Companion to C: Sanctorale 2: August-November

previous . . .
{926}

August 1: Peter in Chains
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.
‘This feast was originally the dedication feast of the church of the Apostle [Peter], erected on the Esquiline Hill, [Rome], in the fourth century. The church was rebuilt by Sixtus III (432-40) at the expense of the Byzantine imperial family. Either the solemn consecration took place on 1 August, or this was the day of dedication of the earlier church. Perhaps this day was selected to replace the heathen festivities which took place on 1 August. In this church, which is still standing (S. Pietro in Vincoli), were probably preserved from the fourth century St. Peter’s chains, which were greatly venerated, small filings from the chains being regarded as precious relics.’ (‘St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles’, Catholic Encyclopedia (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11744a.htm).)
Many of the chants in this feast are found only rarely outside of Sarum. This is a surprising occurrence in view of the wide distribution of the Office in the west.

First Vespers
Ant. Solve jubente
This Antiphon also appears on the feast of St. Peter’s Chair (February 22).

Chapter. Petrus quidem servabatur

Hymn. Jam bone pastor

{927}
V. In omnem terram

Ant. Tu es pastor ovium
This Antiphon also appears on the feast of St. Peter’s Chair.

Prayer. Deus qui beatum Petrum apostolum a vinculis

{928}
Memorial of the Maccabees, Martyrs
Prayer. Fraterna nos Domine

Matins
Invit. Tu es pastor ovium

{929}
1 Ant. Misit Herodes rex
This Antiphon is found in only three non-Sarum source in CANTUS.

2 Ant. Videns autem quia
This Antiphon is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

3 Ant. Petrus quidem servabatur

{930}
Lessons. Notandum est fratres charissimi, qua de causa

1 Resp. Misit impius Herodes
This Responsory is only found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{931}
2 Resp. Videns autem callidus
This Responsory is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{932}
Lesson. Exultemus in Domino dilectissimi,et spirituali

{933}
3 Resp. Cumque tyrannus immitis
This Responsory is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

4 Ant. Erat Petrus dormiens

{934}
5 Ant. Cunque producturus eum
This Antiphon is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{935}
6 Ant. Exiens Petrus apostolus

{936}
4 Resp. Petrus quidem apostolus
This Responsory is only found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{937}
5 Resp. Cum vero producturus eum
This Responsory is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{938}
6 Resp. Ecce angelus Domini
This Responsory is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{939}
7 Ant. Transeuntes primam et secundam
This Antiphon is only found in Sarum sources in CANTUS.

8 Ant. Et exeuntes processerunt
This Antiphon is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{940}
9 Ant. Petrus ad se reversus dixit

Homily of Augustine. Domino Jesu Christo requirente

7 Resp. Surge Petre et induete

{942}
8 Resp. Dixit angelus ad Petrum
This Responsory is found in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{944}
9 Resp. Quodcumque ligaveris

{945}
Before Lauds

V. Tu es Petrus

Lauds
1 Ant. Angelus Domini astitit

{946}
2 Ant. Dixit angelus ad Petrum : circunda tibi

3 Ant. Exiens Petrus sequebatur eum
This Antiphon is found in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS, A-Gu 30 and F-R 248.

{947}
4 Ant. Misit Dominus angelum suum

5 Ant. Solve jubente Deo

Ant. Quodcnque ligaveris

{948}
Memorial of the Martyrs

Prime

Terce

{949}
Sext
Chapter. Angelus Domini astitit

None
Chapter. Exiens Petrus sequebatur

Second Vespers
Ant. Petrus ad se reversus dixit

{950}
Memorial of St. Stephen
Prayer. Deus qui nos beati Stephani martyris tui

{951}
August 2: St. Stephen
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Stephen I (Bishop of Rome 254-257).

This feast has no first or second vespers.

