Companion to B: Temporale – part 2

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1577
Trinity
Major Double Feast
Thomas Becket’s first act after his consecration as Archbishop of Canterbury on the Sunday after Pentecost, 1162 was to ordain that the day of his consecration be held as a festival in honour of the Holy Trinity. This observance spread from Canterbury throughout the whole of western Christendom. Pope John XXII extended this observance to the whole of the Western Church 1334.

The image (from the Breviary, 1531) represents heaven and earth. The text is excerpted from the ‘Te Deum’. The upper portion features the Father and the Son with a Dove representing the Holy Spirit.  It would appear that the Father and Son are holding an open book, possibly representing the Law.  Surrounding the Godhead are angels and the heavenly host. In the lower portion the Church is portrayed as the portal of heaven, to which clergy (on the left, led by a pope and bishops) and lay (on the right, led by a king and nobles) are flocking in attitudes of prayer.

The Office was composed by Stephen of Liège (850-920).
It would seem that this office was celebrated by the Anglo-Saxon Church by the early 11th century. (Barbara C. Raw, ‘The Office of the Trinity in the Crowland Psalter’ Anglo Saxon England XXVIII (1999): 185-186. (Note that Barbara Raw casts doubt that this is the in fact the office composed by Stephen of Liege (p. 187).)
This is the earliest Office in the Sarum Use that contains substantial versified elements. This seems to be also the only versified office that was retained in the Breviarium Romanum 1568 of the Tridentine reform.
The Office composed by John Peckham (Archbishop of Canterbury 1279-92), appears in the Franciscan influenced Breviarium Romanum, 1529. In the Dominican influenced Breviarium Romanum 1568, the Trinity Office is based on that by Stephen of Liège.
See Kate Helsen, ‘Two Trinity Offices Compared’, William Renwick, ed., Chant Old and New/Plain-Chant: l’ancien et le nouveau (Lion’s Bay: The Institute of Medieval Music, 2012):149-187, and Barbara C. Raw, ‘The Office of the Trinity in the Crowland Psalter’ Anglo Saxon England XXVIII (1999): 185-200.

First Vespers
1 Ant. Gloria tribi Trinitas
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (8.8.8.8). It appears as a doxology to the Lenten hymns in the Anglo-Saxon ‘Canterbury Hymnal’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 114v-115v. It also appears in the late 10th c. Bosworth Psalter, BL MS Add 37517:115r, 126r. See Gernot R. Wieland, The Canterbury Hymnal (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1982): 72-75. It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

1578
2 Ant. Laus et perennis gloria
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (8.8.8.8). It appears as the doxology for the hymn ‘Deus tuorum militum’ in the ‘Canterbury Hymnal’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 126r (Wieland, p. 123), and concludes the same hymn in the pre and post-Tridentine Roman traditions (e.g. Breviarium Romanum (Paris, 1529), fo C-60r; Breviarium Romanum (Rome, 1568): 900. It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

3 Ant. Gloria laudis resonet in ore
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (11.11.11.5). It appears as the doxology of the hymn ‘Christe Salvator hominis’ for St. Vedast by Alcuin (c. 735 804)(AH-L, #109, p. 154-155.). It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

1579
4 Ant. Laus Deo Patri geniteque proli
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (11.11.11.5). It appears in AH-4:46 as the doxology to the hymn ‘Virga de Jesse generata stirpe’. It shares text elements with the doxology ‘Gloria Patri geniteque proli’ attached to the hymn for virgins, ‘Viriginis proles’, which text is also used for Responsory 5 (below). The common text in CANTUS begins ‘Laus Deo Patri parilique proli’.

5 Ant. Ex quo omnia (cf. I Cor 8:6; Rom. 11:36.)
The text is based on Augustine (Confessions 1.2.2) ‘ex quo omnia, per quem omnia, in quo omnia’ (‘of whom are all things, by whom are all things, in whom are all things’). It is echoed in Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55: ‘A quo, per quem, in quo omnia, o beata Trinitas.’

1580
Hymn. Adesto Sancta Trinitas
Being that the earliest record of this hymn is an 11th c. manuscript (British Library Vesp. D. xii. f. 115b.), it is not entirely clear whether this hymn is part of the original office composed by Stephen of Liège. See John Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology (New York: Scribner’s, 1892): 22.

