry from the Book of Obits, which is particular to each foundation–a register of founders, brethren, sisters, and others, benefactors, whose names were appointed to be mentioned on the days of their respective deaths.
This Obit Kalendar of Salisbury Cathedral is edited from Christopher Wordsworth, ed., Ceremonies and Processions of the Cathedral Church of Salisbury (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1901): 229-242.
(Two other Obit Kalendars are listed above, one from Dublin, another from Hereford.)

V. Preciosa est (Ps. 115:6.)

Prayer. Sancta Maria mater Domini nostri

[124]
V. Deus in adjutorium (Ps. 69:2.)
V. Gloria Patri

[125]
V. Kyrieleyson
Pater noster (and Ave Maria)
V. Et veniat super nos (Ps. 118:41.)
V. [Et] respice in servos (Ps. 89:16-17.)

[126]
Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus : dirige actus nostros
This is the Prayer for the sixth day of the Nativity, December 30. In the modern Roman Rite it is the Prayer for Sunday within the Octave of Christmas.

[127]
Prayer. Dirigere et sanctificare et regere
This Prayer appears in an expanded form in the Roman Office of Prime (LU: 233.)

. . . alteram lectionem [de omelia vel de libro theologorum] . . .
In place of a Lesson from a Homily or a theological work could be read one of the short biblical lessons found in LU: 23-234 (or in the Anglican Breviary: A32).

. . . usque post lectam tabulam . . .
This is the reading of the Duty-roster, indicating the persons assigned for each of the liturgical duties to be performed. Seeing that duties were normally assigned on a weekly basis, it would seem that the Duty-roster was read weekly rather than daily (likely on Saturday).

Ps. 120
‘sine nota’ indicates a single pitch with no inflection.
In the Hereford Use Ps. 129, De profundis, appears here.

[128]
V. Ostende nobis (Ps. 84:8.)
V. Salve fac servos
V. Mitte eis Domine (after Ps. 19:3.)
V. Esto eis Domine (after Ps. 60:4.)
V. Nichil proficiat (after Ps. 88:23.)

Prayer. Adesto Domine supplicationibus
This Prayer appears in the ‘Peregrinorum servitium’ of the Sarum Manuale, and in the ‘Itinerary’ of the Roman Breviary.
In the BCP this Prayer is found among the ‘Collects at Morning or Evening Prayer, or Communion, at the discretion of the Minister’.

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus
This Prayer was used in the time of Henry VII in the ‘Ceremony of the Royal Touch’ for the cure of scrofula (the King’s Evil). The Royal Touch dates from the time of Edward the Confessor, was formalized in the reign of Henry VII, and ceased to be practised after the reign of Queen Anne. For a detailed account of the ceremony see Edward Law Hussey, ‘On the Cure of Scrofulus Diseases Attributed to the Royal Touch’, The Archaeological Journal X (1852): 187-211. See also Anon, The Ceremonies for the Healing of them that be diseased with the King’s Evil, used in the time of King Henry VII (London: Henry Hills, 1686).

[131]
Ad tertiam.
The image is of the descent of the Holy Ghost upon the disciples and Mary, which is commemorated at the hour of Terce (Acts 2:15).
The 1525 Breviary has the image of Christ bearing the Cross, for it was at the third hour that Christ was condemned.

Hymn. Nunc Sancte nobis Spiritus
Attributed to St. Ambrose.
The Hymn commemorates the descent of the Holy Ghost at the third hour. (Acts 2:15.)
Trans. (Performing edition) J. M. Neale. Collected Hymns (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1914): 93.
Trans. (Scholarly edition) John H. Newman. Verses on Various Occasions (London: Burns & Oates, 1874): 241. (Doxology by Neale.)
The melody for Double Feasts is proper to Terce and does not occur elsewhere.
The doxologies vary with the seasons.
In the Use of Hereford the Hymn ‘Corporis formam caduci’ is employed at Terce from Christmas until the Circumcision.
In the York Use the Hymn ‘Maria ventre concepit’ is employed until the Octave of the Epiphany.

[132]
This melody is that used for Veni Creator Spiritus at Terce on Pentecost and the three days that follow.
B-flat may be used in the final phrase of each stanza. The older Sarum sources generally omit the flat, whereas it is found to a lesser or greater degree in the later Hymnals of 1532, 1541 and 1555.

[133]
The melody for the vigil of the Epiphany, Sundays and feasts is unique to Terce.

[134]
The simple ferial melody is also used for Sext and None.

[135]
Ant. Laus et perennis gloria
This is the second Antiphon at First Vespers of Trinity Sunday. It is in Ambrosian metre (8.8.8.8).
This text appears as the doxology for the Hymn for Martyrs Deus tuorum militum in the Anglo-Saxon ‘Canterbury Hymnal,’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 126r. See Gernot R. Wieland, The Canterbury Hymnal (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1982): 123, and concludes the same hymn in the pre and post-Tridentine Roman traditions (e.g. Breviarium Romanum (Paris, 1529), fo. C-60r; Breviarium Romanum (Rome, 1568): 900. However, in ‘The Canterbury Hymnal’ the final line is ‘in seculorum secula’, and in the Roman Hymn-version the final line is ‘in sempiterna secula’, in each case forming a rhyme with the first line.  (This text is not in the Sarum version of Deus tuorum militum.)
Trans.  in The Monastic Diurnal (London: Oxford University Press, 1932): 21*. (The last line has been altered to reflect the change of accent in the Antiphon as compared to the Hymn.)
It is of note that the incipit of this Antiphon is the full length of the first poetic line.

Ant. Veniant michi (Ps 118:77.)

Ant. Tuam Domine (cf. Ps 79:3.)

[136]
Ps. 118:iii

Ps. 118:iv

[157]
Ps. 118:v

[138]
Chap. Gratia Domini nostri (Cor 2:13.)
‘semper’ is not in the Vulgate; the Vulgate has ‘vobis’, not ‘nobis’.

Resp. Inclina cor meum (Ps 118:36, 37.)

V. Ego dixi (Ps 40:5.)

[139]
Chap. Sana me Domine (Jer. 17:14.)

Resp. Sana animam meam (Ps 40:5.)
This Responsory exchanges the clauses of the previous Versicle, Ego dixi.

V. Adjutor meus (Ps 26:9.)

[140]
Chap. Qui venturus est veniet (after Heb. 10:37.)
This Chapter matches the third Responsory for the third Sunday of Advent.

Resp. Veni ad liberandum (after Ps 78:4.)

V. Timebunt gentes (Ps 101:16.)

[142]
Ad sextam.

The image appears to represent the sun at its height, an image of divine splendour (ignibus meridiem, the brightness of mid-day, from the Hymn for Sext).
The 1525 Breviary has the image of Christ being nailed to the Cross, for it was at this hour that Christ was crucified.

Hymn. Rector potens verax Deus
Attributed to St. Ambrose.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted: 6.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 136. (Doxology by Neale.)
The melody for feasts is also used at None.
In the Use of Hereford the Hymn ‘Ecce quem vates vetustis’ is employed at Sext from Christmas until the Circumcision.
In the York Use the Hymn ‘Presepe poni pertulit’ is employed until the Octave of the Epiphany.

[143]
The Melody for the Vigil of the Epiphany, for Sundays, &c. is a unique Melody for Sext.

[144]
The Melody for ferias is shared with Terce and Sext.

[145]
Ant. Gloria laudis resonet in ore
This Antiphon is in the Sapphic stanza, 11.11.11.5.
It appears as the 3rd Antiphon of First Vespers on the Feast of the Trinity.
It is found as the Doxology in the Hymn Christe Salvator hominis for St. Vedast by Alcuin (AH-L, #109, p. 154-155).
Trans. based on J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 141.

Ant. Non confundas me (Ps 118:116.)

Ant. In tuo adventu

Ps. 118:vi

Ps. 118:vii

[147]
Ps. 118:viii

[148]
Chap. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant (1 John 5:7)

Resp. In eternum Domine (Ps 118:89 (Old Roman).)

V. Dominus regit me (Ps 22:1.)

[149]
Chap. Omnia probate (1. Thess. 5:21-22.)

Resp. Benedicam Dominum (Ps 33:2.)

