Companion to B: Temporale

Title page of the Sarum Antiphonale 1519-1520
The upper panel represents the Virgin and Child together with the three kings, patrons of the city of Cologne.  The arms of the city of Cologne are in the upper left corner; the device of the printer, Francis Byrckman in the upper right.  The central panel represents Saint Ursula and the eleven thousand virgins, reputededly martryed at Cologne.  The lower panel represents the Maccabees, martyrs, for whom a shrine was kept at the Church of Saint Andrew, Cologne. (Procter and Wordsworth, Breviarium ad usum Sarum, Vol. III, p. lxxi.)

1
The Rubrics, or Pie, orignally a separate volume, have been distributed through the course of the Temporale where it is most convenient. They indicate the principal events in the calendar for each year beginning with a different day of the week (A-G). During the season of the moveable feasts (Septuagesima through to Deus omnium) the possible arrangements of the calendar are multiplied to 35 on account of the potential for Easter to fall on any day between March 22 and April 25.

Each ‘history’ is identified by the incipit of the first Responsory of Matins. The Advent ‘history’ Isaiah is named by the responsory Aspiciens a longe.

4
The image is of the Annunciation.

5
First Sunday of Advent
Principal Privileged Sunday

The image is of the Annunciation. These images are unusual in that they include a crowd of onlookers. More typically the Annunciation is portrayed as a private event.

Ave Maria.   cf. Luke 1:28.
In the Breviary 1531, the Ave Maria prayer includes the non-scriptural continuation, ‘Sancta Maria, mater Dei, ora pro nobis’ &c, whereas most other Sarum sources omit this continuation.

6
V. Deus in adjutorium meum intende (Ps. 69:2)
The rubrics do not make clear whether the Choristers also make the Sign of the Cross here.
. . . in pectore vel coram facie sua . . .
The Sign of the Cross in those days was typically a small gesture on the forehead (as a reminder of the mark of the cross received in baptism), or less commonly on the breast; not the familiar form of today that traces a large cross from forehead to breast and from shoulder to shoulder.
Tertullian (d. ca. 250): “In all our travels and movements, in all our coming in and going out, in putting on our shoes, at the bath, at the table, in lighting our candles, in lying down, in sitting down, whatever employment occupies us, we mark our foreheads with the sign of the cross” (De corona, 30).
See Catholic Encyclopedia, ‘Sign of the Cross‘.

7
Magno tonali
The Great Tonary, or the Sarum Tonary.

Ant. Benedictus (Ps. 143:1)
The music indicates that the Psalm-intonation is omitted at the beginning of the Psalm-Tone in this case.  This provides a continuity between the intonation of the  Antiphon and the continuation of the same Verse in the Psalm.  However, in the Psalter [359]. the indication is that the Psalm-intonation is used. It would seem that there is some variation in the practice.

. . . sed in iij. . . . sed raro in iiij.
The meaning seems to be that if the Antiphon begins with the first word of the following Psalm, then it is convenient to omit the Psalm-intonation and join the first phrase of the Psalm directly to the end of the Antiphon-intonation. But if the Antiphon-intonation carries as far as two or (rarely) three words, then it is appropriate to make a separate phrase of the continuation of the Psalm, and thus employ the Psalm-intonation.

. . . Et quod psalmus non incipiatur, antequam illa variatio perficiatur.
The Choir is not to begin singing the Psalm until the leader has completed the Psalm-tone ending, that is, the entire first verse. This is different from most Psalm chanting today, in which the Choir joins the leader after the mediation of the first verse. Presumably in those days the choristers had to wait until they had heard the ending before joining in the Psalm. (Today choristers can see the Psalm-tone ending in their chant books.) In practice, therefore, the first verse of the Psalm will be sung by a leader on one side of the choir; then the Psalm will be taken up by the other side of the choir; and then will be continued by the choir alternating by sides.

. . . reincipiatur antiphona a succentore vel a cantore . . .
This rubric indicates that after the conclusion of the Psalm(s) the Antiphon is intoned by a leader and then continued by the full Choir. This differs from typical contemporary practice in which the Antiphon following the Psalm(s) is sung from its beginning by the full Choir.

8
Ant. Lauda Hierusalem (Ps. 147:1)
The intonation use A rather than the B-flat of the Antiphon, providing a smoother connection to the beginning of the Psalm Tone. This variation is highly unusual.

. . . Rector chori prosequatur hoc modo . . .
This is the beginning of the Psalm-Tone. Seeing that the text of the Antiphon intonation is continued by the opening words of the Psalm, it will be found convenient for the leader to sing the intonation of the Antiphon and the beginning of the Psalm Tone as a single phrase.
After the Ruler has intoned ‘Hierusalem Dominum’ as indicated, the Ruler’s side will continue and complete the first Verse of the Psalm. The other side will sing the next verse, and so on in alternation.

Neuma
The Neuma follows directly, commencing with the beginning of the final syllable of the Antiphon. It is shown separately here in order to indicate its theoretical relation to the Antiphon so that the same principle can be applied in other cases. The eight Neume, one for each mode, are found at 80*.

9
. . . ad altare converso . . .
In the Sarum Rite recitation is typically done facing the Altar (as an offering to the Lord).

. . . non cantando . . .
i.e. not melodically inflected. This is particularly a reminder not to sing the Chapter in the manner of the Epistle Lesson at Mass.

Chapter. Erit in novissimis.
This example does not show the full nature of the Tone for the Chapter, which also has an inflection at the end of each sentence. Sentences ending on weak syllable will inflect to A; sentences ending on strong syllables will inflect A-B (except the last, which will invariably end on F). See 92*.

10
Resp. Ecce dies veniunt (Jer. 23:5; 6b; V. 6a.)
The Verses are based on the standard Mode VIII melody, but the ending is modified to match the melody of the Responsory, ‘in terra’.

11
. . . ad gradum chori.
Soloists singing Responsory Verses at the Quire Step face the Altar.

Hymn. Conditor alme syderum. Anon, 7th. c.
Perf. trans. J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 1851: 10.
Schol. trans. R. A. Knox, The Westminster Hymnal, 1939: 1.

The Sarum sources do not appear to provide any specific directions for performance of the Hymn. We may presume that it was begun by a leader, and continued by that same side of the Choir to the end of the first Verse. Subsequent verses, including the doxology would then be sung alternately. Would the Amen be sung by the side that sings the last Verse, or by the other side, or by both together? Whilst a definitive answer is lacking at present, the editor suggests that both sides sing the Amen together.

The modern Dominican tradition indicates that the first phrase of a Hymn is to be intoned by a leader. See Hymnarium O.P., (2013).

12
V. Rorate celi (Is. 45:8.)
The Roman Use divides the verse after ‘justum’.

The employment of a silent Response is an unfamiliar practice in our day. The silent Response is employed at Matins, Lauds, Vespers, and Compline–whenever the Versicle ends with a melisma. (Palmer, Order of Vespers:12, indicates a sung Response.)

13
Ant. Ecce nomen Domini (Is. 30:27; cf. Sap. 1:7)

The leader will sing the entire first verse of the Magnificat, after which the other side of the Choir will take up the second verse.

V. Dominus vobiscum
This Versicle (and its Response)–wherever it may appear–is properly said only by those in major holy orders (Deacons, Priests, and Bishops). In individual or group lay-recitation it is appropriate to substitute the, ‘V. Domine exaudi orationem meam. R. Et clamor meus ad te veniat.’ followed by ‘V. Oremus.’  (as is done in the Sarum Books of Hours). The V. and R. may be sung simply on the reciting tone of the following Prayer, or may use the inflections of the Preces (as at Lauds, Prime, Vespers and Compline), [188].

In the Performing Edition the text is ‘V. Hear my prayer, O Lord. R. And let my cry come unto thee. V. Let us pray.’

In the Scholarly Edition the text is ‘V. O Lord, hear my prayer. R. And let my cry come unto thee. V. Let us pray.’

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The Manner of Concluding the Prayers
The object of this section is to indicate the proper endings for the prayers that appear throughout the Breviary and Missal. In order to save space, the endings of the prayers are seldom given in full. The choice of ending is dependent upon the Person(s) of God to whom the prayer is addressed. The correct endings are intended to be memorized in accordance with these rubrics.  (It should be noted also that if the full conclusion is used it will always carry on to the final close, ‘Per omnia secula seculorum.’  The Response will be ‘Amen.’)

The following is a complete list of the terminations and their translations.
(a) A prayer addressed to the Father:
Latin: Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition: Through our Lord Jesus Christ thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition: Through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end.
Short form:
 Latin: Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum.
English Scholarly Edition: Through our Lord Jesus Christ thy Son.
English Performing Edition: Through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord.

(b) A prayer addressed to the Father but mentioning Christ near the beginning:
Latin: Per eúndem Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition:
Through the same our Lord Jesus Christ thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition:
Through the same Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end.
Short form:
Latin: Per eúndem Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum.
English Scholarly Edition:Through the same our Lord Jesus Christ thy Son.
English Performing Edition:Through the same Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord. .

(c) A prayer addressed to the Father, that concludes by mentioning the Son:
 Latin: Qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition:Who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition:Who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(d) A prayer addressed to the Son but mentioning the Father:
Latin: Qui tecum vivis et regnas in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum. 
English Scholarly Edition: Who livest and reignest with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition: Who livest and reignest with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(e) A prayer addressed to the Son:
Latin: Qui cum Deo Patre et Spíritu Sancto vivis et regnas in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition: Who livest and reignest with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition: Who livest and reignest with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(f) In a prayer which mentions the Holy Ghost,
Latin: the phrase ‘in unitáte Spíritus Sancti’ is replaced by ‘in unitáte eundem Spíritus Sancti’
 English: the phrase ‘in the unity of the Holy Ghost’ is replaced by ‘in the unity of the same Holy Ghost’.

(g) A Prayer addressed to the Father but mentioning the Trinity:
Latin: In qua vivis et regnas Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
 English Scholarly Edition:  In which livest and reignest God, for ever and ever.
 English Performing Edition:  In which livest and reignest one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(h) A Prayer addressed to the Trinity:
Latin: Qui vivis et regnas Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition: Who livest and reignest God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition: Who livest and reignest one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(i) A Prayer addressed to the Son but mentioning the Holy Ghost:
Latin: Qui cum Patre et eódem Spíritu Sancto vivis et regnas Deus. Per ómnia sécula seculórum.
English Scholarly Edition: Who with the Father and the same Holy Ghost livest and reignest God, for ever and ever.
English Performing Edition: Who with the Father and the Same Holy Ghost livest and reignest one God, world without end.
[No short form.]

(Short endings are used for all but the last of a group of Memorials.)

In the Performing Edition all endings, when possible, are printed in full.

The following are the sources of the incipits given in this section.
Concede nos famulos (Common of Feasts of the blessed Virgin.)
Deus qui miro ordine (St. Michael.)
Deus qui de beate Marie (Memorial of St. Mary in Advent.)
Largiere nobis clementissime (St. Mary Magdalene.)
Omnipotens sempiterne Deus dirige actus (Prime on Sundays.)
Da nobis quesumus Domine imitari que colimus (St. Stephen.)
Fidelium Deus (Vespers, Office of the Dead.)
Deus qui sanctam crucem (Memorial of the Holy Cross.)
Excita quesumus Domine potentiam (First Sunday in Advent.)
Omnipotens sempiterne Deus qui dedisti famulis (Trinity Sunday.)
Proficiat nobis ad salutem (Trinity Sunday, Postcommunion.)
Deus qui corda (Memorial of the Holy Ghost.)

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V. Benedicamus Domino
There will normally be two ‘Benedicamus Domino’, one to conclude the service proper, and another to conclude the Memorials.
There is no indication in the Sarum sources of an audible response ‘Deo gratias’. Compare the Versicle after the Hymn, above, 12.

18
There are besides the short endings which are typically used for the prayers that follow after the first prayer, when a number of Prayers follow in close proximity; that is ‘Per (eundem) Christum Dominum nostrum.’ Memorials use these abbreviated endings.

19
Memorial of Saint Mary
Ant. Ave Maria gratia plena (after Luke 12:26.)

V. Egreditur virga (Isaiah 11:1.)
In the Latin text ‘Jesse’ takes an accent on the final syllable (being a Hebrew word). In the English text ‘Jesse” takes an accent on the first syllable.

21
Vespers of St. Mary
Besides the full (or Great) Office which is sung daily, is a parallel, second (or Little) Office of devotion to the blessed Virgin. This Office is sung ‘recto tono’ (not said) each day, except on days when the Full Service of the Virgin takes place. This Office is not the same as that found in the Books of Hours.
‘ . .  . it is not unlikely that its diffusion is largely due to the marked devotion to the Blessed Virgin which is characteristic of the Church in England under the guidance of St. Dunstan and St. Ethelwold. . . .  In the eleventh century we learn from St. Peter Damian that it was already commonly recited amongst the secular clergy of Italy and France, and it was through his influence that the practice of reciting it in choir, in addition to the Great Office, was introduced into several Italian monasteries. . . . The Austin Canons also retained it, and, perhaps through their influence, in the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, it developed from a private devotion into part of the daily duty of the secular clergy as well. By the fourteenth century the recital of the Little Office had come to be an almost universal practice and was regarded as obligatory on all the clergy.’ ‘Little Office of Our Lady’, Catholic Encyclopedia, newadvent.org.
In the Roman Catholic Church the Little Office as an epilogue to the Divine Office was suppressed in 1910. It continues to be said amongst Carmelites and Carthusians.

. . . sine nota . . .
‘without note’ This is an indication that Vespers (and Matins and Lauds) of St. Mary are to be sung ‘recto tono’, on a single, low pitch (such as F).

. . . in capella que dicitur Salve. . . .
The Salve Chapel is (normally) the Lady Chapel. It is so named from the Mass of our Lady ‘Salve sancta parens’. (Christopher Wordsworth, Ceremonies and Processions of the Cathedral Church of Salisbury (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1901):221.). In Salisbury Cathedral it is now known as the Trinity Chapel, and is located at the extreme east end of the Church. (‘From this day [September 28, 1225] until the Reformation, the principal eastern altar, although dedicated to the Holy Trinity and All the Saints, was used for the daily mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary.’ Tim Tatton-Brown and John Cook, Salisbury Cathedral: The Making of a Medieval Masterpiece (Londons: Scala, 2009):48.)

Ant. Prophete predicaverunt.
This Antiphon appears in the full service as the second Antiphon Lauds of Wednesday (Quattuor temporum) in the third week of Advent.
The selection of Psalms is chosen to avoid duplicating  those of the full service.

22
V. Diffusa est gratia (Ps 44:3.)

Ant. Ne timeas Maria (Luke 1:30.)
This Antiphon is taken from the Antiphon to the Magnificat at Second Vespers of the First Sunday of Advent.