Lessons. Beatus Stephanus episcopus urbis Rome

{952}
August 3: The Invention of (the relics of) Saint Stephen
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

First Vespers
Ant. Ostendit sanctus Gamaliel

{953)
Prayer. Deus qui es sanctorum tuorum splendor

Matins
Invit. Adoremus regem magnum Dominum

{954}
1 Ant. Luciano venerabili presbytero

2 Ant. Dum adhuc pene vigilaret

{955}
3 Ant. Vidit igitur assistere

Lessons. Lucianus presbyter

{956}
1 Resp. Beatus Gamaliel doctoris gentium

{957}
2 Resp. Igitur dissimulata Gamaliel

{959}
3 Resp. Vade Luciane

{960}
4 Ant. Vir Dei Gamaliel

5 Ant. Iste etenim maximo digni sunt

{961}
6 Ant. Cum ergo sint apud Deum

4 Resp. Lucianus presbyter dixit

{963}
5 Resp. Cum scirem ego Gamaliel

{965}
6 Resp. Sacerdos Dei Lucianus

{966}
7 Ant. In jejuniis et orationibus

8 Ant. Nonne vides quanta sit siccitas

{967}
9 Ant. Surge ergo et vade

{968}
7 Resp. Sanctus Gamaliel in visu

{969}
8 Resp. Vides o frater Luciane

{971}
9 Resp. Sanctus Johannes episcopus

{972}
Ante laudes
V. Justi autem in perpetuum

Lauds
1 Ant. Regressus Lucianus

{973}
2 Ant. Apparuit sanctus Gamaliel

3 Ant. Ibi olim positi fuimus

{974}
4 Ant. Audiens ergo Lucianus

5 Ant. Dum inventum esset sacratissimum

{975}
V. Mirabilis Deus

Ant. Ex odoris mira

{976)
Prime

Terce

Sext

None

Second Vespers

{977)
Ant. Hodie sanctus Johannes

(978}
August 5: Saint Oswald, King and Martyr
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

6(ca. 604-642), King of Northumbria; translated 909, because of Viking raids, to Gloucester.
A rhymed monastic Office for Saint Oswald is found in AH 13-81, and an Antiphon at AH 28 app. (See Andrew Hughes, ‘British Rhymed Offices’, Music in the Medieval English Liturgy, ed. Susan Rankin and David Hiley (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993):271.
The Sarum Use provides three Lessons (from Bede’s history) and a Prayer.
The York Use provides six Lessons which are different.

Prayer. Omnipotens sempiterne deus, qui hujus diei jocundam

Lessons. Regnavit Oswaldus rex

{980}
Saint Dominic
The rubric indicates that this Office is not part of the Sarum Kalendar.

(1170– August 6, 1221) Founder of the Dominican Order. Canonized in 1234.
Dominic is more typically commemorated on August 4 (or 8).

Prayer. Deus qui ecclesiam tuam beati Dominici

{981}
August 5: Blessed Virgin Mary of the Snows
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.
This Feast would appear to take the place of Saint Oswald.

The Use of Sarum does not provide for a class of feasts of nine lessons with a simple invitatory.  In order to conform to Sarum practice, the invitatory should be duple.

This is the Feast of the Dedication of the Basilica of St Mary Major in Rome.
This local Feast was extended throughout Rome in 14th c., and presumably spread from there. It was perhaps adopted at Sarum in the 16th. c. because of its Marian theme.
Apparently entered the general Roman calendar as late as the Breviarium Romanum of 1568.
This Office was however clearly in wide circulation at an earlier date. It appears in 9 CANTUS sources, the earliest being a 13th c. Italian Franciscan source, the other sources generally of the late 14th and early 15th centuries.
The Sarum Use provides the text only, in the printed Breviaries of 1516 and 1531. Sarum music survives only for the items that are repeated from other feasts, particularly the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin (September 8). In the edition music has been adopted from other sources to make performance possible.

Ant. Sancta Maria sucurre miseris
The text of this Antiphon is taken from Sermo IX, De Annuntiatione Dominica by Bishop Fulbert of Chartres (ca 951-ca 1029). The prayer is sometimes attributed to St. Augustine, Book 10, Sermon 18, de Sanctis, since Bishop Fulbert’s sermon appeared in the collected works of St. Augustine at one time.