V. Dominus regit me (Ps 22:1.)

Chap. Prope est ut veniat (based on Isaiah 14:1.)

[150]
Resp. Ostende nobis Domine (Ps 84:8.)

V. Memento nostri Domine (Ps 105:4.)

[151]
Ad nonam.

The image appears to be of the saints on earth flanking the church, which points the way to the saints in heaven, perhaps in reference to Stanza 2 of the Hymn.
The image in the 1525 Breviary is of Christ dead upon the Cross, for it was at this hour that Christ died.

Hymn. Rerum Deus tenax vigor
Attributed to St. Ambrose.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 7.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 144, and Lauda Syon: [39]. (Doxology by Neale.)
The melody for double feasts is shared with Sext.
In the Use of Hereford the Hymn ‘Juste Judex mortuorum’ is employed at None from Christmas until the Circumcision.
In the York Use the Hymn ‘Adam vetus quod polluit’ is employed until the Octave of the Epiphany.

[152]
The melody for the Vigil of the Epiphany, Sundays, &c. is shared with Terce.

[153]
The melody for ferias is shared with Terce and Sext.

[154]
Ant. Ex quo omnia (cf. I Cor. 8:6.)

Ant. Juxta eloquium (Ps 118:169.)

Ant. Veni Domine

Ps. 118:ix

[155]
Ps. 118:x

[156]
Ps. 118:xi

[157]
Chap. Unum Dominus (Eph. 4:5-6)
‘qui est benedictus in secula’ is found at Rom. 1:25 and 2 Cor. 11:31.

Resp. Clamavi in toto corde (Ps 118:145.)

V. Ab occultis meis (Ps 18:13.)

[158]
Chap. Alter alterius (Gal. 6:2.)

Resp. Redime me Domine (after Ps 25:11.)

V. Ab occultis meis (Ps 18:13.)

[159]
Chap. Venite ascendamus.
Listed as Micah in the Psalter, but Isaiah in the Temporale (p. 108).

Resp. Super te Hierusalem (Isaiah 60:2.)

V. Domine Deus virtutum (Ps 79:20.)

[161]
Feria secunda.

The image is of the arrest of Jesus, part of a series on Holy Week that appear on the ferias at Matins.

Invit. Venite exultemus Domino (Ps 94:1.)
The Invitatory Antiphons for the ferias proceed in sequence weekly through verses of Psalm 94.

Hymn. Somno refectis artubus.
Text by St. Ambrose.
This is the ‘winter’ Hymn at Matins on Mondays.  All the ‘winter’ ferial Hymns at Matins ask God for help against sin through the coming day; they all share the same melody.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Monastic Matins, 24.
Tran. (Scholarly Edition) J. M. Neale, Night Hours II:
Another translation is found in J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 152, revised in Lauda Syon: [11].

[163]
Hymn. Nocte surgentes.
The ‘summer’ Hymn.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Percy Dearmer, The English Hymnal, 165.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) G. H. Palmer, ed., The Hymner (1905): 52.

[164]
Ant. Dominus defensor. (based on Ps 26:1.) Old Roman.
The ferial Antiphons are generally taken from verses of the associated Psalms.

[166]
Ant. Adorate Dominum (based on Ps 28:2.) Old Roman.

[167]
Ant. In tua justicia (based on Ps 30:1.) Old Roman.

[169]
Ant. Rectos decet (Ps 32:1.)

[171]
Ant. Expugna (Ps 34:1.)

[174]
Ant. Revela Domino (Ps 36:5.) Gallican

[177]
V. Domine in celo (Ps 35:5.)

V. Fiat misericordia (Ps 32:22.) Gallican
The ordinary ferial Versicle before Lauds.

Ant. MIserere mei Deus (Ps 50:3.)

[178]
Ant. Intellige clamorem (Ps 5:2.)

. . . Asperges me ysopo . . . The inclusion of ‘Domine’ in some editions would appear to stem from the text as found in the Blessing of Salt and Water in the Processional.

[179]
Ant. Deus Deus meus (Ps 62:2.)

[180]
Ant. Conversus est (Isaiah 12:1.)

Ant. Laudate Dominum (Ps 148:1.)

[181]
Hymn. Splendor Paterne glorie
Text by St. Ambrose.
This is the ‘winter’ Hymn on Mondays.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Robert Bridges, in The Yattendon Hymnal 29; The English Hymnal 52.
Tran.s (Scholarly Edition) J. M. Neale and J. D. Chambers, Collected Hymns (1914): 96; Verse 8, Monastic Matins: 49.

[183]
V. In matutinis Domine (Ps 62:7-8.) Gallican

Hymn. Ecce jam noctis
This is the ‘summer’ Hymn daily; the weekdays take a different melody that that of Sundays.
Attributed to Saint Gregory.
Trans. Maxwell Julius Blacker (1822-1888), George Herbert Palmer, ed. The Hymner, 2nd. ed. (London: Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, 1905): #56.

[184]
Ant. Benedictus Deus Israel (after Luke 1:68.)%
This Antiphon begins a cycle of Antiphons on the Benedictus through the week-days, Monday-Saturday.

[185]
V. Ego dixi Domine (Ps 40:5.)

V. Convertere (Ps 89:13.)

[186]
V. Fiat misericordia (Ps 32:22.)

V. Sacerdotes tui (Ps 131:9.)

V. Domine salvum fac (Ps 19:10.)
When the monarch is a queen the Versicle would be ‘Dómine salvum fac regínam’

V. Salvos fac servos (based on Ps 16:7.)

Salvum fac populum (Ps 27:9.)

V. Domine fiat pax (Ps 121:7.)

[187]
V. Oremus pro fidelibus (not biblical.)

V. Exaudi Domine vocem meam (Ps 26:7.)

V. Exurge Domine (Ps 43:26.)

V. Domine Deus virtutum (Ps 79:20.)

[188]
V. Domine exaudi (Ps 101:2.)

The Prayer is that of the preceding Sunday.

[189]
A Memorial consists of an Antiphon, Versicle, and Prayer. By default these are taken from Lauds of the feast being commemorated in the morning, and from Vespers in the evening. The selections provided here provide some variety to the Common Memorials.

Memorial of St. Mary at Lauds in Advent
Ant. Spiritussanctus in te (Luke 1:35.)
This Antiphon uses ‘descendet’ rather than the Vulgate ‘superveniet’.

V. Egredietur virga (Isaiah 11:1.)

Prayer. Deus qui de beate Marie virginis

Memorial of All Saints at Lauds and Vespers in Advent
Ant. Ecce Dominus veniet

V. Ecce apparebit Dominus

Prayer. Conscientias nostras

[190]
(In the Performing Edition the Memorials at Vespers appear in section A-10, pages [398]-[410])
Memorial of St. Mary at Vespers in Advent
Ant. Ne timeas Maria (Luke 1:30.)
‘enim’ is omitted in the Antiphon.

Memorial of St. Mary until the Purification

[191]
Ant. Quando natus es
. . . sicut pluvia in vellus . . . (Ps. 71:6.)

Ant. Ecce Maria genuit
. . . Ecce Agnus Dei : ecce qui tolit peccata mundi . . . (after John 1: 29.)
(note: the Vulgate has ‘peccatum’.)

This antiphon is taken from the fifth of Lauds of the Circumcision.

[192]
Ant. Rubum quem viderat (cf. Exod. 3:2.)

Ant. Germinavit radix Jesse

V. Post partum virgo

[193]
V. Speciosus forma

Prayer. Deus qui salutis eterne
In the Roman Use this Prayer appears on the Feast of the Circumcision (January 1) and it concludes the Suffrage of St. Mary after Compline from Christmas to the Purification.

Memorial of St. Mary after the Purification
Ant. Beata mater et innupta virgo

V. Post partum

[194]
Memorial of the Cross at Lauds after Deus omnium
Ant. Nos autem gloriari (after Ga. 6:14.)

V. Omnis terra adoret (Ps 65:4.)

Prayer. Deus qui sanctam crucem ascendisti

[195]
Prayer. Perpetua quesumus Domine pace custodi

Prayer. Adesto nobis Domine Deus noster
This is the Postcommunion for the Mass of the Holy Cross

Memorial of St. Mary at Lauds after Deus omnium

Prayer. Famulorum tuorum quesumus

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus : nos famulos

Memorial of All Saints at Lauds after Deus omnium
Ant. Exultabunt sancti (Ps 149:5.)