23
The following Memorials are attached to the Daily (said) Office of the Virgin. They are thus said, not sung.

Memorial of the Holy Ghost
In modern Roman Catholic practice this Memorial forms part of the Chaplet of the Holy Spirit and of the Pentecost Novena.

Ant. Veni Sancte Spiritus
The text is the from first part of the Antiphon for First Vespers of Pentecost.
Although it has no CANTUS number, it is not unique to Sarum.

V. Emitte spiritum (Ps 103:30.)
The Vulgate has ‘Emittes’

Prayer. Deus qui corda fidelium
The Prayer is found in the modern Roman Missal as the third Collect at the votive Mass of the blessed Virgin after Pentecost.
Tr. Adrian Fortescue, Roman Missal, 3rd. ed. 1922.

Memorial of the Saint of the Place
This Memorial consists of the Antiphon on Magnificat (or Benedictus at Lauds) from the Feast of the Saint, together with the Versicle following the Hymn (at Vespers or Lauds as appropriate), and the Prayer of the day.
It should be noted, however, that on some saints’ days the Antiphon at Second Vespers is different from those at First Vespers and at Lauds. In this case one could choose between the two Vespers Antiphons, or one could alternate. There seems to be no specific Sarum rubric covering this occurrence.
The Church of Sarum has the peculiarity of being dedicated to the Virgin, which means that a daily Memorial of the Saint of the Place is redundant, seeing that a Memorial of the Virgin will already have occurred on any day in which the Full Service of the Virgin is not offered. Likewise, in locations that are not dedicated, this Memorial would properly be omitted. For this reason the rubics are directed to Benefices and Parish Churches.

Memorial of Relics
If the location of the Office has no relics, it would be appropriate to omit this Memorial.

Ant. Corpora sanctorum (after Eccles. 44:14.)
This text is used for the Alleluya at Mass in the Common of Many Martyrs.

V. Beati qui habitant (Ps 83:5.)

Prayer. Propitiare quesumus
Adapted from the Feast of Relics.

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Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens
Adapted from the Feast of Relics.

Memorial of All Saints
This memorial will be said (recto tono) if it follows the daily (said) Office of the Virgin. It will be sung if it follows the Vespers or Lauds of the Day.

Ant. Ecce Dominus veniet (see Zechariah 14:5-6.)

V. Ecce apparebit Dominus (see Apoc. 14:14; Deut. 33:2; Jude 1:14.)

Memorial of Peace
This Memorial is an indulgenced prayer of Pius IX, 1848.

Ant. Da pacem Domine (after Eccles. 50:25.)

V. Domine fiat pax. (see Ps. 121:7.)

Prayer. Deus a quo sancta desideria
This Prayer originates as the Collect for the Mass for Peace; it is the source for the Evening Collect for Peace in the BCP.

Prayer. Deus auctor pacis et amator
This Prayer originates as the Postcommunion for the Mass for Peace; it is the source for the Morning Collect for Peace in the BCP.

26
At Compline of Advent
V. Converte nos (Ps. 84:5.)

Ant. Miserere (Ps. 4:2.)

27
Ps. 30 is abbreviated here; only the first 6 verses of 26 are included. Evidently the intention is to include ‘In manus tuas . . .’ at Compline. The full Psalm is sung on Mondays at Matins.

. . . nullum psalmum exaltando . . .
This is to indicate that even if the singing pitch has dropped through the course of the Psalms, it should not be interrupted to restore the pitch.

Hymn. Te lucis ante terminum
Anon, 7th century.
Trans. J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 9.
This is the ordinary Hymn throughout the year. The appropriate variable doxologies are not printed in the Breviarium 1531 or the Hymnale Sarum, or in the Antiphonale 1519.

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V. Custodi nos Domine (after Ps 16:8.) Old Roman
This versicle is often divided thus in non–Sarum use:
V. Cutodi nos Domine ut pupillam oculi.
R. Sub umbra alarum tuarum protege nos.

29
The Preces at Compline largely follow the pattern of Prime.

Pater noster.  The leader does not say the beginning ‘Pater noster’ aloud, but all commence the Lord’s Prayer silently.

V. In pace in idipsum (Ps 4:9.)

Credo in Deum. The leader says ‘Credo in Deum’ aloud, and all continue the Apostles’ Creed.

30
V. Benedictus es Domine (cf. Dan 3:56)

The Confiteor and Misereatur form a dialogue between Priest and Choir, following which the Priest pronounces the Absolutionem.  It is normally led by the most senior Priest.

31
V. Deus tu conversus (Ps 84:7-8.)

V. Fiat misericordia (Ps 32:22.)

32
V. Domine Deus virtutem (Ps 70:20.)

V. Domine exaudi orationem (Ps 101:2.)

Prayer. Illumina quesumus Domine
This Prayer is not part of the current Roman Compline.

33
V. Exaudi Domine vocem. (Ps 26:7.)

. . . sine nota . . .
This is thought to mean not ‘without note’ but rather ‘recto tono’, that is on a single pitch (such as F) but without any melodic inflections.

V. Exurge Domine (Ps 43:26.) Old Roman.

V. Domine Deus virtutem (Ps 79:20.)

V. Domine exaudi orationem (Ps 101:2.)

35
For the Peace of the Church
The Devotion ‘For the Peace of the Church’ is separate from Compline proper.  It is repeated at the morning Service. [60].

. . . sine nota . . .
i.e. recto tono.

V. Exurge Domine (Ps. 43:26.)

V. Domine Deus converte nos (Ps. 79:20.)

V. Domine exaudi orationem meam (Ps. 101:2)

Prayer. Ecclesie tue quesumus
Known as the Collect against the persecutors of Holy Mother Church. The final clause does not appear in the Roman form; rather, it appears at the end of the Collect for the Second Sunday after the Epiphany.

36
Compline of Saint Mary.
This Office also appears in the Psalter at [477].
This Office (and also Prime, Terce, Sext, and None of Saint Mary) would be said (i.e. sung recto tono) in convent, by the Officiant of the Lady Mass and the other Vicars who are required to take part, that is as a gathered community, rather than individually, in the Lady Chapel. See p. 73.

Hymn. Virgo singularis
A. J. Collins is incorrect in suggesting that this Hymn was lost; he evidently was unaware that it is an excerpt from the Hymn ‘Ave maris stella’. See ‘Middle-English Devotional Pieces’, The British Museum Quarterly, XVI-4 (Dec., 1940): 87-88. [Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4422230, Accessed: 16-06-2016 18:14 UTC.]

Ant. Ecce ancilla Domini (Luke 1:38.)

Prayer. Gratiam tuam quesumus
This Collect is the Postcommunion for the Feast of the Annunciation. It is the Collect for the Annunciation in the BCP. It also concludes the ‘Angelus’.

38
At Matins of Advent.
V. Domine labia mea. (Ps. 50:17)

V. Deus in adjutorium meum. (Ps. 69:2)

Invit. Ecce venit Rex

‘Officium principalis rectoris . . .’
Seeking the Invitatory chant from the Cantor may seem unneccessary, but perhaps, coming as it does at the beginning of the Office, serves as a reminder of the hierarchy of responsibility for the musical performance of the Office.

39
‘. . . nisi a passione Domini usque ad diem pasche . . . ‘
During that period the ‘Gloria Patri’ is omitted and the repetitions of the Invitatory Antiphon commence with the latter part of the Antiphon.

‘. . . in festis duplicibus . . . ‘
On Double Feasts the Invitatory Antiphon is first sung through by the Rulers of the Choir and is then repeated by the full Choir, after which the Psalm begins. On other days the Invitatory Antiphon is intoned by one or more leaders, and continued by the full Choir, after which (with no repetition) the Psalm begins.

‘Post primum tercium et quintum . . .’
In singing the Invitatory the repetitions of the Antiphon take two forms, Integrum (Whole) and Altera (Latter)–the second half of the Antiphon only, commencing at †. The form of the whole Invitatory is as follows:
Antiphon
(Antiphon repeated on Double Feasts)
Verse 1
Antiphon (Whole)
Verse 2
Antiphon (Latter)
Verse 3
Antiphon (Whole) (re-establishing the pitch if necessary)
Verse 4
Antiphon (Latter)
Verse 5
Antiphon (Whole)
Verse 6
Antiphon (Latter)
Antiphon (Whole)

(The terms Integrum (Whole) and Altera (Latter) do not appear in this context in the Sarum sources; they are adopted from the Nocturnale Romanum (2002, ed. Holger Peter Sandhofe).

Hymn. Verbum supernum prodiens
Anon., c. 10th c.
EP trans. J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 1851, 11.
ES trans. Ronald Knos, The Westminster Hymnal, 1939, 2.
Another translation, by Charles Bigg, is available in The English Hymnal, no. 2. (High Word of God, who once didst come.’
Thomas Aquinas wrote a eucharistic hymn that begins the same way: ‘Verbum supernum prodiens Nec Patris linquens dexteram’.

41
Ant. Non auferetur sceptrum (cf. Gen 49:10.)
The series of nine Antiphons for Advent cycle through the 8 modes; Antiphon 9 uses Mode IV.  The first three Antiphons are based on Genesis.

The Roman Breviaries, both pre- and post-Tridentine, have a different set of Antiphons: ‘Veniet ecce rex’ etc. which also exhibits a cycle of modes, and which likewise appears to be a relatively late addition to the repertoire.

The ‘Non auferetur sceptrum’ series is also found in the York, Hereford, and Rouen Breviaries among others.

. . . nullum psalmum exaltando . . .
This indicates that even if the pitch has fallen during the psalm singing, there should be no interruption to restore the pitch.

Ant. Erit ipse expectacio (Gen. 49:10-11.)
The only non-Sarum source in CANTUS for this chant is Beneventan.

42
Ant. Pulchriores sunt oculi (Gen. 49:12.)

V. Ex Syon species decoris (Ps. 49:2.)

43
V. Jube domine benedicere.
AS:9. unambiguously sets ‘domine’ with three distinct notes. ‘domine’ refers to the priest being addressed. In cases where the office is recited alone, ‘Domine’ would be appropriate, since in this case it is the Lord God that is being addressed. See Catholic Encyclopedia: Gospel in the Liturgy.   In the edition ‘domine’ is translated ‘lord’ in order to distinguish the Sarum tradition from ‘domne’ of the Roman tradition (Breviarium Romanum (1568), 107), which is typically translated as ‘sir’. See also William Maskell, The Ancient Liturgy of the Church of England. 44. (although note that Maskell here uses ‘domne’ without especial warrant).

44
Lectio. Visio Esaie
This example does not show the full detail of the tone for the Lessons, since it so happens that each sentence (except the last) ends on an accented syllable. Sentences ending on weak syllables will inflect to A. See 91*.

V. Hec dicit Dominus (after Isaiah 45:22 or Zacharias 1:3.)

45
V. Tu autem Domine (based on Ps 40:11.)

Resp. Aspiciens a longe (V 1, Ps 48:3; V 2, Ps 79:2; V 3, Ps 79:3.)
This first Matins Responsory is also the most elaborately organized in the entire Antiphonale. Each of the first thee Verses is sung by a different boy; the fourth Verse is sung by all three boys together. Each repetenda is shorter than the previous one. The whole Responsory (up to ‘In populo Israel’) is repeated again at the end.

47
. . . ex parte cantoris . . .
the Cantor’s side. Normally the two sides into which the choir is divided are named ‘Choir’ and ‘other’, the Choir side being the side that takes the lead. As the weeks proceed ‘Choir’ and ‘other’ will alternate from side to side. From this text it appears that on the first week of Advent the ‘Choir’ side will be the south, the Dean’s side (decani), and that the ‘other’ side will therefore be the north (cantoris).

48
Resp. Aspiciebam in visu (Dan 7:13.)

50
Resp. Missus est Gabriel (based on Luke 1:26-33.)
Note the unusual tritone leaf (B-F) at the return of the repetenda.

51
Ant. Bethlehem non est minima (Matthew 2:6; 1:21.)

Ant. Ecce virgo concipiet (Isaiah 7:14.)

52
Ant. Orietur in diebus (Ps. 71:7; 11.)
In CANTUS this text is usually set to Mode III, and is used for the Nativity.

V. Egredietur virga (Isaiah 11:1.)

53
The sermon ‘Igitur quoniam post tempus’ is also available in English translation by Boniface Ramsey, The Sermons of Maximus of Turin (Paulist Press, 1989):46.

Resp. Ave Maria gratia plena (Luke 1:28, 35.)

54
. . . Quando dicitur V. Gloria Patri . . .
This may occur when the Responsory is used after the third Lesson on a feria (during the week).

55
Resp. Suscipe verbum
In the York Use this Responsory appears on the Third Sunday of Advent.
Responsories 6-8 appear as 5-7 in the York Use.

The English Performing version reflects the rhyme of the Verse.
The English Scholarly version is a literal rendering.

56
Resp. Salvatorem expectamus (cf. Titus 2:12.)

57
Ant. Nox precessit (Rom. 13:12.)
‘appropinquabit’ replaces the Vulgate ‘appropinquavit’.

58
Ant. Hora est jam (after Rom. 13:11.)

Ant. Gaudete in Domino (Phil. 4:4.)

59
V. Egredietur Dominus (after Isaiah 25:21.)
The Response is said silently.
Note that this Versicle is not the same as CANTUS 008043, which omits the final words ‘a peccatis eorum’. The inclusion of the final words, albeit sub silentio appears to be a Sarum peculiarity.

60
Resp. Audite verbum (after Jer. 31:10, 4:5.)

61
Resp. Ecce virgo concepit (V Is. 9:6-7.)
The York Use has ‘Obsecro Domine’ here.

62
Resp. Letentur celi (Ps 95:11; Is. 49:13; V Ps 71:7, 11.)

63
. . . Non dicatur Te Deum.
When the Te Deum is sung, the ninth Responsory ends after the Repetenda following the V. Gloria Patri. When Te Deum is not sung, the main part of the Responsory is repeated again from the beginning.

The Ferial Responsories appear on Wednesday because that is the first occasion on which they can occur during the week. They may, however, be deferred to a later weekday, or indeed be omitted entirely on account of an abundance of Feasts and Commemorations.

V. Emitte agnum Domine (Is. 16:1.)
‘Syon’, as a transliteration of the Hebrew, is here accented on the final syllable. In the English versions it is accented on the first syllable.

64
At Lauds.
V. Deus in adjutorium (Ps. 69:2.)

Ant. In illa die (Joel 3:18.)

Ant. Jocundare filia Syon (after Zech. 9:9; see also Sophonias 3:14.)

65
Psalms 62 and 66 are sung as if they were one continuous Psalm.

Ant. Omnes sitientes (Is. 55:1, 6.)

Gloria Patri is omitted at the Benedicite because the Benedicite includes its own unique doxology.