First Vespers
Ant. Sancta Maria, sucurre miseris

{982}
Matins
Invit. Sancta Maria Dei genitrix

Lessons. Tempore quo Liberius papa

{983}
1 Resp. Sancta et immaculata virginitas

{984}
2 Resp. Congratulamini michi

{985}
3 Resp. Continet in gremio

{986}
4 Resp. Sicut cedrus exaltata sum

{987}
5 Resp. Que est ista

{988}
6 Resp. Ornatam monilibus

{989}
Sermon of the Venerable Bede. Magne devotionis et fidei

{990}
7 Resp. Beatam me dicen omnes generationes

{991}
8 Resp. Felix namque

{992}
The omission of a ninth responsory and versicle before Lauds may be an indication that this office is not part of the standard Sarum repertoire. It seems likely that these omissions would have been supplied from other parts of the liturgy, likely the responsory ‘Stirps Jesse’ or ‘Super salutem’, and the V. ‘Ora pro nobis’.

Lauds
V. Diffusa est gratia

Ant. Beata es mareia que credidisti

{993}
Prime

Terce

Sext

None

Second Vespers

Ant. Beatam me dicent omnes generationes

{995}
August 6: The Transfiguration
Minor Double Feast

This feast originated in the in 9th c. In 1457, Pope Callistus III extended the feast throughout the Latin church in memory of the victory over the Turks at Belgrade in, the news of which reached Rome on August 6.
Rather than exhibiting versified chants as is typical of later offices, this office generally uses prose, since the texts are largely taken from the Bible.
The Sarum music appears only in the 1520 Antiphonale.
Some of the chants appear to be later additions to the Gregorian repertoire:
First Vespers, Ants. 2,3,4,5, and Resp.
Matins, Invit., Ants. 3 and 5.
Lauds, Ant. 2, and Ant. on Benedictus.
Second Vespers, Resp. and Ant. on Magnificat.

First Vespers
The Antiphons of First Vespers are in modal order.

1 Ant. Assumpsit Jesus

{996}
2 Ant. Dum transfiguraretur Jesus

3 Ant. Tunc Petrus dixit ad Jesum

4 Ant. Adhuc eo loquente

{997}
5 Ant. De qua vox insonuit

Chapter. Salvatorem expectamus

Resp. Assumens Jesus Petrum
The Verse ‘Ne videntes’ is in rhyme.

{998}
Hymn. Celestis formam glorie
Anon.

{1002}
V. Adoremus Patrem et Filium

Ant. Visionem quam vidistis
This Antiphon is somewhat versified: 8p7pp 8pp7pp.

Prayer. Deus qui nos sacrum transfirgurationis

{1003}
Memorial of the Martyrs

Prayer. Deus qui nos concedis sanctorum martyrum

Matins
Invit. Christum Regem regum
This Invitatory is in rhyme and metre.

{1005}
Hymn. O Sator rerum
Anon.
This Hymn appear in only one CANTUS source, I-BV 20 (Beneventan).

{1007}
The Antiphons of Matins are in modal order.

1 Ant. Hodie Dominus Jesus Christus facie

2 Ant. Ecce nubes lucida

{1008}
3 Ant. Petrus et qui cum illo

V. Celi aperti sunt

Lessons. Petrus ad predicationem mortis Dominice

{1009}
The Responsories of Matins are in modal order.

1 Resp. Assumptus hodie
This Responsory does not appear in CANTUS.

{1010}
2 Resp. Coram tribus discipulis

{1012}
3 Resp. Primogenitus prodii

{1013}
4 Ant. Respondens Petrus ait ad Jesum

5 Ant. Accedentes discipuli

{1014}
6 Ant. Ante duos vates

V. Adorate Dominum

(1015)
4 Resp. Claruit magnitudo Dei
This Responsory does not appear in CANTUS.