V. Mirabilis Deus (after Ps 67:36.)

Prayer. Infirmitatem nostram quesumus Domine
This Prayer forms the basis of the concluding Collect in the BCP Litany: ‘We humbly beseech thee, O Father, mercifully to look upon our infirmities . . . ‘

Prayer. Omnium sanctorum tuorum quesumus

Prayer. Vide Domine infirmitates nostras

Prayer. Tribue quesumus Domine omnes sanctos

Memorial of the Cross at Vespers after Deus omnium
Ant. Salva nos Christe Salvator
The standard CANTUS text omits ‘sancte’.
This is the fourth Antiphon at Matins of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (September 14).
In the Roman Use this is the second Antiphon at Lauds of the Invention of the Holy Cross and the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.

[197]
Ant. Per signum crucis
This is the second Antiphon at Matins of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.
In the Roman Use this text is also used for the Communion at Mass on the Feast of the Invention of the Holy Cross and on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.

Ant. Adoramus te Christe
This is the single Antiphon at Matins of the Invention of the Holy Cross and the first Antiphon at Matins of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.
In the Roman Use it appears on Good Friday at the preparation for Holy Communion.

[198]
Memorial of St. Mary at Vespers after Deus omnium
Ant. Sancta Maria virgo
This is the third Antiphon at First Vespers of the Conception of Blessed Mary (December 8) and the Nativity of Blessed Mary (September 8), and the Antiphon on the Psalms at Compline on the feast of the Assumption of Blessed Mary (August 15).

V. Sancta Dei genitrix

Ant. Sancta Dei genitrix

Ant. In prole mater

[199]
Memorial of All Saints at Vespers after Deus omnium
Ant. Sancti Dei omnes

V. Letamini in Domino (Ps 31:11.)

V. Exultent justi (after Ps 67:4.)

Ant. Omnes electi Dei

[200]
Ant. Sanctorum precibus

Ant. O quam gloriosum est regnum (c.f. Apoc. 7:9; 14:4.)
This is the ninth Antiphon at Matins on the Feast of Relics and of Feasts of Many Confessors, and the second Antiphon at First Vespers of All Saints.
In the Roman Use this is the Antiphon on the Magnificat at Second Vespers of All Saints.

[203]
Feria tertia.

The image appears to be the scourging of Christ.

Invit. Jubilemus Deo (Ps 94:1b)

Hymn. Consors parterni luminis
Text by St. Ambrose.
Transl. (Performing Edition), Monastic Matins, 42.
Tran. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [15].

[205]
Ant. Ut non delinquam (Ps 38:2.)

[207]
Ant. Sana Domine (Ps 40:5.)

[208]
Ps. 41.
Many versions of the Douay-Rheims translation have in Verse 11: ‘Whilst they say to me day be day . . .’.

[209]
Ps 42, omitted here, is sung at Lauds on Tuesdays.

Ant. Eructavit cor meum (Ps 44:2.)

[211]
Ant. Adjutor in tribulationibus (Ps 45:2.)

[213]
Ant. Auribus percipe (Ps 48:2.) Old Roman

[214]
Ant. Deus deorum (Ps 49:1.)

[216]
Ps 50, omitted here, is sung at Lauds on weekdays.

[217]
V. Immola Deo (Ps 49:14.)

V. Fiat miseriordia (Ps 32:22.) Gallican

Ant. Secundum magnam (Ps 50:3.)

[218]
Ant. Salutare (Ps 42:5.)
The Gallican and Old Roman Psalters include ‘et’.

Ant. Ad te de luce (Ps 62:2.)
Compare Ant. 4 at Lauds on Mondays.

[219]
Ant. Cuntis diebus (Isaiah 38:20.)

[220]
Ant. In excelsis (Ps 148:1.)

Hymn. Ales diei nuntius
Text by Prudentius.
The hymns for ferias iii-v. are from the Liber Cathemerinon.
Trans. (Performing Edition), J. M. Neale, Collected Hymns: 98.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [17].

[222]
Ant. Erexit Dominus (Luke 1:69.)

[223]
Feria quarta.

The image appears to be of the mocking of Jesus.

Invit. In manu tua (after Ps 94:4.)

Hymn. Rerum Creator optime
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) in Monastic Matins: 51.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 196, revised in Lauda Syon: [19].

[225]
Ant. Avertet Domnius (after Ps 52:7; compare Ps 13:7.)

Ps 53, omitted here, is sung at Prime.

[227]
Ant. Quoniam (Ps 56:2.)

[229]
Ant. Juste judicate (Ps 57:2 (Old Roman).)

[230]
Ant. Da nobis Domine (Ps 59:13.)

[232]
Ant. A timore (Ps 63:1.)

Ps 62, omitted here, is sung daily at Lauds.

[234]
Ps 64, omitted here,  is sung at Lauds this day.

Ant. In ecclesiis (Ps 67:27.) (Gallican)

[235]
Ps 66, omitted here, is sung daily at Lauds.

[237]
V. Deus vitam meam (Ps 55:9 (Gallican).)
The text in the Performing Edition is from J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 206. The BCP version is ‘[V. O God,] thou tellest my flittings. [R.] Put my tears into thy bottle.’

[238]
Ant. Amplius lava me (Ps 50:4 (Old Roman).)

Ant. Te decet hymnus (Ps 64:2.)

Ant. Labia mea laudabunt (after Ps 62:4.)

[239]
Ant. Dominus judicabit (I Kings (Samuel) 2:10.)

[240]
Ant. Celi celorum (Ps 148:4.)

Hymn. Nox et tenebre
Text by Prudentius.
Trans. (Performing Edition) Robert Martin Pope, The English Hymnal 54.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 208, revised in Lauda Syon: [21].

[241]
Ant. Salutem ex inimicis (Luke 1:71.)

[243]
Feria quinta.

The image is of Christ carrying the Cross.

Invit. Adoremus Dominum (after Ps. 94:6; cf. Ps 99:3.)

Hymn. Nox atra rerum.
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing edition) in Monastic Matins: 61.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 211, revised in Lauda Syon: [23].

[245]
Ant. Domine Deus (Ps. 69:2 (Old Roman).)

[247]
Ant. Esto michi (Ps. 70:3.)

[250]
Ant. Liberasti virgam (cf. Ps 73:2 (Old Roman).)

[252]
Ant. In Israel (Ps. 75:2.)

[253]
Ant. Tu es Deus (Ps 76:15.)

[257]
Ant. Propitius esto (Ps 78:9.)

[259]
V. Gaudebunt Labia (Ps 70:23.) Old Roman

[260]
Ant. Tibi soli peccavi (Ps 50:6.)

Ant. Domine refugium (Ps 89:1.)

[261]
Ant. In matutinis (Ps 62:7.)

Ant. In eternum (Exod. 15:18.)

[263]
Ant. In sanctis ejus (Ps 150:1.)

Hymn. Lux ecce surgit
Text by Prudentius.
Trans. (Performing Edition) by Robert Martin Pope, The English Hymnal, 55.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 231, revised in Lauda Syon: [25].

[265]
Ant. In sanctitate (after Luke 1:75, 74, 71.)

[267]
Feria sexta.

The image is of the Crucifixion.

Invit. Dominum qui fecit nos. {Ps 94:6.) Gallican.

Hymn. Tu Trinitatis Unitas.
Attributed to St. Gregory
Trans. (Performing Edition) in Monastic Matins: 72.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 232, revised in Lauda Syon: [27].

[269]
Ant. Exultate Deo (Ps 80:2.)

[271]
Ant. Tu solus Altissimus (Ps. 96:9; after Ps 82:19.) after Gallican Psalter.

[272]
Ant. Benedixisti Domine (Ps 84:2.)

[274]
Ant. Fundamenta ejus (Ps 86:1.)

[275]
Ant. Benedictus Dominus (Ps 88:53.)

[277]
Ps 89, omitted here, is sung at Lauds on Thursdays

[278]
Ps 90, omitted here, is sung daily at Compline.