66
Psalms 148-150 are sung as if they were one continuous Psalm.

Hymn. Vox clara ecce intonat
Anon (Ambrosian), 5th-6th c,. cento
Trans. G. H. Palmer, The Diurnal, 157.
(The familiar 1849 translation by Edward Caswall, ‘Hark! an awful voice is sounding’ [rev. Hark! a thrilling voice is sounding’], Lyra Catholica (1849):46, is in a different metre, 87.87.)

67
V. Vox clamantis in deserto (Mat. 3:3.)
The Response is said silently.

68
A Spiritussanctus in te descendet (after Luke 1:35.)

Memorial of Saint Mary
Ant. Missus est Gabriel (after Luke 1:26.)

V. Egredietur virga (Is. 11:1.)

Prayer. Deus qui de beate Marie

This is the Prayer for the Annunciation; it also used for the Memorial of the blessed Virgin at Mass during Advent.

69
. . . sine nota . . .
i. e. recto tono.

. . . statim post vesperas . . .
The meaning ought to be that Vespers of Saint Mary is said directly after Vespers of the day, and Matins (and Lauds) of Saint Mary is said directly after Matins (and Lauds) of the day.

70
In Advent at the Hours of Saint Mary
Invit. Ave Maria (after Luke 1:28.)

Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus (Luke 1:28.)

V. Specie tua (Ps 44:5.)

Ant. Specie tua (Ps 44:5.)

V. Diffusa est gratia (Ps 44:3.)

72
A. Spiritus Sanctus in te (after Luke 1:35, 30.)

73
At Prime of the Blessed Virgin
Hymn. Memento salutis auctor
Anon. The first stanza is the third stanza of the Hymn ‘Christe redemptor omnium’. The second stanza is the third stanza of the Hymn ‘Mater Dei sanctissima’ (AH-12: #73).
Stanza 1 trans. J. M. Neale.
Stanza 2 trans. Fr. Edward Caswall, Lyra Catholica, 1848, 247.

74
Resp. Ave Maria (after Luke 1:28.)

At Terce.
Ant. Missus est Gabriel (after Luke 1:26.)

Resp. Diffusa est gratia (Ps 44:3.)

75
At Sext.
Resp. Specie tua (Ps 44:5.)

V. Adjuvabit eam (Ps 45:6.)  Old Roman

At None.
Ant. Ave Maria (after Luke 1:28.)

76
Resp. Adjuvabit eam (Ps 45:6.)

The Devotion or Suffrage to Mary indicated here in the 1519 Antiphonale is found in its complete form near the end of the Processionale. There appear to be no further rubrics regarding the performance of this Devotion.

Ant. Salve Regina
The form that appears in the Processionale is interspersed with a Hymn, ‘Virgo mater ecclesie’. This also appears in the Books of Hours, but is absent from the Breviaries.

Salve regína misericórdie. Vita dulcédo et spes nostra salve. Ad te clamámus éxules fílii Eve. Ad te suspirámus geméntes et flentes in hac lachryimárum valle. Eya erto advocáta nostra : illos tuas misericórdes óculos ad nos convérte. Et Jesum benedíctum fructum ventris tui nobis post hoc exílium osténde. O clemens. O Pia. O dulcis María.
V. Virgo mater ecclésie etérne porta glórie : est nobis refugium, apud Patrem et Fílium, o clemens.
V. Virgo clemens virgo pia, virgo dulcis o María : exáudi preces ómnium, ad te pie clamántium o pia.
V. Funde preces tuo nato crucifízo vulneráto : et pro nobis flagelláto, spinis puncto felle potáto : o dulcis.
V. Gloriósa Dei mater, cujus natus extat Pater : ora pro nobis ómnibus, quodXX tuam memóriam ágimus : o María.
V. Dele cuplas miserórum, terge sordes peccatórum dona nobis beatórum vitam tuis précibus : o mitis.
V. Ut nos salvat a peccátis, pro amóre sue matris : et ad regnum claritátis non ducat Rex pietátis.
O clemens. O pia. O dulcis. O mitis María salve.

V. Ave María grátia plena Dóminus tecum.
R. Benedícta tu in muliéribus et benedíctus fructus ventris tui.

Orémus.

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus qui gloriose virginis et matris Marie corpus et animam ut dignum Filii tui habitaculum effici mereretur Spiritu Sancto cooperante mirabiliter preparasti : da ut cujus commemoratione letemur ejus pia intercessione ab instantibus malis a subitanea morte et improvisa liberemur. Per eundem Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.
Almighty, everlasting God, who by the cooperation of the Holy Spirit didst prepare the body and soul of the glorious virgin and mother Mary to become a worthy dwelling for thy Son : grant that we who rejoice in her commemoration may by her loving intercession be delivered from present evils and from sudden and unexpected death. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

77
At Prime of Advent.
Hymn. Jam lucis orto sydere
The Hymn possibly dates to the 8th century.  Ambrosian metere (iambic dimeter).  It is sung daily at Prime throughout the year.
The melody for Sundays in Advent is that of ‘Verbum supernum prodiens’ of Matins in Advent and ‘Vox clara ecce intonat’ of Lauds in Advent.
The translation is by J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, 4.
See John Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1892):577.

79
Terce.
Resp. Veni ad liberandum nos (V based on Ps 79:3; )

80
V. Timebunt gentes (Ps 101:16.)

81
Sext.
V. Memento nostri Domine (Ps. 105:4.)

82
None.
Resp. Super te Hierusalem (after Is. 60:2.)

V. Domine Deus virtutum (Ps 79:4-5.)

83
Afer Mass, before the Meal.
This devotion is known familiarly as the ‘Litany of the Faithful Departed’.

. . . sine nota . . .
i.e. ‘recto tono’.

V. Credo videre (Ps 26:13)

Prayer. Absolve quesumus Domine
A somewhat different form of this Prayer appears in the Liber Usualis:1766.

84
At Second Vespers.
Ant. Sede a dextris. (Ps 109:1.)

Ant. Fidelia omnia (Ps 110:7.)

Ant. In mandatis ejus (Ps 111:1.) Gallican

85
Ant. Sit nomen Domini (after Ps 112:2.)

Ant. Nos qui vivimus (Ps 113:26.)

Resp. Tu exurgens (after Ps 101:14.)

86
Ant. Ne timeas Maria (Luke 1:30.)

87
V. Egredietur virga (Is. 11:1.)

89
Rubrics of the Office of the Dead.

90
V. Complaceat tibi Domine (Ps. 39:14.)

91
In quotidianis obsequiis . . . ‘  This indicates that the third Responsory should conclude at the end of the repetendam, omitting a final repetition of the main part of the Responsory.

92
Prayer. Tibi Domine commendamus.
The translation is based upon that found in The Life, Letters, and Sermons of Bishop Herbert de Losinga, ed Edward Merick Goulburn and Henry Symonds. (Oxofrd and London: James Parker and Co,, 1878) Vol. 1:339.

97
Monday in the first week of Advent
V. Ex Syon species (Ps 49:2.)
The ferial Versicles are taken from the Sunday in rotation.

98
Resp. Aspiciebam
The Responsories are taken from the Sunday in rotation, along with the ferial Repsonsories (feria iv). If all weekdays were ferias the series of ferias i, ii, and iii would be repeated on ferias v, vi, and sabbato.

99
Ant. Miserere mei (Ps 50:1.)
This is the ferial Antiphon from the Psalter.

100
V. Vox clamantis (after Is. 40:3 and the four Gospels.)

Ant. Angelus Domini
This text is used as the opening Versicle of the ‘Angelus’.

Preces.
These are the ferial Preces from the Psalter.

104
Memorial of St. Mary
Ant. Spiritussanctus in te (Luke 1:35.)
This Antiphon uses ‘descendet’ rather than the Vulgate ‘superveniet’.

Memorial of All Saints
Ant. Ecce Dominus veniet

106
Chap. Qui venturus est
This Chapter is based the same text as Advent 3, Responsory 3. Only the first phrase is from Hebrews.

108
Ant. Hierusalem respice (after Bar. 4:36.)
This Antiphon appears to be the basis of the longer Palm Sunday Antiphon of the same name (see Noted Missal:488).

109
Tuesday in the first week of Advent
Chap. Prope est ut veniat
Only the first phrase is taken literally from Isaiah.

112
Ant. Querite Dominum (Is. 55:6.)

Wednesday in the first week of Advent
113
Resp. Obsecro Domine (Exod. 4:13; 3:7; Ps 103:3.)

114
Resp. Alieni non transibunt (Joel 3:17-18; Hosea 14:4.)

116
Ant. De Syon exhibit lex (Is. 2:3.)

Ant. Veniet fortior me (Luke 3:16.)
This antiphon has much in common with Mode V. The ambiguity is apparent in the diversity with which flats are applied in the sources. Some continental sources in CANTUS–A-Gu 29:7v. (Benedictine, ca. 1400) and A-KN 1011:6v. (Augustinian, 14th c.) and A-KN 1013:6v.(Augustinian, 12th c.) avoid the problem by avoiding B and B-flat throughout. Others appear to use B-natural throughout. F-Pn lat. 15181:114r. (Notre Dame de Paris, ca. 1300) uses B-flat throughout.

117
Thursday in the first week of Advent

118
Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus (Luke 1:42.)

119
Ant. Expectabo Dominum (Is. 8:17.)

Friday in the first week of Advent

121
Ant. Ex Egypto vocavi (Hosea 11:1.)

Saturday in the first week of Advent

127
Full service of blessed Mary

129
Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus (after Luke 1:28.)

Ant. Sicut mirra electa (after Eccles. 24:20.)

Ant. Speciosa facta es (cf. Song of Songs 2:13, 7:6; Ps 138:11.)

130
Ant. Specie tua (Ps 46:5.)

Ant. Adjuvabit eam (Ps 46:5.)

Ant. Sicut letantium (Ps 86:7.)

131
Ant. Gaude Maria virgo
cf. Purification, Responsory 9.

Ant. Rorate celi desuper (Is. 45:8.)

142
Second Sunday of Advent
Major Privileged Sunday

Note: the Responsory Docebit nos will be sung with ‘Gloria Patri’ (which is not indicated in the Latin and Scholarly editions). Only in Passiontide and in the Office of the Dead is the ‘Gloria Patri’ omitted.

145
Resp. Ecce Dominus veniet
The York Use has ‘Alieni non transibunt’ here, and ‘Ecce Dominus veniet’ appears as the third Responsory.

146
Resp. Civitas Hierusalem
In the York Use ‘Civitas Hierusalem’ is the fourth Responsory.

The sermon ‘Superiore Dominica capitulum evangelicum’ is also available in English translation by Boniface Ramsey, The Sermons of Maximus of Turin (Paulist Press, 2002).

147
Resp. Ecce veniet Dominus
In the York Use ‘Ecce veniet Dominus’ is the fifth Responsory.

149
Resp. Sicut mater consolatur
In the York Use ‘Sicut mater consolatur’ is the sixth Responsory.

150
Resp. Hierusalem plantabis vineam
In the York Use ‘Hierusalem plantabis vineam’ is the seventh Responsory; the Verse is ‘Deus a Libano’. (Matthew Cheung Salisbury, The Secular Liturgical Office in Late Medieval England (Turnhout: Brepols, 2015): 43, indicates the Verse ‘Exulta satis’.)

151
The sermon ‘Dominus ac Redemptor noster’ is also translated in Toal, The Sunday Sermons of the Great Fathers, Vol 1:17.

152
Resp. Egredietur Dominus de Samaria

172
Third Sunday of Advent
Major Privileged Sunday

178
Resp. Egypte noli flere
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Suscipe verbum’.
In the York Use ‘Egypte noli flere’ is the fifth Responsory.

180
Resp. Prope est ut veniat
In the York Use ‘Prope est ut veniat’ is the sixth Responsory.

182
Resp. Descendet Dominus sicut pluvia
In the York Use ‘Descendet Dominus sicut pluvia’ is the seventh Responsory.

The homily ‘Querendum nobis est’ is also translated in Toal, The Sunday Sermons of the Great Fathers, Vol 1:45.

183
Resp. Veni Domine et noli tardare
In the York Use ‘Veni Domine et noli tardare’ is the eighth Responsory.

185
Resp. Ecce radix Jesse
The York Use has ‘Montes Israel’, the ninth Responsory of the fourth Sunday in Advent in the Sarum Use.

199
The homily ‘Exordium nostre redemptionis’, is also found in Bede, Advent Homily 3, CCL 122:14-17.

198
Wednesday in the Ember Days of Advent

The spirula may be a palmer’s staff.  ‘[Palm branches] could not be preserved during so long a journey as that from the Holy Land; [Palmers] appear to have been supplied with staves of palm, of which the make was not always uniform.’ See Thomas Dudley Fosbroke, British Monachism: Or, Manners and Customs of the Monks and Nuns of England 3rd. edition (London: M. A. Nattali, 1843.):316. The object so described would resemble the staff with which the angel Gabriel is so frequently depicted. [DuCange Glossarium: PALMARIUS [Palmatus], Peregrinus. Palmarii porro dicebantur, qui peregrinationem Hierosolymitanam seu ex voto ac pietatis intuitu, vel cruce ac sacra expeditione suscepta, in patriam redierant, quod in signum exactae istius peregrinationis palmarum, quarum ferax est Syria, ramos prae manibus redeundo deferrent.; Petrus Damianus lib. 2. Epist. 15: Ex Hierosolymitana peregrinatione deveniens Palmam ferebat in manu. Sed palma juncta maxime utebantur.]

Although all the available Sarum breviaries agree on ‘spirulam’, ‘spiculam’ would perhaps make more sense.

Although it is possible that this symbol relates to the ancient connection of the ember days with agricultural themes: ‘in June for a bountiful harvest, September for a rich vintage, and in December for the seeding.; hence their feriae sementiva, feriae messis, and feri vindimiales. ‘ Mersham, Francis, ‘Ember Days’, The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. V. Retrieved November 26, 2008 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05399b.htm, the symbolism of the angel Gabriel seems much more likely.

202
Resp. Egredietur Dominus
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Modo veniet Dominus’, the second Responsory of Ember Friday in the Sarum Use.

211
The homily ‘Lectio quam audivimus sancti evangelii’ is also found in the Complete Works of Bede, V:295, Homily XL, and in Bede Homilies (Cistercian Publications, 1991), 1.4.

Resp. Precursor pro nobis
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Egredietur Dominus’, the third Responsory of Ember Wednesday in the Sarum Use.

213
Resp. Modo veniet Dominus
The York Use has ‘Precursor pro nobis’, the first Responsory of this day in Sarum Use.

218
The Homily ‘Redemptoris precursor quo tempore verbum’ is found in PL-76:1160, and is also translated in David Hurst, Forty Gospel Homilies: Gregory the Great (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1990), Homily 6, pp. 35-49.