1581
V. Benedicamus Patrem
This is a doxological verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53].

Ant. Gratias tibi Deus
In William Laud, Works, (Oxford: John Henry Parker, 1853) III: 62), this text is described as coming from St. Augustine’s Orat. de 5. Heures, cap. vii.g., the first part of a Prayer: ‘Gratias tibi Deus ; Gratias tibi vera et una Trinitas, una et trina Veriatas, trina et una Unitas. Gratias tibi, Deus Pater, qui Filium tuum ostendisti, et mihi doctorem dedisti. O et semper des in misericordia antiquis. Amen.’
This text is found in Hincmar of Rheims (806-882), ‘De una et non trina deitate’ (PL-125 0510D) II.

1582
Matins

Invit. Deum verum unum
This Invitatory text appears in the Portiforium Wulstani II:48, and in the Hyde Breviary II:130r.

1583
1 Ant. Adesto Deus unus omnipotens
This text appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

2 Ant. Te Unum in substantia
This text (like the previous one) appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

3 Ant. Te semper idem esse vivere
This text (like the previous two) appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

1584
Lesson. Credimus Sanctam Trinitatem
The first six Lessons are taken from Alcuin’s (ca. 735–804) De fide Sanctae Trinitatis et de incarnatione Christi. See PL 101:56-58.
Trans. WR.
In the Breviarium Romanum 1529 the Lessons are from Isaiah, Augustine, and Gregory of Nanzianus.

1 Resp. Benedicat nos Deus (Ps. 66:7-8; 2.)

1585
2 Resp. Benedictus Dominus Deus Israel (Ps. 71:18-19. (Gallican))

1587
3 Resp. Quis Deus magnus (Ps. 76:14-16. (Gallican))

4 Ant. Te invocamus
This is the first of eight pieces in this office that conclude with ‘o beata Trinitas’. The other are the following five Antiphons, the seventh Responsory, and the fifth Antiphon of Lauds.
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

1588
5 Ant. Spes nostra
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

6 Ant. Libera nos
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

Verse. Benedictus es Domine (Dan. 3:56.)

1589
4 Resp. Magnus Dominus (Ps. 146:5 (Gallican); 144:3.)
This Responsory, though strictly Biblical, contains elements of rhyme and metre.

1590
5 Resp. Gloria Patri geniteque proli
The text is a hymn-doxology in the form of a Sapphic stanza (11.11.11.5). It typically appears at the conclusion of the hymn for virgins, ‘Virginis proles opifexque matris’. [847].
The Verse (8.8.8.8) is the second strophe is some versions of the hymn ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’, but is apparently not part of the original hymn. See John Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology (New York: Scribner’s, 1892): 1207.

1591
6 Resp. Honor virtus et potestas

1592
7 Ant. Charitas Pater est
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

8 Ant. Verax est Pater
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

1593
9 Ant. Una igitur Pater
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

Verse. Verbo Domini (Ps. 32:6.)

Homily. Sicut ex lectione sancti evangelii
This Homily appears in The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede, Vol. V. Homilies (ed. J. A. Giles) (London: Whittaker & co, 1843): 109. Its attribution to Bede is in question.
Trans. WR.
Another English translation appears in Lawrence T. Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable: Homilies on the Gospels (Cistercian Publications) 2.18.

1594
7 Resp. Tibi laus tibi gloria (V. Dan. 3:52.)
The text of the Responsory is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:55.

1595
8 Resp. Benedicamus Patrem et Filium
The Responsory is a doxological Verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53].
The Verse. (Dan. 3:56.) is also from the ‘Benedicite’.
Both of these texts are used as Versicles in this Office.

1596
9 Resp. Summe Trinitati

1597
Verse. Benedictus es Domine
This is repeated from the Second Nocturn.

Lauds
The Antiphons at Lauds have Verses, as are commonly found in this Office.
1 Ant. O beata et benedicta
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria

1598
2 Ant. O beata benedicta gloriosa
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Miserere miserere

3 Ant. O vera summa sempiterna
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the first Antiphon.

1599
4 Ant. O vera summa sempiterna
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Miserere miserere
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the second Antiphon.

5 Ant. Te jure laudant
This Antiphon also appears at Prime on Sundays, where it is attached to the ‘Quicunque vult’. While the text follows the style of the previous Antiphons, its origin has yet to be identified.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the first and third Antiphons.

1600
Hymn. O Pater sancte mitis
Author unknown. Sapphic stanza, 11 11 11 5.

1601
Verse. Sit nomen Domini (Ps. 112:2.)

1603
Resp. Benedicamus Patrem
This is a doxological Verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53]. See the Verse at First Vespers.