[279]
Ps 91, omitted here, is sung at Lauds on Saturdays

[280]
Ps 92, omitted here, is sung at Lauds on Sundays

[281]
Ps 94, omitted here, is sung daily at Matins as the Invitatory Psalm.

[282]
Ant. Cantate Domino (Ps 95:2.) Gallican

[283]
V. Intret oratio mea (Ps. 87:3.) Old Roman.

Ant. Spiritu principali (after Ps 50:14.)

[284]
Ant. In veritate (Ps 142:1.)

[285]
Ant. Illumina Domine (after Ps. 66:2)

Ant. Domine audivi (after Habakkuk 3:2.)

[286]
Ant. In tympano et choro (Ps 150:4.)

[287]
Hymn. Eterna celi gloria.
Anon, 5th c.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted (1854), Collected Hymns: 100.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 246, revised in Lauda Syon: [29].

[288]
Ant. Per viscera (Luke 1:78.) Gallican

[291]
Sabbato.

The image is of Mary holding her dead Son; the pietà. This image is taken from the 1516 Breviary, since the image in the 1531 Breviary is of the Crucifixion, as on Friday.

Invit. Dominum Deum nostrum (after Ps 94:7.)

Hymn. Summe Deus clementie.
Anon, 7th. c.
Trans. (performing Edition) in Monastic Matins.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition), J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 249, revised in Lauda Syon: [31].

Only the ‘Presta Pater’ doxology appears in the Breviary. It seems that ‘Presta Pater’ would have been the original, and that ‘Globr /ria tibi’ would have been introduced as a later variant for the period until February 2. However, at a still later date the Commemoration of Mary would have displaced the ferial Saturday Office on many occassions. This would be true also of the ferial Hymns of Friday Vespers and Saturday Lauds.

Chambers says ‘The following hymn is only said on the Saturday next before the First Sunday in Quadragesima, when it is the ordinary Saturday service.’

[293]
Ant. Quia mirabilia (Ps 97:1.)

[294]
Ant. Jubilate Deo (Ps 99:2.)

[295]
Ant. Clamor meus (Ps 101:2.) Gallican

[298]
Ant. Benedic anima mea (Ps 103:1.) Gallican

[301]
Ant. Visita nos Domine (Ps 105:4.)

[305]
Ant. Confitebor Domino (Ps 108:30.)

[307]
V. Domine exaudi (Ps 101:2) Gallican

Ant. Benigne fac (Ps 50:20.)

[308]
Ant. Bonum est confiteri (Ps 91:1.)

[309]
Ant. Metuant Dominum (Ps 66:7.)

Ant. Et in servis (Deut. 32:36.)

[312]
Ant. In cymbalis (Ps. 150:5.)

Hymn. Aurora jam spargit
Anon, 4th-5th c.
Trans. (Performing Edition) E. Caswall, in The English Hymnal, 57.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 264, revised in Lauda Syon: [33].

[313]
Ant. In viam pacis (Luke 1:79.)

[315]
Sunday at Vespers.
The image is of the Holy Trinity. Pater, Filius, and Spiritus Sanctus occupy the three corners; Deus occupies the centre. Between the corners ‘non est’, but connecting to the centre, ‘est’.

Ant. Sede a dextris. (Ps 109:1.)
The phrases of the text are reversed in comparison with the Bible.

[316]
Ant. Fidelia omnia (Ps 110:8.)

[317]
Ant. In mandatis ejus (Ps 111:1.) Gallican

Ant. Sit nomen Domini (Ps 112:2.)

[317]
Ant. Nos qui vivimus (Ps 113:26.)

[323]
Hymn. Lucis Creator optime
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) The Order of Vespers, 11.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer: 280, revised in Lauda Syon: [41].

The Vesper Hymns through the week recount the six days of creation and the day of rest.
Sunday: Lucis Creator optime. Light
Monday: Immense celi Conditor. The firmament.
Tuesday: Telluris ingens Conditor. The earth and the plants.
Wednesday: Celi Deus sanctissime. The sun and moon.
Thursday: Magnus Deus potentie. The birds and fishes.
Friday: Plasmator hominis. The animals and humankind.
Saturday: Deus Creator omnium. Rest.

[325]
V. Dirigatur Domine (after Ps 140:2.)

Proper Antiphons are provided for the Magnificat on every Sunday of the year.

[326]
Monday at Vespers
The image appears to be St. Michael on the left, standing over the slain dragon, and a guardian angel on the right, protecting a child.

Ant. Inclinavit (Ps 114:2.)

[327]
Ant. Credidi propter (Ps 115:1).

The beginning of the Vulgate Ps. 115 is verse 10 of Ps. 116 in the Hebrew and Book of Common Prayer versions.

Ant. Laudate Dominum (Ps 116:1.)

[328]
Ant. Clamavi (Ps 119:1.)

Ant. Auxilium (Ps 120:1.)

[329]
Hymn. Immense celi Conditor
Attributed to St. Gregory.
This melody is used for the other ferias as well.
Trans. (Performing Edtiion) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 55.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [45].

[331]
Ant. Magnificet te semper (after Luke 1:46.)
This is the first of a series of five ferial Antiphons based on the Magnificat for the weekday ferias:
Monday: Magnificet te semper. (after Luke 1:46.)
Tuesday: Exultavit spiritus meus. (after Luke 1:47.)
Wednesday: Respexisti humilitatem meam. (after Luke 1:48.)
Thursday: Deposuit potentes. (after Luke 1:52.)
Friday: Suscepit Deus Israel. (after Luke 1:54.)

(The Common Memorials on Ferias and Lesser Feasts that are found in this location in the Performing Edition appear at [189] in the Latin Edition and at [206] in the Scholarly Edition.)
[332]
Tuesday at Vespers
The image repeats that given at None. It appears to represent the faithful on earth aspiring to join the heavenly Jerusalem (cf. Ps 122.)

Ant. In domum Domini (Ps 121:1.)

[333]
Ant. Qui habitas (Ps 122:1.) Gallican

Ps. 122.
In the Vulgate, Coverdale, and Douay-Rheims Psalters, the second and third verses are joined into one.

Ant. Adjutorium nostrum (Ps 123:7.)

[334]
Ant. Benefac Domine (Ps 124:4.)

Ant. Facti sumus (Ps 125:1.)

[335]
Hymn. Telluris ingens Conditor
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted (1854), 57; as printed in The English Hymnal 59.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [47].

[337]
Ant. Exultavit spiritus meus (Luke 1:47.)

[338]
Wednesday at Vespers
The image is of Pentecost. This repeats the image of Terce.

Ant. Beatus vir (Ps 126:6.)
There seems to be no particular reason for the transposition of this Mode VIII. antiphon.

[339]
Ant. Beati omnes (Ps 127:1.)

Ant. Benediximus vobis (Ps 128:8.) Gallican

[340]
Ant. De profundis (Ps 129:1.)

[341]
Ant. Speret Israel (Ps 130:4.)

Hymn. Celi Deus sanctissime.
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 59.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [49].

[343]
Ant. Respexisti (Luke 1:48.)

[344]
Thursday at Vespers
The image depicts the Arma Christi or Instruments of the Passion.

Ant. Et omnis (Ps. 131:1.)
The Gallican and Old Roman forms have ‘ejus’, not ‘tuis’.

[345]
Ant. Ecce quam bonum (Ps. 132:1.)

Ps 133, omitted here, is sung daily at Compline.

[346]
Ant. Omnia quecunque (Ps. 134:6.)

[347]
Ant. Quoniam in eternum (Ps 135:1.) Gallican

[348]
Ant. Hymnum cantate (Ps 136:3.)

[349]
Hymn. Magne Deus potentie
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 61.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [51].

[350]
Ant. Deposuit potentes (Luke 1:52.)

[351]
Friday at Vespers
The image is of the Crucifixion.

Ant. In conspectu angelorum (Ps 137:1.)

[352]
Ant. Domine probasti (Ps 138:1.)

[353]
Ant. A viro iniquo (Ps 139:1.) Old Roman

[354]
Ant. Domine clamavi (Ps 140:1.)
Neither the Gallican nor the Old Roman has ‘et’

[355]
Portio mea (Ps 141:6.)