221
Resp. Radix Jesse qui exurget
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Paratus esto Israel’.

227
Fourth Sunday of Advent
Major Privileged Sunday

231
Resp. Non auferetur sceptrum (cf. Gen. 10, 12.)
This Responsory uses the texts of the first three Antiphons of Sunday Matins in Advent.

232
The sermon ‘Vos inquam convenio o Judei’ appeats in PL-42:1123. This sermon has apparently now been confidently assigned to Quodvultdeus, a younger contemporary and friend of Augustine (John Bloe, ‘Music Notation in the Archivo San Pietro C 105 and in the Farga Breviary, Chigi C. VI. 177’, Early Music History, Vol 18:1 ff.)

235
Resp. Ecce jam veniet
The York Use has ‘Virgo Israel revertere’, the sixth Responsory in the Sarum series.

239
Resp. Virgo Israel revertere
The York Use has ‘Juravi dicit Dominus’, the seventh Responsory in the Sarum series.

240
The homily ‘Ex hujus nobis lectionis verbis’ appears in the Latin Secular Breviary of 1911, and translations appear in the Anglican Breviary, Monastic Matins, The Stanbrook Breviary, and The Roman Breviary (Marquess of Bute). In the Breviarium Romanum 1529 and 1568 it appears on the Third Sunday of Advent.

Resp. Juravi dicit Dominus
The York Use has the Responsory ‘Non discedimus’.

243
Resp. Montes Israel
the York use has the Responsory ‘Nascetur nobis’.

264
Vigil of the Nativity
The title appears before Matins of December 24, and is repeated before Vespers on the same day. From Matins through None there are variable portions depending upon the day of the week; but from Vespers onward the content is invariable.

265
Omelia Origensis. Qui fuit necessitas. Pseudo-Origen.

288
The day of the Nativity
Principal Double Feast

291
Ant. Dominus dixit ad me
The Antiphons of Matins are taken from their associated psalms.

311
Resp. Verbum caro factum est

In the York Use, the ninth Responsory is ‘Descendit de celis’. This is followed by the Prose ‘Facture dominans’, which is then followed by the ‘Liber generationis’.

318
The first Mass of Christmas (Dominus dixit) occurs, according to the title, ‘In gallicantu’, at cockcrow, which would typically be sometime between midnight and dawn. Lauds follows after the mass.

326
After Lauds follows the second Mass of Chrsitmas, Lux fulgebit, the Mass ‘In aurora’, at dawn or daybreak.

333
Procession to the Altar of St. Stephen

Resp. Sancte Dei preciose
This Responsory is in regular metre and rhyme, 8p7pp.
While is was widespread in the later middle ages, it was removed from the Roman books at the Tridentine reform.

334
Prose. Te mundi climata
In CANTUS this chant appears only in the Sarum source GB-AB 20541.

342
The day of St. Stephen
Minor Double Feast

Ant. Beatus Stephanus
The Antiphons at Matins are in modal order; Antiphon 9 is in Mode VIII.
The Ants. carefully combine elements of the Stephen narrative with allusions to the associated psalms.
The Responsories are not in modal order.

In York Use a Prose for St. Stephen appears at (second) Vespers, whereas in Sarum Use a Prose for St. Stephen appears the previous evening.  The York Prose is ‘Conserva super hanc familiam’.

371
Procession to the Altar of St. John
Resp. In medio ecclesie

Prose. Nascitur ex Zebedeo
In CANTUS this chant appears only in the Sarum source GB-AB 20541.

376
The day of St. John
Minor Double Feast

Ant. Johannes apostolus
The Antiphons at Matins are in modal order; Antiphon 9 is in Mode IV.
The Responsories are not in modal order.

402
Procession of the Boys

404
Prose. Sedentem in superne majestatis arce
In CANTUS this chant appears only in the Sarum source GB-AB 20541.
This Prose appears in the York Use, where it is sung after the ninth Responsory of Matins.

412
The day of the Holy Innocents
Minor Double Feast

Ant. Herodes videns
The Antiphons at Matins are in modal order; Antiphon 9 is in Mode IV.
The Responsories are not in modal order.

430
Ant. Laudes reddant pueri
This Antiphon appears in only 2 non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.
The typical Antiphon in this location is ‘Cantabant sancti canticum’, 439.

435
Procession to the Altar of St. Thomas.
Resp. Jacet granum

Another translation, by F. G. Gilliat Smith, appears in The Dublin Review, CXIV (January 1894): 32:
The wheaten grain lies prone before the flail,
The righteous man, hewn down by impious swords,
Thereby exchanging squalid earth for heaven.
The vineyard’s keeper falls beside the vine.
The captain on the battle-field lies low,
The husbandman within his threshing floor.
From squalid earth, Christ’s martyr mounts to heaven.

436
Prose. Clangat pastor
This prose is in rhyme, each line ending ‘ea’, like the Responsory.
In CANTUS this chant appears only in the Sarum source GB-AB 20541.

Another translation, by F. G. Gilliat Smith, appears in The Dublin Review, CXIV (January 1894): 32:
Sound ye the gladsome trump of victory,
For this, that God’s own vineyard might be free,
Which, clad in human flesh, himself had freed
By dying on the purple blood-stained cross.
The savage beast of prey becomes a lamb,
The shepherd’s cruel death converts his foe,
Christ’s marble pavement flows all red with blood.
Thus Thomas wins the martyr’s laurel crown,
And like the wheaten grain, from husk set free,
Is garnered in the storehouse of the King.

438
Ant. Pastor cesus

Another translation, by F. G. Gilliat Smith, appears in The Dublin Review, CXIV (January 1894): 33:
The watchful pastor, slain amid his flock,
Their peace procures, by pouring out his blood.
O joyous sorrow ! O most mournful joy !
The sheep draw breath, the shepherd lyeth low,
And weeping Mother church applauds a son
Who, by his death a victor, mounts to Heaven.

439
Ant. Cantabant sancti
This Mode VIII antiphon has the range associated with Mode VII.

441
St. Thomas the Martyr
Minor Double Feast

For historical background, see:
Analecta Hymnica XIII: 92.
Denis Stevens ‘Music in Honor of St. Thomas of Canterbury’, Musical Quarterly 56 (1970): 311-48.
H. Husmann, ‘Uberlieferung der Thomas-Offizien’, Organicae voces : Festschrift Joseph Smuts van Waesberghe (Amsterdam, 1963), 87-8.
Andrew Hughes, ‘Chants in the Rhymed Office for St. Thomas of Canterbury’, Early Music XVI (1988):185-201.
Andrew Hughes, ‘British Rhymed Offices’, Susan Rankin and David Hiley, eds, Music in the Medieval English Liturgy (Oxford: Clarendon, 1993): 275-8.
Kay Brainerd Slocum, Liturgies in Honour of Thomas Becket (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004).
Andrew Hughes, (ed Helsen and Getz) The Becket Offices: Paradigms for Liturgical Research 2 Vols. (Lions Bay, BC:The Institute of Medieval Music, 2014).

The author of this Office appears to be Benedict, Abbot of Peterborough (d. 1194). This English Office [TH21] ‘was widespread over almost the whole of Europe.’ (Hughes, ‘British Rhymed Offices’:275.) Its original form followed the monastic order of 13 antiphons and 12 responsories at Matins. The secular form found here uses the first 8 Antiphons of the monastic cursus (the ninth, Felix locus, does not appear in the monastic cursus), and uses Responsories 1-3, 6-8, and 10-12 of the monastic cursus.

The chants of this Office are entirely in metre and rhyme: the Responsories and Prose, and the principal (final) Antiphon of each Hour are all in a tetrameter [/ . / . / . . / . .][10pp]. The other Antiphons are in the goliardic metre [7pp6p]. The Invitatory is in a pentameter [/ . / . / . / . / . .][11pp].

Matins
Hymn. Martyr Dei
In the York Use the Hymn is Deus tuorum militum.

The Antiphons at Matins are in modal order, 1-8 + 1. Antiphons 1-8 are biographical; the ninth is a prayer.

Ant. Summo sacerdotio

446
Resp. Jacet Granum
In the York and Herefored Uses the Responsory is ‘Lapis iste’.

448
Resp. Ex summa rerum
In the York and Hereford Uses the Responsory is ‘Post sex annos’.

450
Resp. Mundi florem
In the York and Hereford Uses the Responsory is ‘Ex summa rerum’.

Another translation, by F. G. Gilliat Smith, appears in The Dublin Review, CXIV (January 1894): 35:
The earth’s fair flower by the earth is crushed,
But hush thee Rachel cease thy sad lament,
For when the Martyr sealed his faith in death
A second Abel blossomed in the land.
V. The shattered casket, and his blood poured out
Filled heaven with a mighty voice of prayer
When Holy Thomas, dying, sealed his faith.

451
Resp. Christe Jesu per Thome
In the York and Hereford Uses the Responsory is ‘Jacet granum’.

453
Ant. Felix locus
In the York and Hereford Uses the Antiphon is ‘Hosti pandit ostium’.

454
Resp. Thome cedunt
In the York and Hereford Uses the Responsory is ‘Mundi florem’.

456
Resp. Novis fulget
In the York and Hereford Uses the Responsory is ‘Christe Jesu per Thome’.

457
Resp. Jesu bone per Thome
In the York Use the Responsory is ‘Ferro pressus’.

Another translation, by F. G. Gilliat Smith, appears in The Dublin Review, CXIV (January 1894): 36:
Lord Jesus, by the merits of thy Saint
Forgive us, we beseech thee, all our sins.
O thou who bade the sleeping maid arise,
Who, at the city gate, called back to life
The widow’s son, and from the very grave
Bade Lazarus come forth and live again,
Visit the home, the gateway and the tomb
And raise us from the triple death of sin
V. And in Thy wonted pity purify
Our souls by thought or word or deed defiled.
O raise us from the triple death of sin.
So shall we praise and bless the Triune God,
Raised from the bitter threefold death of sin.

458
Lauds
The Antiphons at Lauds are in modal order, 1-6.

Ant. Granum cadit

463
Ant. Salve Thoma virga justicie
In the Hereford Use the Antiphon is ‘Felix locus felix’.

465
Sixth day in the Nativity of the Lord
At Matins nine psalms.

468
The Memorial of the Nativity at Lauds seems redundant seeing that the sixth day is treated as part of the Octave of Christmas. Nevertheless it appears consistently in the Sarum Breviaries and also in the Missal. A similar indication appears in Breviarium Romanum 1568:213.

January 1: Circumcision
Minor Double Feast

538
January 6: Epiphany.
Principal Double Feast

The image is of the adoration of the magi.

Besides omitting the Invitatory Psalm and the Hymn, the Breviarium Romanum 1529 and 1568 both omit the opening versicles, Domine labia mea.

Ant. Afferte Domino. Ps. 28:1. Old Roman.

539
Ant. Psallite Deo nostro. Ps. 46:7.

Ant. Omnis tera adoret te. Ps. 65:4. (Old Roman ends with ‘altissime’.)

V. Omnes de Saba. Is. 60:6.
This is not the usual versicle melody.

540
The image is of the adoration of the magi.

541
Resp. Illuminare, illumniare. Is. 60:1.

542
Resp. Omnes de Saba. Is. 60:6; Ps. 71:10.

543
Ant. Reges Tharsis. Ps. 71:10.

Ant. Omnes gentes quascunque. Ps. 85:9.

Ant. Venite adoremus eum. Ps. 94:6.

544
V. Reges Tharsis. Ps. 71:10.

Ant. Homo natus est. (cf. Ps. 86:5.)

549
Ant. Fluminus impetus letificat. Ps. 45:5.

Ant. Adorate Dominum. Ps. 95:9, Old Roman.

Ant. Adorate Deum. Ps. 96:7.
The translation uses ‘the Lord’ rather than ‘God’ to accomodate the music more effectively.

The above three antiphons all share the same melodic formula, which is also related to the short responsory melody with alleluya in Mode VI.

V. Omnes gentes quascunque. Ps. 85:9.

550
Resp. Hodie in Jordane. Mat. 3:7.

553
Resp. In columbe specie. cf. Mat. 17:5; Ps. 28:3.

554
V. Dominus vobiscum/Lec. Factum est autem cum baptizaretur.
Although this Lesson, the Genealogy from the Gospel of Luke, is not part of the mass, it appears not only in the printed Breviaries/Antiphonals but also in the printed Missals/Graduals. The fact that it is sung by the Deacon may account for the fact that it is found in the “Altar” books as well as the “Choir” books. The considerable variations in detail amongst the sources may reflect the soloistic nature of this item.
The music of the genealogy has an interesting structure. The melody of the ‘Qui fuit’ section has nine cycles; the first eight cycles are of nine parts, and the last one of three parts. The ‘Qui fuit’ phrases are grouped in threes (indicated by the full bar-lines), each ending on the finalis (as does the first phrase itself). Each succeeding group of three phrases encompasses a higher range than the previous one.

559
V. Omnes de Saba. Is. 60:6.

Ant. Ante luciferum. cf. Ps. 109:3.

560
Ant. Venit lumen tuum. cf. Is. 60:1.

Ant. Apertis thesauris suis. after Mat. 2:11.

562
Hymn. A Patre Unigenitus.
Anon. 10-11th. c.
Trans. J. M. Neale, Ancient Office Hymn Book, #16.
The hymn is an imperfect acrostic running from A through T.
The Breviarium fratrum predicatorum (Basle, 1492): 64v provides the missing letters thus:
for E, ‘Excepit instead of ‘Suscepit’;
[K is understood in the ‘C’ of ‘Clarumque’.];
for S, ‘Sub sceptro tuo inclyto [Tuum defende populum]’.
(The Sarum readings are to be found in other medieval sources.)

J. M. Neale, A Commentary on the Psalms I, Second Edition (London: Joseph Masters, 1869): 122, give the text here as ‘Septrum tu tuum inclytum Tuo defende clypeo’, which restores the acrostic. Neale follows this sense in his translation. See also The Christian Remembrancer XLIV (1863): 155-156.

A. S. Walpole, Early Latin Hymns (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1922): 311 suggests ‘Sceptrum [tu] tuum’ as possible, noting that ‘God’s glorious sceptre had been Israel . . . Now it is the Church.’

The Ecclesiologist XVII (1856): 5 gives ‘Sceptroque tuo inclyto Tuum defende populum’ as another reading.

This Hymn is not in the traditional Roman Office, but does appear in the Liber Hymnarius (1983): 43 less the final verse.