1604
Resp. Benedictus es Domine (Dan. 3:56.)
This text is repeated from the Versicle of the Second Nocturn.

1605
Resp. Verbo Domini (Ps. 32:6.)
This text is repeated from the Versicle of the Third Nocturn.

1606
Ant. Te Deum Patrem ingenitum
This Antiphon also appears at Prime on Sundays, where it is attached to the ‘Quicunque vult’.

1607
Ferias after Trinity
Lessons. Confitemur et credimus sanctam
These three readings are taken from the spurious De Trinitate confessio (PL 12 0958D) ascribed to Eusebius Vercellensis (283–371).
The Lessons are taken from the Eleventh Council of Toledo Symbol of Faith, November 7, 675.

1609
Corpus Christi
Major Double Feast

At First Vespers
1 Ant. Sacerdos in eternum

1610
2 Ant. Miserator Dominus

3 Ant. Calicem salutaris accipiam

4 Ant. Sicut novelle olivarum

1611
5 Ant. Qui pacem ponit

Chapter. Dominus Jesus in qua nocte

Resp. Homo quidam fecit
This Melody is used as the tenor in Tallis’ motet ‘Homo quidam fecit’.

1612
Hymn. Sacris solemnis
In the Penpont Antiphonal ff 131v and 132r, the Hymn ‘Pange lingua’ (of Matins) appears in place of ‘Sacris solemnis’, and vice versa.

1614
V. Panem de celo

Ant. O quam suavis

1615
Prayer. Deus qui nobis sub sacramento

At Matins
Invit. Christum Regem adoremus

1616
Hymn. Pange lingua
In the Penpont Antiphonal ff 131v and 132r, the Hymn ‘Sacris solemnis’ (of First Vespers) appears in place of ‘Pange lingua’, and vice versa.

1618
1 Ant. Fructum salutiferum

2 Ant. A fructu frumenti

1619
3 Ant. Communione calicis

V. Panem celi

Lessons. Immensa divine largitatis

1620
1 Resp. Immolabit hedum

1621
2 Resp. Comedetis carnes

1622
3 Resp. Respexit Helyas

1623
4 Ant. Memor sit Dominus

5 Ant. Paratur nobis mensa Domini

1624
In voce exultationis

V. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

1625
4 Resp. Panis quem ego dabo

1626
5 Resp. Cenantibus illis

1627
6 Resp. Accepit Jesus calicem

1628
7 Ant. Introibo ad altare Dei

1629
8 Ant. Cibavit nos Dominus

9 Ant. Ex altari tuo

V. Educas panem de terra

1630
Sermon of Augustine. Cum vero cibo et potu

7 Resp. Qui manducat meam carnem

1631
8 Resp. Misit me Pater vivens

1632
9 Resp. Unus panis et unum corpus

1633
Before Lauds
V. Panem de celo

At lauds
1 Ant. Sapientia edificavit

2 Ant. Angelorum esca nutrivisti

1634
3 Ant. Pinguis est panis

4 Ant. Sacerdotes sancti incensum

5 Ant. Vincenti dabo manna

1635
Hymn. Verbum supernum prodiens

1636
V. Posuit fines tuos pacem

1637
Ant. Ego sum panis vivus

At Terce

1638
Resp. Panem celi dedit eis

V. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

At Sext
Chapter. Quotienscunque manducabitis

Resp. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

1639
V. Educas panem de terra

At None
Chapter. Quicunque manducaverit panem

Resp. Educas panem de terra

1640
V. Posuit fines tuos pacem

At Second Vespers
Ant. O sacrum convivium

Friday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Saturday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Sunday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Before the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi, this day was ‘Deus omnium’, the first of the ordinary Sundays of the ‘Summer’ Season. With the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi with Octave,

Monday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Tuesday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Wednesday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

The Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Second Sunday after the Feast of the Trinity
Since the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi with Octave, this Sunday has become ‘Deus omnium’ the first of the ordinary Sundays of the summer season.

1717
Invit. Laudemus Jesum Christum quia
This Invitatory is unique to Sarum in CANTUS. Related is also ‘Laudemus Jesum Christum in conversions’ {202} for the Feast of St. Paul.

1798
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of August
Minor Privileged Sunday

1825
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of September
Minor Privileged Sunday

1848
First Sunday after the Third of the Ides of September
Minor Privileged Sunday

1869
First Sunday after the Twelfth of the Kalends of October
Minor Privileged Sunday

1889
First Sunday after the fifth the Kalends of October
Minor Privileged Sunday

1927
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of November
Minor Privileged Sunday

2018
Feast of the Dedication of the Church
Principal Double Feast

The days within the Octave and the Octave Day of the Dedication are with Rulers of the Choir, provided that the Feast falls outside of Advent and Septuagesimatide.