[356]
Hymn. Plasmator hominis Deus.
Attributed to St. Gregory.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnary Noted, 63.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon: [53].
The rubric explains that the hymn will only be sung on the Friday before the first Sunday of Lent. This is because on the preceding Fridays the service will be [First] Vespers of the Full Service of the Virgin. However, before the advent of the Office of the Virgin on Saturdays the hymn would have been sung on every Friday from the first Sunday after the Octave of the Epiphany until Lent, as indicated in Palmer, The Order of Vespers, p. 63.

[357]
Ant. Suscepit Deus (Luke 1:5.)

[358]
Psalm 142, omitted here, is sung on Fridays at Lauds.

[359]
Saturday at Vespers
The image is of the Stirps Jesse, the genealogy of Jesus. Presumably this is chosen in reference to the weekly commemoration of St. Mary on Saturdays.

Ant. Benedictus Dominus (Ps 143:1.)
The Psalm-Tone provided indicates that the intonation will be used, beginning at ‘Dominus Deus meus’. However, on page 7. the indication is that the intonation is omitted. It would seem that there is some variation in the practice.

[360]
Ant. In eternum (Ps 144:21.) Old Roman

[361]
Ant. Laudabo (Ps 145:2.)

[362]
Ant. Deo nostro (Ps 146:1.) Old Roman

[363]
Ant. Lauda Hierusalem (Ps 147:1.]
In the Hebrew Psalter this is a continuation of Ps. 147.

[364]
Hymn. Deus Creator omnium
Text by S. Ambrose.
The ‘winter’ Hymn.
Trans. (Performing Edition) John David Chambers, Lauda Syon: [55].
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) John David Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Sarum (1852), 324 (reprinted in The Order of Vespers: 73).)

[366]
Hymn. O Lux beata Trinitas.
Text by St. Ambrose.
The ‘summer’ Hymn.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 1.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) John David Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Sarum (1852), 325, revised in Lauda Syon: [56].
AH-LI: 40 (page 38).

J.D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Sarum (1852), 325, and Lauda Syon: [56] provides the following additional verses found in an Anglo-Saxon glossed hymnal of the mid 11th c. with 12th and 13th c. additions, ‘Vesp. D. xii., Cott. MSS., Brit. Museum.’ (Cotton MS Vespasian D XII: f4v.) The manuscript may have originated at Canterbury Cathedral. These verses, however, are not part of the Sarum tradition.

[3.] Jam noctis tempus advenit :
Quietam noctem tribue ;
Diluculo nos respice
De celo clementissime.

[4.] Tu Christe, solve vincula :
Absterge nostra vitia :
Relaxa prius crimina,
Et indulge facinora.

[5.] Oramus ut exaudias :
Precamur ut subvenias ;
Christe Jesu, omnipotens,
Tu nos a malo libera.

[3.] Now darkness falls on earth, do thou
A night of quiet rest bestow :
When morning breaks : from heaven thy throne,
On us most graciously look down !

[4.] O Christ, the chains of sin unbind :
Wash clean all vices from the mind :
From guilt that’s past our souls relieve,
And all our evil deeds forgive.

[5.] We pray thee hear thy suppliant’s call :
O help us, Saviour, e’er we fall ;
Christ Jesu, King of boundless might,
Shield us from every ill this night.

Hymnarium Sarisburiense, cum rubricis et notis musicis (London, 1851): 126, notes that these verses appear in the Mozarabic Breviary. This would be the Breviarium Gothicum secundum regulam beatissimi Isidori archiepiscopi Hispalensis (1775) 113. at the Second Sunday after the Octave of the Epiphany. See also Josephi Mariae Thomasii S. R. E. Cardinalis, Opera omnia II (Rome, 1747; H. A. Daniel, Thesaurus Hymnologicus, Halis, 1841.

[369]

An extensive study of the practice of Compline in English cathedrals, collegiate churches and college chapels is found in Mark Wayland Ardrey-Graves, ‘More Divine than Human’: Early Tudor Plainchant and Polyphony of the Lenten Compline Office in the Use of Salisbury, 1485-1558‘ DMA diss., James Madison University, 2015.

Completorium.
The image appears to be Jesus blessing a saintly queen.

V. Converte nos (Ps. 84:5.)

[370]
Compline 1. includes the ordinary parts of Compline plus the propers of Advent.

Ant. Miserere (Ps 4:2.)

Ps 30 is abbreviated here; only the first 6 verses of 26 are included. Clearly the intention is to include ‘In manus tuas . . .’ at Compline. The full Psalm is sung on Mondays at Matins.

[372]
Chap. Tu in nobis.
G. H. Palmer. (The Order of Compline:6) indicates that the Chapter is sung to the tone of simple versicles, i.e. F reciting tone with inflection to D, or to D-E. As yet I have not found found any sources to support this.

Hymn. Te lucis ante terminum
Anon, 7th century.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 9.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer (London: Joseph Masters, 1852): 356.
This is the ordinary Hymn throughout the year. The appropriate variable doxologies are not printed in the Breviarium 1531 or the Hymnale Sarum, or in the Antiphonale 1519.

[374]
V. Custodi nos Domine (after Ps 16:8.) Old Roman
This versicle is normally divided thus in non–Sarum use:
V. Cutodi nos Domine ut pupillam oculi.
R. Sub umbra alarum tuarum protege nos.

[375]
Cant. Nunc dimittis (Luke 2:29.)
I have not seen any evidence in the Sarum sources for the repetition of the intonation in subsequent verses at the Nunc dimittis, as is done by Helmore, Briggs and Frere, and Charles Winfred Douglas.

[376]
Ant. Estote parati (after Luke 12:40; 36.)

Hymn. Salvator mundi.
Trans. (Performing Edition) J. M. Neale, The Hymner, 107.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, Lauda Syon (London: J. Masters, 1866): 81.

[378]
Ant. Vigilate omnes (after Mark 13:33.)
It is very unusual for a Mode IV antiphon to descend to low A as this one does.

[379]
Ant. Natus est nobis (cf. Is. 9:6; Luke 2:11.)

[380]
Ant. Alleluya. Verbum caro (John 1:14.)

Ant. Nato Domino (after Apoc. 7:10)

[381]
Ant. Alleluya. Om/emnes de Saba. (Is. 60:6.)

[382]
Compline 6.
This is the ordinary Compline through the year.

[383]
Ant. Signatum est (Ps. 4:7.)

Resp. In pace in idipsum (Ps 4:9; V. Ps 131:4.) The R. is Gallican.

[384]
Hymn. Christe qui lux es et dies.
‘An Ambrosian hymn, quoted by Hinemar, Abp. of Rheims, in his treatise, Contra Godeschalcum. .. De und et non Trinâ Deitate, 857, thus fixing its date at an early period.’ John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) [hymnary.org]
Trans. (Performing Edition) W. J. Copeland and others, The English Hymnal, 81, except v. 3.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer (London: Joseph Masters, 1852): 364.

[386]
Ant. Cum videris (Is. 58:7.)

[387]
Ant. Media vita (V 1. After Ps 70:9.) Gallican

[389]
Resp. In manus tuas (Ps 30:6.)

Hymn. Cultor Dei
Text by Prudentius.
This Hymn is in the unusual metre 7.7.7.7 with occasional hypermetric syllables.
Trans. Thomas Alexander Lacey, The English Hymnal, 104.

[391]
Ant. Rex gloriose (cf. Jeremiah 14:9.)

[394]
Prayer. Spiritum in nobis
This is the final Prayer at the Easter Vigil and the Postcommunion for Easter Sunday.

[395]
Grad. Hec dies.
The use of the Easter Gradual at Compline is a departure from the normal form of Compline.

[396]
Hymn. Jesu salvator seculi
Attributed to Rabanus Maurus.
Trans. (Performing Edition) in The day-hours of the Church of England [F. Lygon], clxxvi.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer (London: Joseph Masters, 1852): 374.

[399]
Hymn. Jesu nostra redemptio.
Anon, 8th c.
Trans. (Performing Edition) John Chandler, The Hymns of the Primitive Church, 73; version from the Monastic Diurnal, 389.
Trans. (Scholarly Edition) J. D. Chambers, The Psalter, or Seven Ordinary Hours of Prayer (London: Joseph Masters, 1852): 376.