565
V. Vox Domini super aquas. Ps. 28:3.

566
Resp. Omnes de Saba. Is. 60:6.

567
Resp. Reges Tharsis. Ps. 71:10.

568
Resp. Adorate Dominum. Ps. V Domi/p/pp/p/p/pnus vobiscum/Lec. Factum est autem cum baptizaretur. 95:9, Old Roman.

January 7
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 8
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 9
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 10
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 11
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 12
Within the Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

January 7
The Octave, with Rulers of the Choir

639

Septuagesima
Major Privileged Sunday

Sexagesima
Major Privileged Sunday

Quinquagesima
Major Privileged Sunday

835
Wednesday at the beginning of the Fast
Principal Privileged feria
Beginning this day and carrying through to the Octave of Easter (with the exception of Good Friday), there is a separate Mass for each day; resulting from this is an intensification of the content for the Office. Namely, the Prayers that conclude the Offices now change daily; Lauds and the Little Hours use the Prayer (Collect) of the Mass; on weekdays Vespers repeats the Prayer over the People that concludes the Mass of the day. With the use of different Epistles and Gospels at each Mass, the Benedictus and Magnificat correspondingly take new Antiphons each day.

Augustine, Homily 47.  trans. WR.

837
Ant. Cum jejunatis. (Mat. 6:16.)

Memorial for Penitents.
Ant. Convetimini ad me. (Joel 2:12.)

V. Peccavimus cum patribus. (Ps. 105:6.)

838
Prayer. Exaudi quesumus Domine supplicum preces.
In the Roman books this Prayer appears as the second Prayer of the Great Litany.

Ant. Thesaurizate vobis. (Mat. 6:20.)

839
Memorial for Pentitents.
Ant. Quis scit si convertatur. (after Joel 2:14.)

V. Domine non secundum peccata nostra. (after Ps. 012:10.)

840
Thursday after Ash Wednesday.

841
Ant. Domine, puer meus jacet. (after Mat. 8:6.)

Prayer. Deus qui culpa offenderis.
‘propiciatus’ is not found in the Roman version.

842
Ant. Domine non sum dignus. (Mat. 8:8.)

Friday after Ash Wednesday.

843
Ant. Cum facis elemosinam. (Mat. 6:3.)

844
Ant. Tu autem cum oraveris. (Mat. 6:6.)

846
Ant. Quare jejunavimus. (Is. 58:3.)

851
First Sunday in Lent.
Major Privileged Sunday

Hymn. Ex more docti mystico.
Attr. to Pope Gregory the Great (540-604). trans. J. M. Neale, The Hymnal Noted, #75. and The English Hymnal #65.
In The Hymnal Noted the Doxology is as follows:
Grant, O Thou Blessed Trinity,
Grant, O Essential Unity,
That this our fast of forty days
May work our profit and Thy praise!

853
V. Angelis suis. (after Ps. 90:11.)

Ant. Ecce nunc tempus acceptabile. (after II Cor. 6:2-6.)

854
Ant. Signatum est. (Ps. 4:7.)

Resp. In pace in idipsum. (Ps. 4:9; Ps. 131:4.)

855
Hymn. Christe qui lux es et dies.
‘An Ambrosian hymn, quoted by Hincmar, Abp. of Rheims, in his treatise, Contra Godeschalcum. .. De und et non Trinâ Deitate, 857, thus fixing its date at an early period.’ John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) [hymnary.org]
Trans. W. J. Copeland and others, The English Hymnal, 81, except v. 3.

857
V. Custodi nos. (after Ps. 16:8.)

Ant. Cum videris. (Is. 58:7.)

858
Invit. Non sit vobis vanum. (cf Ps. 126:2.)

Hymn. Summi largitor premii.
In A Historical Companion to Hymns Ancient and Modern:57, the Hymn is ascribed to Pope Gregory the Great (540-604). It does not appear in the Breviarium Romanum (1568).
tr. Alan G. McDougall.

860
V. Dicet Domino. (Ps. 90:2.)
KJV and BCP commence with the first person, ‘I’.
Note that the Versicles in each of the Nocturns form a consecutive series from Psalm 90, which Psalm also forms the basis of the propers of the Mass.

Resp. Ecce nunc tempus. (after 2 Cor. 6:2-7.)

862
Resp. In omnibus exhibeamus. (after 2 Cor. 6:2-4.)
In the Breviarium Romanum (1568) the V. ends ‘commendemus nosmetipsos in multi patientia.’

863
Resp. Emendemus in melius. (V. Ps. 105:6.)

864
V. Ipse liberavit me. (Ps. 90:3.)

865
Resp. Paradisi portas. (V. after 2 Cor. 6:2-4.)

866
Resp. Scindite corda vestra (Joel 2:13, Jer. 25:5.)
The Breviarium Romanum (1568) has the Verse ‘Derelinquat impius via suam’.

867
Resp. Abscondita elemosinam. (after Eccl. 29:15, 3:33 [Authorised Version 29:12, 3:30]; V. after Luke 11:41.)

868
V. Scapulis suis. (Ps. 90:4.)

869
Resp. In jejunio et fletu. (cf. Joel 2:12, 17.)

870
Resp. Tribularer si nescirem (cf. Ezech. 33:11; Mat. 15:21-28; Luke 18:10-14.)

871
Resp. Ductus est Jesus. (Mat. 4:1.)

872
Resp. Angelis suis mandavit de te. (Ps. 90:11-13.)
This psalm is also the basis of the Propers at Mass.

873
V. Ipse liberavit me. (Ps. 90:3.)
This Versicle is also used at the Second Nocturn. Considering that the series continues at Lauds, one may entertain the idea that the Versicle before Lauds is a later addition to the (Sarum) liturgy.

Lauds.
Ant. Cor mundum crea in me. (Ps. 50:12.)

Ant. O Domine salvum me fac. (Ps. 117:25.)

Ant. Sic benedicam te. (Ps. 62:5.)

874
Ant. In spiritu humilitais. (after Dan. 3:39.)
In the Authorized Version the text appears in ‘The Song of the Three Holy Children’:16-17.

Ant. Laudate Deum celi celorum. (Ps. 148:4.)

875
Hymn. Audi benigne conditor.
Attributed to Pope Gregory the Great (540-604). (PL 78:849-850.)
Tr. T. A. Lacey, The English Hymnal, #66.

876
V. Scuto circundabit. (Ps. 90:5.)
This Versicle continues the the series from Matins.

Ant. Ductus est Jesus (Mat. 4:1-2.)

877
Ant. Jesus autem cum jejunasset. (after Mat. 4:2.)

Ant. Non is solo pane. (Luke 4:4.)

Resp. Participem me fac Deus (after Ps. 118:62, 132.)

878
Ant. Tunc assumpsit eum diabolus. (Mat. 4:5-6.)

879
Resp. Ab omni via mala. (after Ps. 118:101-102.)

880
Ant. Vade Sathana. (Mat. 4:10, 7.)

Resp. Declara super nos Deus. (cf. Ps. 118:130.)

881
Resp. Esto nobis Domine. (cf. Ps. 60:4.)

882
Ant. Reliquit eum tentator. (Mat. 4:11.)

883
Monday in the First Week of Lent.
The first week in Lent is unusual in that the Lessons of Matins on the weekdays are taken from the Fathers of the Church, rather than from the Old Testament.

884

Lectiones.  ‘Ante dies devotionum.’
Another translation is available in Basil Ramsey, Sermons of St. Maximus of Turin (Newman Press, 1989), Sermon 66.

886
Ant. Venite benedicti Patris mei. (Mat. 25:34.)

887
Ant. Vivo ego dicit Dominus. (after Ezech. 33:11.)

888
Ant. Per arma justicie. (after 2 Cor. 6:4, 7.)

890
Ant. Commendemus nosmetipsos. (after 2 Cor. 6:4-5, 7.)

892
Ant. Quod uni ex minimis. (after Mat. 25:40.)

893
Tuesday in the First Week of Lent.
Lectiones. ‘Penitentes penitentes’.
Sermon 393; PL 39:1713-1715.  Also attributed to Caesarius of Arles, ed. Germain Morin in CCSL 103:272-274.
Another translation by Edmund Hill available in The Works of Saint Augustine, Sermons III-10 (341-400) on various subjects (Hyde Park, New York: New City Press, 1995): 427-429.

895
Ant. Intravit Jesus in templum Dei. (Mat. 21:12.)

896
Ant. Abiit Jesus foras. (after Mat. 21:17.)

Wednesday in the First Week of Lent.
Lectiones. ‘Predicaturus vobis delectissimi’
Another translation is available in Christian Classics Ethereal Library.

899
Ant. Generatio hec prava. (after Mat. 12:39; Luke 11:29.)
This antiphon includes a highly unusual tritone leap at ‘signum non’.

900
Ant. Sicut fuit Jonas. (after Mat. 12:40.)

901
Thursday in the First Week of Lent.
Lectiones. ‘Apostolica dilectissimi doctrina.’
A French translation is available in Oeuvres completes de Saint Augustine, Vol XX. (Paris: Libraire de Luis Vivés, 1873):227, Sermo 148.

904
Ant. Si vos manseritis. (John 8:31-32.)

905
Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui in observatione.
The Breviarium Romanum (1568) has the Prayer ‘Devotionem populi tui.’

Ant. Ego enim ex Deo. (John 8:42.)

906
Friday in the First Week of Lent.
Lectiones. Audistis charissimi sicut evangelica tuba.
The text is found in PL-57:303.

909
Ant. Angelus Domini descendebat de celo. (after John 5:4.)

910
Ant. Qui me sanum fecit. (after John 5:11.)

Saturday in the First Week of Lent.

914
Ant. Assumpsit Jesus discipulos. (after Mat. 17:1-2.)

915
The Second Sunday in Lent.
Major Privileged Sunday

920
Ant. Domine bonum est nos hic esse. (Mat. 17:4.)

921
Invit. Deus magnus Dominus. (Ps. 94:3.)

922
Resp. Tolle arma tua. (after Gen. 27:3-4; 7.)

The first four Responsories share the same Mode and many melodic features.

923
Resp. Ecce odor filii mei. (after Gen. 27:27-28; 29.)

924
Resp. Det tibi Deus. (after Gen. 27:28.)

926
Resp. Dum iret Jacob. (after Gen. 28:10, 13; 18.)

928
Resp. Dum exiret Jacob. (after Gen.28:17; 16.)

929
Resp. Si Dominus Deus meus. (after Gen. 28:20-22; Ps. 93:22; Gen 28:18.)

931
Resp. Erit michi Dominus. (after Gen. 28:21-22; 20.)

933
Resp. Dixit angelus ad Jacob. (after Gen. 32:26, 29; 26:24.)

934
Resp. Minor sum cunctis. (after Gen 32:10-12.)

935
Resp. Oravit Jacob. (after Gen. 32:9, 11; 48:15.)

This Responsory shows a highly unusual transposition of Mode VIII, intended to accommodate the semitone below the finalis (in addition to the whole tone).

936
Resp. Vidi Dominum facie. (after Gen. 32:30; 28.)

937
Ant. Domine labia mea aperies. (Ps. 50:17.)

Ant. Dextera Domini fecit virtutem. (Ps. 117:16.)

Ant. Factus est adjutor meus. (Ps. 62:88.) Old Roman.

938
Ant. Trium puerorum cantemus. (cf. Dan 3:23-25.)

Ant. Statuit ea in eternum. (Ps. 148:6.)

Ant. Egressus Jesus secessit. (after Mat. 15:21.)

939
Ant. Accedentes discipui Jesu. (Mat. 15:23.)
This Antiphon appears in only 6 sources in CANTUS, two of which are of Sarum Use.

940
Ant. Non sum missus. (Mat. 15:24.)
This Antiphon appears in only 13 sources in CANTUS, two of which are of Sarum Use.

Ant. O mulier magna est fides. (after Mat. 15:28.)

941
Ant. Vade mulier semel tibi dixi.
This non-biblical text links the theme of the Gospel (Mat. 15:21-28.) with the text of the Psalm.

Ant. Dixit Dominus mulieri. (Mat. 15:20.)

943
Monday in the Second Week of Lent.

944
Ant. Ego principium qui est. (cf. John 8:25.)

Ant. Qui me misit mecum est. (John 8:29.)

945
Tuesday in the Second Week of Lent.

946
Ant. Unum est enim magister vester. (Mat. 23:9.)

Ant. Quia major est vestrum. (after Mat. 23:11-12.)

947
Wednesday in the Second Week of Lent.

948
Ant. Ecce ascendimus Hierosolymam. (after Mat. 20:18.)

949
Ant. Sedere autem mecum. (after Mat. 20:23.)

Thursday in the Second Week of Lent.

950
Ant. Ego non ab homine. (John 5:34.)

951
Ant. Opera que ego facio. (after John 5:36.)

Friday in the Second Week of Lent.

952
Ant. Malos male perdet. (Mat. 21:41.)

953
Ant. Querentes eum tenere. (Mat. 21:46.)

954
Saturday in the Second Week of Lent.

955
Resp. Pater peccavi. (Luke 15:18-19; 17-18.)

While the other Responsories of this week pertain to the Old Testament Lessons concerning Jacob, this Responsory relates to the Gospel story of the Prodigal Son.

956
Ant. Vadam ad patrem meum. (after Luke 15:18-19.)

961
The Third Sunday in Lent.
Major Privileged Sunday

Resp. Igitur Joseph ductus est. (Gen. 39:1, 2, 21, 23.)
This Responsory appears in only 12 sources in CANTUS, and in CAO is represented only in concordance E. It is unusual amongst Responsories of the Temporale in having an original melody for the Verse.

962
Hymn. Ecce tempus idoneum.
Attributed (in Hymns Ancient and Modern) to St. Gregory.  Trans. T.A. Lacey (The English Hymnal 67), and (final Verse) G.H. Palmer (The Order of Vespers, 160).
In CANTUS this Hymn appears in only 4 sources, two of which are of Sarum Use.

963
Ant. Dedit pater penitenti filio.  (after Luke 15:22.)
In the Roman and monastic Uses the Antiphon is Dixit autem pater.

966
Invit. In manu tua Domine. (after Ps. 94:4)

967
Hymn. Clarum decus jejunii.
St. Gregory.  Trans. Maurice F. Bell (The English Hymnal 68).

969
. . . Joseph cum sedecim . . .
the KJV has ‘seventeen’, not ‘sixteen’.

Resp. Videntes Joseph a longe (after Gen. 37: 18-20, 4.)

970
Resp. Dixit Judas fratribus suis (after Gen 37:25-27; 29-30.)
The Roman Use has a different Verse, Quid enim prodest.

971
Resp. Videns Jacob vestimenta (after Gen. 37:33-34; 35.)
The Roman Use places this Responsory fourth, and has a different Verse, Tulerunt autem fratres.

Verse during the week: Vide si tunica filii tui (after Gen. 37:32-33.)

974
Resp. Joseph dum intraret (after Ps. 89:6-7.)
The Roman Breviary places this Responsory fifth, and has a different Verse, Humiliaverunt in compedibus.