[400]
Ant. Alleluya. Ascendens Christus (Ephes. 4:8.)

[402]
Ant. Alleluya. Spiritus Paraclytus (cf. John 14:26.)

Seq. Alma Chorus.
This sequence also appears at the Feast of the Holy Name, but with a different text at the end.

[408]
Compline for the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus does not appear here in the 1531 Breviary. It is included here in the Performing Edition for convenience and completeness.

[408]
The Preces follow the form of those at Prime.

V. In pace in idipsum (Ps 4:9.)
see Compline 7.

[409]
V. Benedicamus Patrem
V. Benedictus es Domine
These two Versicles form the conclusion of the Canticle Benedicite [52].

[410]
The following Versicles are repeated from Prime [120].
V. Deus tu conversus (Ps 84:7-8.)

[411]
V. Fiat misericordia (Ps 32:22.)

V. Domine Deus virtutem (Ps 70:20.)

V. Domine exaudi orationem (Ps 101:2.)

[412]
V. Exaudi Domine vocem. (Ps 26:7.)

Ps. 50.
G. H. Palmer (The Order of Compline:11) indicates that on all ferias from Monday in the first week of Lent until Tuesday of Holy Week inclusive, in addition to Ps. 50, Ps. 142, Dominus exaudi. is also said, following directly, without note. I have not yet found any source for this indication.

V. Exurge Domine (Ps 43:26.)

V. Domine Deus virtutem (Ps 79:20.)

V. Domine exaudi orationem (Ps 101:2.)

Prayer. Illumina quesumus.

[414]
Pro pace ecclesie
The Service ‘For the Peace of the Church’ is separate from Compline proper. It is the the same as the morning Service ‘For the Peace of the Church’, [60].

Prayer. Ecclesie tue quesumus
Known as the Collect against the persecutors of Holy Mother Church.

[417]
Psalmi penitentiales.
The image is David espying Bethsheba in her bath: the quintessential sin of the Psalmist.

[425]
Sancte Dionisi may be rendered Saint Denys or Saint Dionysius in English.

[427]
The modern Roman and Tridentine, and 1529 Breviaries omit the line ‘In hora mortis succúrre nobis Dómine.’
‘Succurre’ replaces ‘libera’ here because we ask in this particular instance for succour (i.e. mercy) in death, rather than for deliverance from death.

[433]
Warren appears to be wrong in calling Donatian Donatus. The latter was a Benedictine monk living in Italy 1178-1198. Donatian was the Bishop & Martyr.

[434]
There are two ‘Sancte Germane’ in the Litany, one on Wednesday and one on Saturday. These would be Saint Germaine of Auxerre (378-448) (July 31) and Saint Germaine of Paris (496-576) (May 28).

[445]
Officium mortuorum.
The image depicts death as a skeleton. My interpretation is that death comes to the wealthy and respected in the prime of life, as to everyone else. There are three skeletons, one for each of the young men.

Ant. Placebo (Ps 114:9)
‘Placebo’ refers to Vespers of the Dead. (‘Dirige’ refers to Matins of the Dead.)

The abbreviated form of Ps. 114. is not found in the Breviarium Romanum  1529 or 1568.

[446]
Ant. Heu me quia incolatus. (Ps 119:5.) ‘me’ is from the Old Roman; ‘quia’ is from the Gallican.

Ant. Dominus custodit te (Ps 121:7)

Ant. Si iniquitates (Ps 130:3.)

[447]
Ant. Opera manuum tuarum (Ps 137:8.)

Ant. Audivi vocem (Apoc. 14:13.)
The York Use has the Antiphon Tuam Deus deposcimus.

[448]
Prayer. Deus cui propriam est misereri semper et parcere
This Prayer appears (varied) as the Collect for Mass for the Dead in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1610.

[449]
Prayer. Deus cui propriam est misereri semper
This Prayer appears (varied) as a Collect for the Dead in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1627.

The thirtieth day is also known as the ‘month’s mind’. The Anniversary of death is also known as the ‘obit.’, or ‘yearday’, or ‘twelve-months day’, or ‘year’s mind’.

Prayer. Deus indulgentiarum.
This Prayer appears (varied) as the Collect for the Second Mass of All Souls Day in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1490.

Prayer. Deus venie largitor.
This Prayer appears (varied) as the Collect for the Third Mass of All Souls Day in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1491.

Prayer. Fidelium Deus.
This Prayer appears (varied) as the Collect for the First Mass of All Souls Day in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1485.

[450]
Non Sarum forms of Matins of the Dead, such as Liber Usualis, 1779, begin with the Invitatory Psalm. The Sarum form begins directly with the first Psalm-Antiphon, ‘Dirige’ hence the familiar name for this service, Dirige, or ‘Dirge’.

Ant. Dirige Domine (Ps 5:8.)

[451]
Ant. Convertere Domine (Ps 6:4.)

Ant. Nequando rapiat (Ps 7:3.)

[452]
Resp. Credo quod Redemptor meus (after Job 19:25.)
The Matins Responsories of the Sarum series match those of York, with the exceptions noted below. (See Matthew Cheung Salisbury, The Use of York (York: Borthwick Publications, 2008):17.) The Herford series is identical with Sarum.

[453]
Lectio. Tedet animam
It appears that the special ending provided here is because the reading ends with an interrogative.

Resp. Qui Lazarum
The York Use has the Verse ‘Requiem eternam’.

[454]
Resp. Domine quando veneris (see Chronicles 21:8.)

[455]
The rubric is a reminder that when the Gloria Patri is omitted, as in the Office of the Dead, the Responsory will be repeated after the repetendam.

Ant. In loco pascue (Ps 22:2.)
DR : He hath set me in a place of pasture.

[456]
Ant. Delicta juventutis mee (Ps 24:7.)

Ant. Credo videre (Ps 26:13.)

V. In memoria eterna (Ps 111:7.)

[457]
Resp. Heu michi Domine (V: Ps 6:4.)
Although the music of the V begins in the usual way, the ending is different. Compare Worcester F-160. Liber Usualis, 1792. The modification gives a better connection to the repetendum.

[458]
Resp. Ne recorderis (V: after Ps 5:9.)

[459]
Resp. Domine secundum actum meum (V: Ps 50:2, 4.) Old Roman
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Libera me Domine . . . inferni’.

[460]
Ant. Complaceat tibi (Ps 40:16.)

Ant. Sana Domine (Ps 40:5.)

Ant. Sitivit anima mea (Ps 41:3.)

[462]
Resp. Requiem eternam
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Deus eterne in cujus’.

[463]
Resp. Libera me Domine
On All soul’s day all the verses would be included.
In V 5, ‘in sinu Abrahe’ is from Luke 16-22.
This Responsory appears to serve as the inspiration for the presumably 13th century Sequence ‘Dies irae’, not only in text, but also in melody, seeing that the Responsory Verse begins in the same way as the opening of the ‘Dies irae’ melody.

[467]
V. Complaceat tibi (Ps 39:14.)

[468]
Ant. Exultabunt Domino (Ps 50:10.)

Ant. Exaudi Domine (Ps 64:2.)

Ant. Me suscepit (Ps 62:9.)

[469]
Ant. A porta inferi
The York and Hereford Uses have the Antiphon ‘Eruisti Domine’

Ant. Omnis spiritus (Ps 150:6.)

Ant. Ego sum resurrectio (John 11:25.)

[471]
Prayer. Inclina Domine aurem tuam
This Prayer appears (varied) as the Collect for a deceased man in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1623.

[472]
Prayer. Deus qui nos patres et matres honorare
This Prayer appears (varied) as a Collect for the Dead in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1625.

Prayer Animabus quesumus Domine omnium fidelium defunctorum
This Prayer appears (varied) as a Postcommunion for the Dead in the Roman Catholic Daily Missal, 1962, page 1489.

[473]
A clearer version of the same image in the Sarum Diurnal, 1512, shows that the penitent Christian is facing his mortality, represented by the skeleton on the left.

[475]
Service of the Blessed Virgin
This spoken service (i.e. recto tono) is also known as the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin, in contrast to the Full Service of the Blessed Virgin, which is sung (see [484].).
Although it shares many elements, this service is nevertheless distinct from the ‘Hours of the Virgin’ as found in Primers and Books of Hours.
For background on this Office see William J. Lallou, ‘The Little Office of Our Lady’ (The American Ecclesiastical Review, August, 1949): 100–110.

Vespers of Saint Mary in Advent

The image is of the Annunciation. It is much more common in such images for the angel to be on the left and Mary on the right.

Ant. Prophete predicaverunt
This text is also used for the second Antiphon at Lauds on Wednesday of the third week of Advent, and as the first Antiphon at Matins of the Annunciation.

The daily Psalms at Vespers are those of Tuesday in the principal office, except on Tuesday, when three of Sunday, one of Wednesday, and one of Thursday are used, thereby avoiding duplication of the psalms on a single day.

Ant. Ne timeas Maria (after Luke 1:30-31.)

[476]
Prayer. Concede nos famulos tuos
This is the Prayer for the Mass ‘Salve sancte parens’, the Votive Mass for Saint Mary from the Purification to Advent.

Memorial of the Saint of the Place
. . . ut in prebendis vel in aliis ecclesiis parrochialibus . . .
In the case of Salisbury Cathedral and other places dedicated in honour of the Virgin this Memorial is omitted.

The Memorial of All Saints is said if it is part of the said Office of the Virgin, but is sung (see p. 24) if it is part of the Sung Office, i.e. when the Choir is not Ruled.

V. Ecce apparebit Dominus (after Apoc. 14:14.)

[477]
Compline of Saint Mary in Advent
This Office also appears in the Temporale at p. 36.

Ant. Beata es Maria (after Luke 1:45.)

Hymn. Virgo singularis.
Stanzas 5-7 of Ave maris stella.

Ant. Ecce ancilla Domini (Luke 1:38.)

[478]
Matins of Saint Mary in Advent

Invit. Ave Maria gratia plena (after Luke 1:28.)

Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus (after Luke 1:28.)

Ant. Specie tua (Ps. 44:5.)

[479]
Resp. Missus est Gabriel (after Luke 1:26-32.)
This Responsory also appears at the third of the First Sunday of Advent.

Resp. Ave Maria gratia plena (after Luke 1:28-34.)
This Responsory also appears at the fourth of the First Sunday of Advent.

[480]
Resp. Suscipe verbum (cf. Luke 1:28.)
This Responsory also appears at the fifth of the First Sunday of Advent.

Lauds of Saint Mary in Advent

Ant. Spiritus Sanctus in te (after Luke 1:35.)

[481]
Ant. Missus est Gabriel (after Luke 1:26-32.)

[482]
Angelus Domini nunciavit
This is the opening Versicle of the ‘Angelus’.

Ant. Ave Maria gratia plena (after Luke 1:28.)

[484]
Full Service of Blessed Mary in Advent
Extensive rubrics appear on page 127.
This is the weekly sung Commemoration of Saint Mary, which normally takes the place of the ferial office on Saturday. If a Feast is to be sung on Saturday, then the Full Service of Saint Mary will be sung on an earlier day in the week, or will be omitted that week if no suitable day is available. The Commemoration of Saint Mary has no Second Vespers, since this will invariably be of the following Sunday or Feast.

[486]
The Service of Blessed Mary after the Nativity of the Lord
This is the Little (said) Office of the Virgin. It commences on the Octave day of St. Stephen. (See p. 512.)

The image is of the Nativity.

Resp. Misericordiam et judicium.
This is the First Responsory on Saturday after ‘Domine ne in ira’. This would appear to be an indication that the Responsories of the Saturday feria were to be used, seeing that they would be omitted on the Saturday itself where the Full Service of Saint Mary is sung. If these Responsories were said at the Commemoration of St. Mary, it would seem more appropriate that they be used in the period following the Octave of the Epiphany.

Resp. Sancta et immaculata.
This ‘non Sarum’ series of Responsories are those that would be sung at the Full Service of St. Mary after the Epiphany. These are the Responsories that appear in the Sarum Primers.

(Alternatively the Responsories from the Advent series [479]. could be said instead.)

[488]
Ant. Exultabunt sancti in gloria. (Ps. 149:5.)
This would be said at the said Office of the Virgin, or would be sung at the sung Office of the day.

[491]
Ant. Completi sunt dies (after Luke 2:6.)

Ant. Ecce completa sunt (after Luke 1:45.)

[493]
Full Service of Blessed Mary from the Octave of Epiphany until the Purification

[494]
Hymn. Enixa est puerpera
Text: Caelius Sedulius (d. ca. 450).
Trans. J. M. Neale. (In The Hymnal Noted: 14, the text begins ‘That Son, the Royal Son she bore’.)
This Hymn comprises stanzas 5 and 7 of the Christmas Hymn ‘A solus ortus’, plus a doxology. (Stanza 7 does not appear in the Sarum versions at Christmas.)
The tune is the proper melody for ‘A solus ortus’.

[496]
Hymn. Caste parentis viscera
Text: Caelius Sedulius (d. ca. 450).
Trans. J. M. Neale.
This Hymn comprises stanzas 3 and 4 of the Christmas Hymn ‘A solus ortus’, plus a doxology.
The tune is the proper melody for ‘A solus ortus’.

[497]
Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus (after Luke 1:28.)

[498]
Ant. Sicut mirra electa (after Sir. 24:20.)

Ant. Speciosa facta es (cf. Cant. 7:6).

Ant. Specie tua (Ps. 44:5.)

[499]
Ant. Adjuvabit eam Deus (after Ps. 45:6.)

Ant. Sicut letantium (after Ps. 86:7.)

Lectio. Parturiente Maria
Trans. WR.

[501]
Resp. Sancta et immaculata (V. after Luke 1:28.)

[503]
Resp. Beata es Maria (V. after Luke 1:28-34.)

[504]
Resp. Te laudant angeli (cf. Luke 1:28.)

[517]
The Commemoration of St. Thomas of Canterbury

Lessons. Dormiente cum patribus suis
Trans. WR.

The Responsories are taken from the Principal Feast, December 29.

[521]
The Translation of Saint Chad

[522]
Sermon. Iste locus evangelicus
Trans. WR. Another translation appears at New Advent: Fathers of the Church: Tractates on the Gospel of John (Augustine): Tractate 80.

[524]
The Commemoration of Saint Chad

Lessons. Temporibus igitur Oswy Northanhimbrorum regis
Trans. WR.

[527]
The Feast of the Image of the Saviour
This feast is rarely found in the medieval sources. In CANTUS, only I-far (Florence) contains the feast. Of the 22 chants in I-far, only 13 items are in common with the 29 chants of the Sarum office.
For the most part the chants are neither in rhyme or meter, although there are exceptions: Antiphons 2 and 5 at First Vespers are very rhythmic; the third Antiphon is fully rhymed and metered.
Although no date for this Feast appears in the Sarum Kalendars, it does appear on November 9 in the Roman Martyrology and in the Aberdeen Breviary.

[534]
Lessons. Levate oculos sensus vestri
Trans. WR

[548]
The fact that there is no ninth responsory would be evidence that this Office does not originate with Sarum.

[553]
In Commemoration of Saint Etheldreda

Lessons. In presentis vite et fluctuantis seculi
Trans. WR

[555]
The Presentation of the Virgin Mary [November 21]
This office was first celebrated (in the west) on November 21, 1372. Pope Sixtus IV first placed the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary on the universal calendar in 1472, but in the 1568 Tridentine reform of the calendar Pope Pius V removed the feast. It was restored 17 years later by Pope Sixtus V, and remains in the Roman calendar today as a memorial.
The Office normally does not appear in Sarum Kalendars, but it does appear in the Kalendar of the Aberdeen Breviary.

The Office appears to be the work (1372) of Philippe de Mézières (1327-1405). See William Emmet Coleman, ed. Philippe de Mézières’ Campaign for the Feast of Mary’s Presentation (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1981): 55 ff.

In the absence of Sarum sources for the chants, the music has been taken from DK-Kk 3449 8o I Augsburg, 1580.

The chants are in metre and rhyme.