976
Resp. Memento mei du bene tibi fuerit (after Gen 40:1-15; 13.)
The Roman Breviary places this Responsory sixth.

978
Resp. Dixit Ruben fratribus suis (Gen. 42:22; 21.)
The Roman Breviary places this Responsory eighth.

980
Lectiones. Demoniacus iste apud Matheum.
Trans. edited by WR from Lawrence Martin, 2013.

Resp. Merito hec patimur (Gen. 42:21; 22.)
This Responsory reverses the texts of the previous Responsory.

982
Resp. Tollite hunc vobiscum munera (after Gen 43:12-14; 11.)

983
Resp. Loquens Joseph fratribus suis (after Gen 43:23, 45:5; 2-3.)

984
Resp. Iste est frater vester minimus (after Gen. 43:29-30.)

985
Resp. Dixit Joseph undecim fratribus (after Gen. 45:4, 9, 13; 6.)

986
Resp. Nunciaverunt Jacob dicentes (after Gen. 45:26-28.)

987
Ant. Fac benigne in bona voluntate (Ps. 50:20.)

988
Ant. Dominus michi adjutor est (Ps. 117:6, Old Roman.)

Ant. Deus misereatur nostri (Ps. 66:2.)

Ant. Vim virtutis sue

989
Ant. Sol et luna laudate Deum (Ps. 148:3, 13.)

Hymn. Jesu quadragenarie.
Anon. ca. 9th c. Trans. T. A. Lacey (The English Hymnal, 69.)

991
Ant. Jesus cum ejicisset demonium (Luke 11:14.)
This Antiphon appears in this form in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, PL-KIk 1. Other sources have ‘Et cum ejecisset Jesus’ or ‘Et cum ejecisset demonium’ [002695].

Ant. Si in digito Dei (Luke 11:20).

992
Ant. Dum fortis armatus custodit atrium suum (Luke 11:21.)

Resp. Bonum michi Domine (Ps. 118:71-13, Old Roman.)

993
Ant. Qui non colligit (Luke 11:23.)

994
Ant. Cum immundus spiritus (Luke 11:24.)

995
Resp. Septies in die. (Ps. 118:164, 176. Old Roman.)

996
Resp. Educ du carcere. (Ps. 141:8; 5. Old Roman.)

997
Ant. Extollens quedam mulier (After Luke 11:27-28.)

998
Monday in the Third Week of Lent.

999
Ant. Amen dico vobis quia nemo (Luke 4:24.)

1000
Ant. Jesus autem transiens (Luke 4:30.)

1001
Tuesday in the Third Week of Lent.

1002
Ant. Si duo ex vobis. (Mat. 18:19.)

1003
Ant. Ubi duo vel tres congregati fuerint (after Mat. 18:20)
While this text is universal in the liturgy, it in fact differs from the Vulgate: ‘Ubi enim sunt duo vel tres congregáti in nómine meo’.

Wednesday in the Third Week of Lent.

1005
Ant. Audite et intelligite (after Mat. 15:10, Mark 7:14, 2 Thess. 2:15.)

Ant. Non lotis manibus (Mat. 15:20.)

1006
Thursday in the Third Week of Lent.

1007
Ant. Operamini non cibum (John 6:27.)

Ant. Panis enim Dei est (John 6:33.)

1008
Friday in the Third Week of Lent.

1009
Ant. Domnine ut video (John 4:19-20.)

1010
Ant. Veri adoratores adorabunt (John 4:23.)

Saturday in the Third Week of Lent.

1011
Ant. Inclinavit se Jesus (after John 8:6-7.)

1016
The Fourth Sunday in Lent.
Major Privileged Sunday

Ant. Nemo te condemnavit (after John 8:10-11.)

1017
Invit. Populus Domini (Ps. 94:7, 6 (Old Roman).)

1018
Resp. Locutus est Dominus (Exod. 4:19; 6:11; 7:2, 13, 22; Acts 7:34.)

1019
Resp. Stetit Moyses coram Pharaone (after Exod. 5:1; 9:13.)

1020
Rep. In mare via tua (Ps. 76:20, 21; Sap. 10:18.)

1021
Medie lectiones. Stabat Moyses in monte
Attr. John Chrysostom in Divi Joannis Chrysostomi Ardhiepiscopi Constantinopolitani Opera Omnia (Amsterdam, 1687), I:221. attr. St. Peter Chrysologus in Franciscus Liverani, Spicilegium Liberianum (Florence, 1863), I:190.
Trans. WR.

1022
Resp. Qui persequebantur populum tuum (Neh. 9:12)

1024
Resp. Cantemus Domino (after Exod. 15:1-2, 4; Eccl. 51:2.)

1025
Resp. Moyses famulus Domini (after Exod. 34:28; 34:4.)
The Roman form has a longer Verse.

1026
Homily. Qui signa et miracula.
Trans. WR Another translation can be found in Lawrence T. Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable : Homilies on the Gospels, 2.2.

1027
Resp. Splendida facta est facies Moysi (cf. Exod. 34:29-30.)
The Roman version has a different Verse.

1028
Resp. Ecce mitto angelum meum (after Exod. 23:20, 21-23; Bar. 1:20; Ps. 80:9-11 (Old Roman).)

1029
Resp. Audi Israel precepta Domini (after Deut. 4:1; Exod. 23:21, 22.)
Note that the Verse is part of the previous Responsory.

1030
Resp. Attendite popule meus (Ps. 77:1-2 (Old Roman).)

1031
Ant. Tunc acceptabis sacrificium (after Ps. 10:21, 11.)

Ant. Bonum est sperare in Domino (Ps. 117:9.)

Ant. Benedicat nos Deus Deus noster (after Ps. 66:7-8.)

1032
Ant. Potens es Domine (after Dan. 3:88 (Song of the Three Children:66).)

Ant. Reges terre et omnes (after Ps. 148:11.)

Ant. Abiit Jesus trans mare (after John 6:1-4.)

1033
Ant. Subiit ero Jesus in montem (John 6:3, 4.) compare above.

Ant. Accepit ergo Jesus panes (John 6:11.)

1034
Ant. De quinque panibus (after John 6:9, 10 (cf. Mat. 16:9).)

1035
Ant. Satiavit Dominus (John 6:10 (cf. Mat. 14:19, Mark 6:41, Luke 9:16).) cf. above.

Resp. Adduxit eos Dominus (after Deut. 32:12-13; Exod. 32:11; Ps. 80:17.)

1037
Ant. Illi homines cum signa (after John 6:14; 4:42.)

1038
Monday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1039
Ant. Auferte ista hinc (John 2:16.)

1040
Ant. Solvite templum hoc (John 2:19.)

Tuesday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1041
Ant. Quid me queritis (after john 8:40.)

1042
Ant. Unum opus feci (John 7:21.)

Wednesday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1043
Ant. Rabbi, quis peccavit hic (John 9:2.)

1044
Ant. Ille homo qui dicitur Jesus (after John 9:11.)

1045
Thursday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1046
Ant. Pater diligit Filium (John 5:20.)

Ant. Sicut Pater suscitat mortuos (John 5:21.)

1047
Friday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1048
Ant. Lazarus amicus noster dormit (John 11:11.)

Ant. Domine si hic fuisses (John 11:21, 32, 29.)

1049
Saturday in the Fourth Week of Lent.

1050
Ant. Ego sum lux mundi (John 8:12.)

The Sunday of the Passion.
Principal Privileged Sunday

Resp. Circundederunt me. (Ps. 21:13, 12 (Old Roman).)

1056
Hymn. Vexilla regis prodeunt
Text, Venantius Fortunatus.
The Hymn ‘was composed by Fortunatus on the occasion of the reception of a relic of the True Cross, which was sent by the Emperor Justin II to St. Radegunde.’ Matthew Britt, The Hymns of the Breviary and Missal (London: Burns, Oates & Washbourne, 1925):124. (‘. . . on the occasion of the reception of certain relics by S. Gregory of Tours and S. Radegund previously to the consecration of a church at Poictiers.’ J. M. Neale, Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (London: Joseph Masters, 1851):6.)
Originally a processional Hymn, stanzas 7 and 8 were added ‘when the Hymn was appropriated to Passiontide.’ (Ibid.:8.)
AH-7:#91. (p. 105.)
The second stanza does not appear in the Roman, Dominican, or Rouen traditions; it does appear in the York Breviary.
Trans. (performing edition) J. M. Neale, Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences: 6-7.
Trans. (scholarly edition) W. K. Blount (1670) in Britt, The Hymns of the Breviary and Missal:123-124.  Stanzas 2 and 7 of the scholarly edition trans. The Psalter of Sarum, 1852. (Stanza 8 of the scholarly edition trans. J. M. Neale.)

1058
V. Dederunt in escam (Ps. 68:22.)

Ant. Ego sum qui testimonium (John 8:18.)

1063
Invit. Hodie si vocem (after Ps. 94:8.)

1065
Hymn. Pange lingua gloriosi
Text, Venantius Fortunatus.
The Hymn Pange lingua gloriosi and the Hymn that follows at Lauds, Lustra sex, were composed by Fortunatus as a single Hymn.
Trans. (performing edition) Percy Dearmer, The English Hymnal: #95; final verse, Monastic Diurnal: 272.
Trans. (scholarly edition) R. A. Knox, The Westminster Hymnal: #35. (Stanza 5. trans. Monastic Diurnal: 272.) The doxology given by Knox is:
Honour, glory, might and merit
To the eternal Trinity,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Throned in heaven co=equally :
All that doth the world inherit,
Praise one God in Persons three.
An excellent translation by J. M. Neale is also to be found, in Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (London: Joseph Masters, 1851): 1-5.)
The Roman and Dominican forms contain an additional stanza, Vagit infans inter arcta. This does not appear in the York or Rouen Breviaries.

1066
Ant. Vulpes foveas habent (Mat. 8:20; Luke 9:56.)

V. Erue a framea (Ps. 21:21.)

1067
Resp. isti sunt dies (Exod. 12:18, 12.)

1068
Resp. Multiplicati sunt qui tribulant me (after Ps. 2:2-3, 7, Ps. 12:5 (Old Roman).)

1069
Resp. Qui custodiebant animam ((Ps. 70:10-11; after Ps. 40:8-9.)

1071
Ant. Sicut exaltata est (after John 3:14.)

V. De ore leonis (Ps. 21:22 (Old Roman).)

Sermon of Blessed John the Bishop
Trans. WR.

1072
Resp. Deus meus es tu (after Ps.21:11-12; 2 (Old Roman).)

1073
Tota die contristatus (Ps. 37:7-8, 13; Ps. 37:13 (Old Roman).)
The Roman Breviary has a different Verse.

1075
Resp. Deus meus eripe me (Ps. 70:4-5.)
The Roman Breviary has a different Verse.

1076
Ant. Recordare mei Domine (after Jer. 15:15.)

V. Ne perdas cum impiis. (Ps. 25:9.)

1077
Lectiones. Pensate fratres charissimi mansuetudinem Dei.
Another translation is available in Forty Gospel Homilies, #16.

Resp. Adjutor et susceptor meus (Ps. 118:114, 115, 113 (Old Roman).)

1078
Resp. In te jactatus sum (Ps. 21:11 (Old Roman); Ps. 21:22 (Gallican).)

1080
Resp. In proximo est tribulatio (Ps. 21:12, 17, 22-23, 21 (Old Roman).)

1081
Resp. Ne perdas cum impiis (Ps. 25:9, 11; :s. 139:2.)

Resp. Ne avertas faciem (Ps. 58:18, 19.)

1082
V. Intende anime mee (Ps. 68:19.)

Ant. Vide Domine afflictionem (Lam 1:9.)

Ant. In tribulatione invocavi (Ps.117:5 (Old Roman).)

1083
Ant. Judicasti Domine causam (after Lam 3:38.)
This Antiphon is also used during the week at Terce.

Ant. Popule meus quid feci (Micah 6:3.)
This Antiphon is also used during the week at Sext.

Ant. Nunquid redditur pro bona (Jer. 18:20.)
This Antiphon is also used during the week at None.

1084
Hymn. Lustra sex qui jam peracta
Text, Venantius Fortunatus.
This is a continuation of the Hymn Pange lingua gloriosi (Matins above)
Trans. J. M. Neale (Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (London: Joseph Masters, 1851): 3-4.); stanza six, Monastic Diurnal: 272.
The translation by R. A. Knox, appears in The Westminster Hymnal: #36.

1086
V. Eripe me de inimicis (Ps. 58:2.)

Ant. Quis ex vobis (John 8:46-47.)

1087
Ant. Ego demonium non habeo (John 8:49.)

V. Exurge Domine adjuva nos (Ps. 43:26 (Old Roman).)

Ant. Ego gloriam meam (after John 8:50.)

1088
Resp. Erue a framea (Ps. 21:21.)

V. De ore leonis. (Ps. 21:22.)

1089
Ant. Amen amen dico vobis (John 8:51, 52.)

Resp. De ore leonis Ps. 21:22, 21.)

1090
V. Ne perdas cum impiis (Ps. 25:9.)

Ant. Abraham pater vester (John 8:56.)

1091
Resp. Principes persecuti sunt (Ps. 118:161-162 (Old Roman).)

V. Eripe me Domine (Ps. 139:2.)

1092
Resp. Usquequo exaltabitur (Ps. 12:4, 5-6 (Gallican).)

1093
Ant. Amen amen dico vobis (after John 8:58.)

1094
Monday in the Passion of the Lord
Invit. Adoremus Dominum

1096
V. Eripe me de inimicis (Ps. 58:2.)

Ant. In die magno festivitatis (John 7:37.)

1097
Ant. Anime impiorum

Ant. Judicasti Domine causam (Lam. 3:58.)
This Antiphon is repeated from Lauds on Sunday.

1098
Ant. Popule meus (Micah 6:3.)
This Antiphon is repeated from Lauds on Sunday.

Ant. Nunquid redditur pro bono (Jer. 18:20.)
This Antiphon is repeated from Lauds on Sunday.

1099
Ant. Si quis sitit (after John 7:37-38.)

1100
Tuesday in the Passion of the Lord

1101
Ant. Tempus meum nondum advenit (John 7:6.)

Ant. Vos ascendite ad diem festum (after John 7:8.)

1102
Wednesday in the Passion of the Lord

1103
Ant. Oves mee vocem meam (John 10:27.)

Ant. Multa bona opera operatus sum (John 10:32.)

1104
Thursday in the Passion of the Lord

1105
Ant. Quid molestis estis (Mat 26:10 (Mark 14:6).)

Ant. Mittens hoc mulier in corpus meum (after Mat 26:12.)

1106
Friday in the Passion of the Lord

1107
Ant. Appropinquabat autem dies festus (Luke 22:1-2.)

1108
Ant. Principes sacerdotum consilium fecerunt (Mat. 26:3-4.)

1110
Saturday in the Passion of the Lord
Ant. Desiderio desideravi (Luke 22:15.)

1114
Palm Sunday
Principal Privileged Sunday

1119
Lessons from a Sermon of Blessed Maximus.
Trans. WR. Another translation appears in Boniface Ramsey O.P., trans. The Sermons of St. Maximus of Turin (New York, Newman Press, 1989):69-72. (Sermon 29).