[558]
Hymn. O Dei sapientia
Anon. 15th? c.
Trans. John David Chambers, Laude Syon: Ancient Latin Hymns of the English and Other Churches (London: J. Masters, 1866):II: 64. Another translation appears in The Anglican Breviary: E80.
The Melody (following DK-13:86v.) is the Sarum tune associated with Feasts and Commemorations of the Blessed Virgin. (See [93].)

[559]
V. Presentatio est hodie
This V. is adapted from V. ‘Nativitas est hodie’ CANTUS-008143 (which does not appear in the Sarum sources).

[561]
Hymn. Sacre parentes virginis
Anon. 15th? c. See AH-IV: 79.
The Melody (following DK:91r.) is the Sarum tune associated with Feasts and Commemorations of the Blessed Virgin. (See [93].)

[563]
V. Specie tua (Ps. 44:5.)

Lessons. Que est ista puella mater
Trans. WR.

. . . Quid autem putas qualis . . . Fulbert of Chartres, PL-141:322.
. . . In malivolam animam . . . after Sap. 1:4.

[564]
. . . Inveni virum secundum cor meum. Acts 13:22.
. . . Quoddam itaque siderum micat . . . after Bernard of Clairvaux, PL-183:433.
. . . sacerdotalis virga . . . cf. Num. 17:8; Ezech. 7:10.
. . . hanc Gedeonis vellus . . . cf. Jud. 6:37.
. . . orientalis porta . . . cf. Ezek. 10:19, 44:1-2.
. . . radice Jesse . . . cf. Isaiah 11:1.

[565]
. . . meritorum prerogativis . . . cf. Pseudo-Jerome, PL-30:129.
. . . Hec est enim que totius mundi . . . cf. Bernard of Clairvaux, In Assumptione, Opera Omnia IV-8:428.
. . . Logitudino enim ipsius . . . cf. Ps. 32:5; 118:64.
. . . sedentibus in tenebris . . . cf. Ps. 87:7; 106:10, 14; Luke 1:79.

[566]
. . . Virgo erat corpore . . . Ambrose, De virginitate II libro, Chap. 2:6-7; PL-16:208C, 209B.

[567]
. . . O plena gratiarum . . . Bernard, Serm. inf. Oct. Assumpt. BVM super signum magnum, Opera Omnia III:2166.
. . . sed et camelis potum . . . cf. Gen. 24:14 ff.
. . . Offerentur inquit virgines . . . cf. Ps. 44:15.

[569]
V. Adjuvabit eam (cf. Ps. 45:6, Old Roman.)

. . . a nullo virtutum genere . . . Fulbert of Chartres, PL-141: 322.

[570]
. . . quanto devotionis affectu . . . Bernard of Clairvaux, PL-183: 441.

[571]
. . . ortus plane deliciarum . . . Op. cit.
. . . ut undique fluant . . . Cant. 4:16.
. . . tanta gratia est repleta . . . Jerome, PL-20:129.
. . . gratiosior=gloriosior, PL-20:129.

[572]
. . . singulas virtutes in ea prorsus . . . Bernard of Clairvaux, In assumptione BVM, Serm. IV. De quatriduo Lazari, et praeconio virginis, Cap. 6.
. . . angelo filium promittente . . . cf. Luke 1:31.
. . . ascendit denique in montana . . . cf. Luke 1:39.
. . . Fervebat siquidem in querenda . . . Benard, Op. omnia II: 443.
. . . Que est ista . . . Cant. 3:6; 8:5.

[575]
Homily. Audistis, fratres charissimi, Dominice incarnationis.
Apparently the work of St. Peter Damian (c. 1007–1072 or 1073), Sermo XLVI Homilia in nativitate BVM VIII. Sept., PL-144:748.
Trans. WR.
. . . Liber generationes . . . Mat. 1:1.
. . . in semine tuo benedicetur . . . cf. Gen 22:18; 26:4; 28:46.
. . . Non dixit seminibus . . . cf. Gal. 3:16.

[576]
. . . De fructu ventris tui . . . cf. Ps. 131:11.

[577]
. . . Semel juravi in sancto meo . . . cf. Ps. 88:36.
. . . Cum dormieris cum patribus . . . cf. II Kings 7:12.

[578]
. . . Qui mortuus est propter peccata . . . cf. Rom. 4:25.
. . . Quod autem ascendit quid est . . . cf. Eph. 4:9.

[585]
Hymn. Omnes fideles plaudite
Anon, 14th? c. See AH-4: 76.
The Melody (supplied by the editor) is the Sarum tune associated with Feasts and Commemorations of the Blessed Virgin. (See [93].)

[590]
The Deeds of the Presentation of Blessed Mary
This text is from the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, Chapters 1-6. (Tischendorf, ed., Evangelia apocrypha (Leipzig: Mendelssohn, 1876): 54.
Another translation appears in New Advent: The Fathers of the Church: The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew.
See also James Keith Elliott, A Synopsis of the Apocryphal Nativity and Infancy Narratives, Second Edition (Leiden: Brill, 2016).

[639]
Hymn. Annue Christe seculorum Domine
Anon. The oldest sources appear to stem from 10th.-11th. c. Britain (Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology: 70). It appears in only 9 non-Sarum sources in CANTUS. See AH-51: 107. AH gives considerable detail concerning sources and variants.
The Hymn has a unique form which combines nine stanzas proper to festivals of saints with the four ordinary stanzas printed here.

Hymns for apostles table

It is notable that in the Sarum sources there is no proper stanza for St. Barnabas or St. Luke. St. Barnabas, not being one of the ‘twelve’ is not always counted among the Apostles (although he is so named in Acts 14:14, and so categorized in the Sarum and Roman sources). St. Luke certainly has full status as an Evangelist, and would warrant a proper stanza.

Stanzas for St. Philip, St. Barnabas, St. Luke, St. James, and St. John (non Sarum) appear in (AH-51: 107.)

St. Mark
Marce, sacerdos levitici ordinis,
Precibus tuis nos a cunctis vinculis
Solve reatus, hoc ut pius Dominus
Nobis concedat, quod sana mens obsecrat.

St. Philip
Proni rogamus, Philippe, os lampadis,
Pias caelestis aures pulsa judicis,
Ut, quae meremur, repellat supplicia
Et, quae precamur, det superna gaudia.

St. Barnabas
Praeco benigne et decus ecclesiae,
Barnaba sancte, cernat ut miserias,
Supplica Christum, patimur quas merito,
Revela sanctis nosque tuis precibus.

St. James
Jacobe juste, Jesu frater Domini,
Sit tibi pia super nos compassio,
Quos reos fecit superba jactantia
Atque foedavit mundi petulantia.

St. Luke
Luca, fidelis dator Christi dogmatis,
Spretor carnalis integer cupidinis,
Medice docte corporis et animae,
Sana veterna aegri cordis vulnera.

The following stanza appears in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaf in Zurich, XXII (1886): 161.

St. John
Johannes virgo, dilecte a Domino!
Ipsum pro nobis deprecare sedulo,
Quo expiemur ab omni corruptela
Et angelorum perfruamur gloria.

Trans. Thomas A. Lacey (The English Hymnal: 174.)
Another translation, ‘Monarch of ages’, appears in Palmer, The Order of Vespers: 10*; Another translation, by J. M. Neale, ‘O Christ, thou Lord of worlds’, appears in The Hymnal Noted: #86.
This Hymn appears in the York Breviary.
This Hymn is not part of the regular Roman cursus.

Palmer, The Order of Vespers: 10* suggests that the proper stanza, when one is to be had, appear as the second stanza.  This procedure is also used in Skinner, The Daily Service Hymnal (1861).  However the implication from the Sarum sources is that any proper stanza comes in the first place.

This Hymn may have been the inspiration for Horatio Nelson’s ‘From all thy saints in warfare’ (1864), which includes 17 proper stanzas for saints, framed by two general stanzas and a doxology.  (Nelson was editor of The Salisbury Hymn Book (1857), revised as The Sarum Hymnal, 1868.–see #297.)

[723]
On the birthday of Many Martyrs outside of Eastertide

Hymn. Sanctorum meritis
There is an extensive article on this Hymn in the Catholic Encyclopedia.

[921]

Ordinary of the Mass.

The vesting rite follows the form of a Memorial (Antiphon, Versicle, Prayer), using a Hymn instead of an Antiphon.