. . . In finem pro susceptione matutina : psalmus ipsi David . . . [Ps. 21:1.]
. . . solem hec justicie . . .[cf. ‘solem justicie’ opening text of Responsory 9 for the Feasts of the Nativity and the conception of Blessed Mary.]

1120
. . . In matutino interficiebam omnes peccatores terre. . . . [Ps. 100:8.]

1121
. . . Deus Deus meus respice in me . . . [Ps. 21:2.]
. . . cur me dereliquisti ? . . . [Ps. 21:2.]
. . . nec erat dolus in ore ejus. . . . [Is. 53:9.]
. . . Hely Hely . . . dereliquisti ? . . . [after Mat. 27:46; Ps. 21:2.]
. . . Ego autem sum vermis et non homo. . . . [Ps. 21:7.]
. . . pulicem . . . [cf. I Ref. 24:15; 26:20.]

1123
. . . Nisi quis . . . semetipso. . . . [after John 6:54.]
. . . Qui manducat . . . manducat et bibit. . . . [I Cor. 11:29.]
. . . Neque enim Pater . . . dedit Filio. [John 5:22.]
. . . diviserunt sibi . . . miserunt sortem . . . [Ps. 21:9.]
. . . Quomod hic . . . didicerit ? . . . [John 7:15.]
. . . mea doctrina . . . qui misit me. . . . [John 7:16.]
. . . Astitit regina . . . vestitu deaurato. . . . [Ps. 44:10.]

1125
Homily of the Venerable Bede
Trans. WR. Another translation is available in Lawrence Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable : Homilies on the Gospels, Book Two (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1991), #3.

Monday in Holy Week

Tuesday in Holy Week

Wednesday in Holy Week

1162
Thursday in Holy Week

The Sarum Offices of Matins and Lauds for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, appear complete in English translation with music in G. H. Palmer, The Order of Tenebrae (Wantage: S. Mary’s Convent, 1956).

1164
Lesson 1.
The Solesmes Edition (LU:631) sets the title of the Lesson to music: ‘Incipit Lamentatio Jeremie Prophete’. It would appear that in the Sarum tradition the title is not sung nor said.
The Tone of the Lamentation is a variant of the Psalm-Tone of Mode I. The Hebrew letters are set to the Tone-ending as a melisma. The Tone itself uses the intonation on every verse, and also after the mediation–unless the brevity of the line prohibits it. The mediation, of two accents, is more elaborate than the normal Sarum mediation for Tone I; it differs from the Solesmes version in including a preparatory note, G. An additional syllables after the first accent will be on A; an additional syllable after the second accent will be on G. The ending is of one accent with two preparatory notes, G.F. An additional syllable after the accent will be on F.
(The Solesmes form provides two endings, one for intermediary sentence endings, and one for the final ending of each ‘Letter-paragraph’.)

1165
Hierusalem, Hierusalem
This Verse is the Lector’s conclusion to the reading; it is not sung as a choral response in the Sarum (or Roman) tradition. Note that in this case the mediation omits it’s preparatory note, and that the final syllable of the verse has in effect a ‘neuma’.

Matins on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of this week contain nine Responsories each day. The Sarum and Hereford Uses contain the same 27 Responsories, but with different orders; the York Use omits from this series ‘Judas mercator’ and adds ‘Eram quasi agnus’. the following table shows the varying order of responsories on these three days in the Uses of Sarum, York, and Hereford. For convenience, the Sarum Use is given as the standard, and its Responsories listed in order T1 through T9 (Thursday), and so on for Friday and Saturday. The locations where sources are in agreement are given in bold. Where Responsory Verses differ, they are indicated.
sarum triduum responsories table

1170
Lessons from an Exposition by St. Augustine
Trans. WR. Another translation appears in Philip Schaff, ed. Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, Series 1, Volume 8 (Grand Rapids: Christian Classics Ethereal Library, 1888): 531-532. Another translation appears in G. H. Palmer, The Order of Tenebrae (Wantage: S. Mary’s Convent, 1956):23-25.
. . . Exaudi Deus orationem . . . animam meam. . . . [Ps. 63:2 (Old Roman).]

1171
. . . A timore inimici . . . animam meam. . . . [Ps. 63:2.]

1172
. . . Protexisti me . . . operantium inquitatem. . . . [Ps. 63:3.]
. . . potestate ponere animam suam, et iterum recipere eam . . . [cf. john 10:18.]

1179
Ant. Traditor autem dedit eis
All three Antiphon on the Benedictus during the Triduum share a similar melodic profile.

1194
Lessons from an Exposition by St. Augustine
A continuation from the previous day.
Trans. WR. Another translation appears in Philip Schaff, ed. Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, Series 1, Volume 8 (Grand Rapids: Christian Classics Ethereal Library, 1888): 532-533. Another translation appears in G. H. Palmer, The Order of Tenebrae (Wantage: S. Mary’s Convent, 1956):61-64.
. . . Exacuerunt tanquam . . . rem amarum. . . . [Ps. 63:4.]
. . . Nobis non licet interficere quemquam. . . . [John 18:31.]

1195
. . . crucifige crucifice . . . [Luke 23:21; John 19:6.]
. . . hora sexta sicitur Pylatus sedeisse pro tribunali . . . [cf. John 19:14.]
. . . hora tertia qrucifixum . . . [cf. Mark 15:25.]

1203
Ant. Posuerunt super caput ejus
All three Antiphon on the Benedictus during the Triduum share a similar melodic profile.

Holy Saturday

1212
Lessons from a Sermon of blessed Paul
This sermon is attributed to Augustine, and is in some places listed as Sermon 223/1.
Trans. WR. Another translation appears in G. H. Palmer, The Order of Tenebrae (Wantage: S. Mary’s Convent, 1956):96-98.
. . . Illumina oculos meos . . . adversus eum. . . . [Ps. 12:4-5.]

1216
A Homily of the Venerable Bede
trans. WR. Another translation appears in G. H. Palmer, The Order of Tenebrae (Wantage: S. Mary’s Convent, 1956):102-104.

1216
. . . mortuus est . . . justificationem nostram. . . . [after Rom. 4:25.]

1217
. . . que lucescit in prima sabbati . . . [Mat. 28:1.]

1218
. . . Et valde mane . . . orto jam sole. . . . [Mark 16:2.]

1221
Ant. Mulieres sedentes ad monumentum
All three Antiphon on the Benedictus during the Triduum share a similar melodic profile.

At Vespers
Seeing that the Easter Vigil takes place after None, the end of the Vigil Mass is united with an abbreviated Vespers, and the two end together. The Vigil then concludes with Compline. This pattern is retained in the Breviarium Romanum 1568.

In the 1951-56 Roman reform of Holy Week the Easter Vigil begins later, some time after Vespers (Compline is not said). (This Vespers is thus not part of the Medieval Office.) The end of the Vigil Mass is united with an abbreviated Lauds, and the two end together. There is thus no Matins on Easter Day, the several Readings and Canticles (Tracts) of the Vigil standing in for of those of Matins.

1228

Easter Sunday
Principal Double Feast

Elevatio

The elevatio at Sarum took place very early in the morning, before Matins.  According to Young, the elevatio at Durham Cathedral was ‘betweene 3 and 4 of the clocke in the morninge’. (Karl Young, The Drama of the Medieval Church I:138. (J.T. Fowler, ed., Rites of Durham, Durham: Surtees Society,  Vol. 107:12-13.))

1232
Psalms in Easter-tide
During Easter-tide the Psalmody at Matins and Prime is reduced in quantity by redistribution, so that, in principle the Matins Psalmody is cycled once in the season rather than once in a week. Generally speaking the normal Sunday Psalms (1-20) and those omitted from Prime in Easter-tide (22, 23, 25) are redistributed (in order) through Matins of Easter Week. The following Sundays all take the same Psalms as Easter Sunday (1-3). However the week-days begin to cycle through their respective Psalms so that only three of the twelve Psalms normally sung on a ferial Matins are sung on a feria in Easter-tide. Saturdays begin to take up the Commemoration of Mary. As we move into the final days before the Ascension, Monday and Wednesday begin to repeat their cycles from before, but Tuesday takes the Office of the Blessed Virgin. The relevant rubrics appear at first on each day, but beginning on Monday after the Second Sunday after Easter the rubrics are grouped together, p. 1385. The rubric concerning the Commemoration of Saint Mary on Tuesday before the Ascension appears on p. 1444, just before the beginning of Feria iij.
The Dominican Breviary 1492 (with minor differences), follows the same pattern.

(It will be noted that the plan in the Breviarium Romanum 1529 and 1568 is different: during Easter-week Psalms 1-3 are sung each day at Matins. Then the Psalmody reverts to the pattern found outside Easter-tide.

1233
Homily of Blessed Gregory
Tr. WR. Another translation by David Hurst is available in Gregory the Great: Forty Gospel Homilies (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1990):#21. Another translation by M. F. Toal is available in The Sunday Sermons of the Great Fathers II (Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1958):242. Another translation is available in Monastic Breviary Matins (Tymawr, Lydart, Monmouth: Society of he Sacred Cross, 1961):408.
. . . Leva ejus . . . amplexabitur me. . . . [Cant 2:6.]

1235
. . . Erat autem aspectus . . . sicut nix. . . . [Mat. 28:3.]
. . . columna ignis . . . preibat in die. . . . [cf. Exod. 13:21-22.]
. . . Fuistis aliquando . . . in Domino. . . . [Eph. 5:8.]

1236
. . . Jesum queritis Nazarenum. . . . [Mark 16:6.]
. . . Sed ite dicite . . . in Galileam. . . . [Mark 16:7.]

1237
. . . precedet vos . . . sicut dixit vobis. . . . [Mark 16:7.]

1260
Monday in Easter Week
Minor Double Feast

1261
Homily of Blessed Gregory
Another translation by David Hurst is available in Gregory the Great: Forty Gospel Homilies (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1990):#23. See also PL-174:807. Another translation is available in Monastic Breviary Matins (Tymawr, Lydart, Monmouth: Society of he Sacred Cross, 1961):412.

. . . duobus discipulis ambulantis in via . . . [Luke 9:57.]

1262
. . . et coegerunt eum . . . [Luke 24:29.]

1263
. . . No auditores . . . justificabuntur. . . . [Rom 2:13.]

1264
. . . Charitas fraternitatis . . . hospitio receptis. . . . [Heb. 13:1-2.]
. . . Hospitales invicem : sine mutmuratione. . . . [I Pet. 4:9.]
. . . Hinc ipsa Veritas . . . et suscepistis me. . . . [cf. Mat. 25:35.] (In Roman mythology Truth is a goddess, hence feminine.)

1273
Tuesday in Easter Week
Minor Double Feast

Homily of the Venerable Bede
Trans. WR. Another translation can be found in Lawrence T. Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable : Homilies on the Gospels, 2.9.
. . . Ubi sunt duo . . . in medio eorum. . . . [Mat. 18:20.]

1274
. . . Pacem relinquo . . . do vobis. . . . [John 14:27.]
. . . Gloria in excelsis . . . bone voluntatis. . . . [Luke 2:14.]

1274
. . . Unde recte et . . . princeps pacis nominatur. . . . [Is. 9:6.]
. . . Et veniens evangelizavi . . . Spiritu ad Patrem. . . . [Eph. 2:17.]

1276
. . . Quid inquiens turbati . . . quia ego ipse sum. . . . [Luke 24:38-39.]

1281
Wednesday in Easter Week
Minor Double Feast

Homily of Blessed Peter.
Tr. WR. Another translation by David Hurst is available in Gregory the Great: Forty Gospel Homilies (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1990):#24. Another translation is available in Monastic Breviary Matins (Tymawr, Lydart, Monmouth: Society of he Sacred Cross, 1961):418.
. . . Nemo mittens manum . . . regno Dei . . . [Luke 9:62.]

1282
. . . Hec sunt verba . . . essem vobiscum. . . . [Luke 24:44.]

1284
. . . Mittite in dexteram . . . et invenietis. . . . [John 21:6.]

1289
Thursday in Easter Week

Homily of Blessed Gregory
Tr. WR. Another translation by David Hurst is available in Gregory the Great: Forty Gospel Homilies (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1990):#25. Another translation is available in Monastic Breviary Matins (Tymawr, Lydart, Monmouth: Society of he Sacred Cross, 1961):420.
. . . Maria Magdalene . . . peccatrix . . . [after Luke 7:37.]
. . . Dimissa sunt ei . . . dilexit multum. . . . [after Luke 7:47.]
. . . Abierunt ergo discipuli . . . ad semetiplsos. . . . [after John 20:10.]
. . . Maria autem stabat . . . foris plorans. . . . [after John 20:11.]

1290
. . . Qui aute perseeraverit . . . hic salvus erit. . . . [Mat 10:22; 24:13.]

1291
. . . maria cum fleret . . . in monumentum. . . . [John 20:11.]
. . . Vidit duos angelos . . . fuerat corpus Jesu. . . . [John 20:12.]
. . . In principio erat Verbum . . . et Deus erat Verbum. . . . [John 1:1.]

1292
. . . Verbu caro . . . habitavit in nobis. . . . [John 1:14.]

1296
Friday in Easter Week

Homily of the Venerable Bede
Trans. WR. Another translation can be found in Lawrence T. Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable : Homilies on the Gospels, 2.8.
. . . discipuli abierunt . . . et videntes eum adoraverunt. . . . [Mat. 28:16-17.]

1297
. . . Ite dicite discipulis . . . ibi eum videbitis. . . . [[Mat. 28:7.]
. . . Et . . . abierunt discipuli . . . et videntes eum adoraverunt. [Mat. 28:16-17.]

1298
. . . Christus resurrexit . . . primitie dormientium . . . [I Cor. 15:20.]
. . . gloriam Dei . . . imaginem transformamur . . . [2 Cor. 2:18.]
. . . Et videntes . . . eum adoraverunt . . . dubitaverunt. . . . [Mat. 28:17.]
. . . Data est michi . . . omnis potestas in celo et terra. . . . [Mat 28:19.]
. . . gloria et nonores . . . sunt pedibus ejus. . . . [cf. Ps. 8:6; Heb. 2:7-9.]

1302
Saturday in Easter Week

Homily of Blessed Gregory

1303
. . . non prius quod spiritale est : sed quod animale. . . . [1 Cor. 15:46.]

1304
. . . ab ortus . . . usque ad occasum . . . [cf. Ps. 112:3.]
. . . mediatorem Dei . . . Jesum Christum . . . [Augustine, De Civitate Dei Liber XXI:xvi.]

First Sunday after Easter (Sunday in the Octave of Easter)
Minor Double Feast

Second Sunday after Easter

Third Sunday after Easter

Fourth Sunday after Easter

Fifth Sunday after Easter
Minor Privileged Sunday

Ascension
Principal Double Feast

Friday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Saturday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Sunday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Monday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Tuesday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Wednesday in the Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

The Octave of the Ascension
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Pentecost
Principal Double Feast

Monday in Pentecost Week
Minor Double Feast

Tuesday in Pentecost Week
Minor Double Feast

Wednesday in Pentecost Week
Minor Double Feast

1577
Trinity
Major Double Feast
Thomas Becket’s first act after his consecration as Archbishop of Canterbury on the Sunday after Pentecost, 1162 was to ordain that the day of his consecration be held as a festival in honour of the Holy Trinity. This observance spread from Canterbury throughout the whole of western Christendom. Pope John XXII extended this observance to the whole of the Western Church 1334.

The image (from the Breviary, 1531) represents heaven and earth. The text is excerpted from the ‘Te Deum’. The upper portion features the Father and the Son with a Dove representing the Holy Spirit.  It would appear that the Father and Son are holding an open book, possibly representing the Law.  Surrounding the Godhead are angels and the heavenly host. In the lower portion the Church is portrayed as the portal of heaven, to which clergy (on the left, led by a pope and bishops) and lay (on the right, led by a king and nobles) are flocking in attitudes of prayer.

The Office was composed by Stephen of Liège (850-920).
It would seem that this office was celebrated by the Anglo-Saxon Church by the early 11th century. (Barbara C. Raw, ‘The Office of the Trinity in the Crowland Psalter’ Anglo Saxon England XXVIII (1999): 185-186. (Note that Barbara Raw casts doubt that this is the in fact the office composed by Stephen of Liege (p. 187).)
This is the earliest Office in the Sarum Use that contains substantial versified elements. This seems to be also the only versified office that was retained in the Breviarium Romanum 1568 of the Tridentine reform.
The Office composed by John Peckham (Archbishop of Canterbury 1279-92), appears in the Franciscan influenced Breviarium Romanum, 1529. In the Dominican influenced Breviarium Romanum 1568, the Trinity Office is based on that by Stephen of Liège.
See Kate Helsen, ‘Two Trinity Offices Compared’, William Renwick, ed., Chant Old and New/Plain-Chant: l’ancien et le nouveau (Lion’s Bay: The Institute of Medieval Music, 2012):149-187, and Barbara C. Raw, ‘The Office of the Trinity in the Crowland Psalter’ Anglo Saxon England XXVIII (1999): 185-200.

First Vespers
1 Ant. Gloria tribi Trinitas
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (8.8.8.8). It appears as a doxology to the Lenten hymns in the Anglo-Saxon ‘Canterbury Hymnal’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 114v-115v. It also appears in the late 10th c. Bosworth Psalter, BL MS Add 37517:115r, 126r. See Gernot R. Wieland, The Canterbury Hymnal (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1982): 72-75. It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

1578
2 Ant. Laus et perennis gloria
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (8.8.8.8). It appears as the doxology for the hymn ‘Deus tuorum militum’ in the ‘Canterbury Hymnal’ British Library MS Add. 37517, fo. 126r (Wieland, p. 123), and concludes the same hymn in the pre and post-Tridentine Roman traditions (e.g. Breviarium Romanum (Paris, 1529), fo C-60r; Breviarium Romanum (Rome, 1568): 900. It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

3 Ant. Gloria laudis resonet in ore
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (11.11.11.5). It appears as the doxology of the hymn ‘Christe Salvator hominis’ for St. Vedast by Alcuin (c. 735 804)(AH-L, #109, p. 154-155.). It does not appear as a hymn-doxology in the Sarum Use.

1579
4 Ant. Laus Deo Patri geniteque proli
The text is a rhymed and metered hymn-doxology (11.11.11.5). It appears in AH-4:46 as the doxology to the hymn ‘Virga de Jesse generata stirpe’. It shares text elements with the doxology ‘Gloria Patri geniteque proli’ attached to the hymn for virgins, ‘Viriginis proles’, which text is also used for Responsory 5 (below). The common text in CANTUS begins ‘Laus Deo Patri parilique proli’.

5 Ant. Ex quo omnia (cf. I Cor 8:6; Rom. 11:36.)
The text is based on Augustine (Confessions 1.2.2) ‘ex quo omnia, per quem omnia, in quo omnia’ (‘of whom are all things, by whom are all things, in whom are all things’). It is echoed in Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55: ‘A quo, per quem, in quo omnia, o beata Trinitas.’

1580
Hymn. Adesto Sancta Trinitas
Being that the earliest record of this hymn is an 11th c. manuscript (British Library Vesp. D. xii. f. 115b.), it is not entirely clear whether this hymn is part of the original office composed by Stephen of Liège. See John Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology (New York: Scribner’s, 1892): 22.

1581
V. Benedicamus Patrem
This is a doxological verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53].

Ant. Gratias tibi Deus
In William Laud, Works, (Oxford: John Henry Parker, 1853) III: 62), this text is described as coming from St. Augustine’s Orat. de 5. Heures, cap. vii.g., the first part of a Prayer: ‘Gratias tibi Deus ; Gratias tibi vera et una Trinitas, una et trina Veriatas, trina et una Unitas. Gratias tibi, Deus Pater, qui Filium tuum ostendisti, et mihi doctorem dedisti. O et semper des in misericordia antiquis. Amen.’
This text is found in Hincmar of Rheims (806-882), ‘De una et non trina deitate’ (PL-125 0510D) II.

1582
Matins

Invit. Deum verum unum
This Invitatory text appears in the Portiforium Wulstani II:48, and in the Hyde Breviary II:130r.

1583
1 Ant. Adesto Deus unus omnipotens
This text appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

2 Ant. Te Unum in substantia
This text (like the previous one) appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

3 Ant. Te semper idem esse vivere
This text (like the previous two) appears in John Allen Giles, ed. Miscellaneous Works of the Venerable Bede, Vol. I (1843): 243, under the heading ‘In laudem Dei oratio pura’. The same text appears attributed to Alcuin in Alcuini Opera Omnia II (1863): 54, under the heading ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’

1584
Lesson. Credimus Sanctam Trinitatem
The first six Lessons are taken from Alcuin’s (ca. 735–804) De fide Sanctae Trinitatis et de incarnatione Christi. See PL 101:56-58.
Trans. WR.
In the Breviarium Romanum 1529 the Lessons are from Isaiah, Augustine, and Gregory of Nanzianus.

1 Resp. Benedicat nos Deus (Ps. 66:7-8; 2.)

1585
2 Resp. Benedictus Dominus Deus Israel (Ps. 71:18-19. (Gallican))

1587
3 Resp. Quis Deus magnus (Ps. 76:14-16. (Gallican))

4 Ant. Te invocamus
This is the first of eight pieces in this office that conclude with ‘o beata Trinitas’. The other are the following five Antiphons, the seventh Responsory, and the fifth Antiphon of Lauds.
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

1588
5 Ant. Spes nostra
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

6 Ant. Libera nos
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:56.

Verse. Benedictus es Domine (Dan. 3:56.)

1589
4 Resp. Magnus Dominus (Ps. 146:5 (Gallican); 144:3.)
This Responsory, though strictly Biblical, contains elements of rhyme and metre.

1590
5 Resp. Gloria Patri geniteque proli
The text is a hymn-doxology in the form of a Sapphic stanza (11.11.11.5). It typically appears at the conclusion of the hymn for virgins, ‘Virginis proles opifexque matris’. [847].
The Verse (8.8.8.8) is the second strophe is some versions of the hymn ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’, but is apparently not part of the original hymn. See John Julian, A Dictionary of Hymnology (New York: Scribner’s, 1892): 1207.

1591
6 Resp. Honor virtus et potestas

1592
7 Ant. Charitas Pater est
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

8 Ant. Verax est Pater
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

1593
9 Ant. Una igitur Pater
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL-101:55.

Verse. Verbo Domini (Ps. 32:6.)

Homily. Sicut ex lectione sancti evangelii
This Homily appears in The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede, Vol. V. Homilies (ed. J. A. Giles) (London: Whittaker & co, 1843): 109. Its attribution to Bede is in question.
Trans. WR.
Another English translation appears in Lawrence T. Martin and David Hurst, Bede the Venerable: Homilies on the Gospels (Cistercian Publications) 2.18.

1594
7 Resp. Tibi laus tibi gloria (V. Dan. 3:52.)
The text of the Responsory is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:55.

1595
8 Resp. Benedicamus Patrem et Filium
The Responsory is a doxological Verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53].
The Verse. (Dan. 3:56.) is also from the ‘Benedicite’.
Both of these texts are used as Versicles in this Office.

1596
9 Resp. Summe Trinitati

1597
Verse. Benedictus es Domine
This is repeated from the Second Nocturn.

Lauds
The Antiphons at Lauds have Verses, as are commonly found in this Office.
1 Ant. O beata et benedicta
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria

1598
2 Ant. O beata benedicta gloriosa
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Miserere miserere

3 Ant. O vera summa sempiterna
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the first Antiphon.

1599
4 Ant. O vera summa sempiterna
The text is from Alcuin’s ‘Invocatio ad Ss. Trinitatem, et fidei symbolum ejusdem.’ PL 101:56.
Verse. Miserere miserere
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the second Antiphon.

5 Ant. Te jure laudant
This Antiphon also appears at Prime on Sundays, where it is attached to the ‘Quicunque vult’. While the text follows the style of the previous Antiphons, its origin has yet to be identified.
Verse. Tibi laus tibi gloria
This Verse repeats the text of the Verse for the first and third Antiphons.

1600
Hymn. O Pater sancte mitis
Author unknown. Sapphic stanza, 11 11 11 5.

1601
Verse. Sit nomen Domini (Ps. 112:2.)

1603
Resp. Benedicamus Patrem
This is a doxological Verse from the liturgically edited ‘Benedicite omnia opera’ (Daniel 3:57 ff.) See p. [53]. See the Verse at First Vespers.

1604
Resp. Benedictus es Domine (Dan. 3:56.)
This text is repeated from the Versicle of the Second Nocturn.

1605
Resp. Verbo Domini (Ps. 32:6.)
This text is repeated from the Versicle of the Third Nocturn.

1606
Ant. Te Deum Patrem ingenitum
This Antiphon also appears at Prime on Sundays, where it is attached to the ‘Quicunque vult’.

1607
Ferias after Trinity
Lessons. Confitemur et credimus sanctam
These three readings are taken from the spurious De Trinitate confessio (PL 12 0958D) ascribed to Eusebius Vercellensis (283–371).
The Lessons are taken from the Eleventh Council of Toledo Symbol of Faith, November 7, 675.

1609
Corpus Christi
Major Double Feast

At First Vespers
1 Ant. Sacerdos in eternum

1610
2 Ant. Miserator Dominus

3 Ant. Calicem salutaris accipiam

4 Ant. Sicut novelle olivarum

1611
5 Ant. Qui pacem ponit

Chapter. Dominus Jesus in qua nocte

Resp. Homo quidam fecit
This Melody is used as the tenor in Tallis’ motet ‘Homo quidam fecit’.

1612
Hymn. Sacris solemnis
In the Penpont Antiphonal ff 131v and 132r, the Hymn ‘Pange lingua’ (of Matins) appears in place of ‘Sacris solemnis’, and vice versa.

1614
V. Panem de celo

Ant. O quam suavis

1615
Prayer. Deus qui nobis sub sacramento

At Matins
Invit. Christum Regem adoremus

1616
Hymn. Pange lingua
In the Penpont Antiphonal ff 131v and 132r, the Hymn ‘Sacris solemnis’ (of First Vespers) appears in place of ‘Pange lingua’, and vice versa.

1618
1 Ant. Fructum salutiferum

2 Ant. A fructu frumenti

1619
3 Ant. Communione calicis

V. Panem celi

Lessons. Immensa divine largitatis

1620
1 Resp. Immolabit hedum

1621
2 Resp. Comedetis carnes

1622
3 Resp. Respexit Helyas

1623
4 Ant. Memor sit Dominus

5 Ant. Paratur nobis mensa Domini

1624
In voce exultationis

V. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

1625
4 Resp. Panis quem ego dabo

1626
5 Resp. Cenantibus illis

1627
6 Resp. Accepit Jesus calicem

1628
7 Ant. Introibo ad altare Dei

1629
8 Ant. Cibavit nos Dominus

9 Ant. Ex altari tuo

V. Educas panem de terra

1630
Sermon of Augustine. Cum vero cibo et potu

7 Resp. Qui manducat meam carnem

1631
8 Resp. Misit me Pater vivens

1632
9 Resp. Unus panis et unum corpus

1633
Before Lauds
V. Panem de celo

At lauds
1 Ant. Sapientia edificavit

2 Ant. Angelorum esca nutrivisti

1634
3 Ant. Pinguis est panis

4 Ant. Sacerdotes sancti incensum

5 Ant. Vincenti dabo manna

1635
Hymn. Verbum supernum prodiens

1636
V. Posuit fines tuos pacem

1637
Ant. Ego sum panis vivus

At Terce

1638
Resp. Panem celi dedit eis

V. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

At Sext
Chapter. Quotienscunque manducabitis

Resp. Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti

1639
V. Educas panem de terra

At None
Chapter. Quicunque manducaverit panem

Resp. Educas panem de terra

1640
V. Posuit fines tuos pacem

At Second Vespers
Ant. O sacrum convivium

Friday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Saturday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Sunday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Before the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi, this day was ‘Deus omnium’, the first of the ordinary Sundays of the ‘Summer’ Season. With the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi with Octave,

Monday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Tuesday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Wednesday in the Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

The Octave of Corpus Christi
Of the Octave with Rulers of the Choir

Second Sunday after the Feast of the Trinity
Since the institution of the Feast of Corpus Christi with Octave, this Sunday has become ‘Deus omnium’ the first of the ordinary Sundays of the summer season.

1717
Invit. Laudemus Jesum Christum quia
This Invitatory is unique to Sarum in CANTUS. Related is also ‘Laudemus Jesum Christum in conversions’ {202} for the Feast of St. Paul.

1798
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of August
Minor Privileged Sunday

1825
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of September
Minor Privileged Sunday

1848
First Sunday after the Third of the Ides of September
Minor Privileged Sunday

1869
First Sunday after the Twelfth of the Kalends of October
Minor Privileged Sunday

1889
First Sunday after the fifth the Kalends of October
Minor Privileged Sunday

1927
First Sunday after the Fifth of the Kalends of November
Minor Privileged Sunday

2018
Feast of the Dedication of the Church
Principal Double Feast

The days within the Octave and the Octave Day of the Dedication are with Rulers of the Choir, provided that the Feast falls outside of Advent and Septuagesimatide.