{1016}
5 Resp. Hodie in monte

{1017}
6 Resp. Discipuli Christi nubis lucide

{1018}
7 Ant. Celi aperti sunt super eum

{1019}
8 Ant. vox de celo sonuit

9 Ant. Visionem quam vidistis

{1020}
V. Domine miserere nostri

Homily. Quoniam evangelica lectio dilectissimi

7 Resp. Hodie Pater de celis

{1021}
8 Resp. Descendentibus illis
The Verse is in metre and rhyme.

{1023}
9 Resp. Videns Petrus Moysen

{1024}
V. Adoremus Patrem et Filium

{1025}
Lauds
1 Ant. Accessit Jesus

2 Ant. Jesus ad discipulos jacentes

{1026}
3 Ant. Ut testimonium haberet

4 Ant. Lex per Moysen

5 Ant. Descendentibus illis

{1027}
Hymn. O nata lux
Anon.

{1031}
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictus

Ant. Tribus discipulis

{1032}
Prayer. Deus qui Unigenitum tuum hodierna die mirabiliter

Prime
Resp. Jesu Christe Fili Dei vivi.

Terce

{1033}
Resp. Adoremus Patrem et Filium

V dies sanctificatus

Sext
Chapter. Notam facimus vobis

Resp. Dies sanctificatus

{1034}
None
Chapter. Accepit Dominus Jesus a Deo

Resp. Adorate Dominum

{1035}
V. Adorate Deum

Second Vespers

Second Vespers of the Transfiguration in later years was superceded by First Vespers of the Most Sweet Name of Jesus. In that case only a Memorial of the Transfiguration would be sung here, as indicated on {1051}.

Resp. Confirmandis et ad veri cultus

{1036}
Ant. Hodie ad Patris vocem

{1038}
August 7: The Feast of the Most Sweet Name of Jesus
Major Double Feast

This Feast developed under the influence of John of Vercelli, OP, 1205-83 (after 1274) and Beranardino of Sienna, a Franciscan 1380-1444. Walter Frere indicates its establishment in 1457 or 1480 (Graduale Sarisburiense:xxix.). It was officially adopted by the Franciscans in 1530; however it became universal (in the Roman Church) only in 1721.
It appears in Sarum printed Breviaries from 1494, and in the 1520 Antiphonale.
(The calendar of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer stipulates a festival “The Name of Jesus” to be observed on 7 August as had been the practice in Durham, Salisbury and York and Aberdeen. (Catholic Encyclopedia.)
In the Sarum Rite this feast is provided with a full Octave, squeezed in between the Transfiguration and the Assumption.

The texts are generally very closely connected to biblical sources, and thus are generally not in rhyme or metre. Most of the music is uniquely found in the 1520 Antiphonale.

I am tempted to expand on Andrew Hughes’s comment regarding the taking of of classical meters as a signal of Renaissance sensibility (‘British Rhymed Offices’, Music in the Medieval English Liturgy, Susan Rankin and David Hiley, eds. (Oxford:Clarendon Press, 1993):271), and to suggest that the reversion to texts of a more bibilical derivation, neither metered nor rhymed, represents a new kind of fundamentalism, the result of which was, in the Breviarium Romanum of 1568, a wholesale excision rhymed offices in favour of a biblical emphasis. At the same time came an excision of virtually all of the chant in the later style.
Devotion to Mary and to Jesus in an personal way, as exemplified in this office, represents a new sensibility that touches upon values espoused by reformers both protestant and catholic, and signals the waning of the Medieval church.

The introduction of the Feasts of the Transfiguration and the Holy Name caused considerable change to the Sarum Kalendar, as summarized below.

Date Old Kalendar New Kalendar
August 5 Oswaldi Oswaldi
August 6 Sixti Transfiguration
August 7 Donati Holy Name
August 8 Cyriaci Oct. Holy Name
August 9 Romani Oct. Holy Name
August 10 Lawrence Lawrence
August 11 Tiburtius Oct. Holy Name
August 12 Oct. of Lawrence Oct. Holy Name
August 13 Ipolitus Ipolitus
August 14 Eusebius Octave of the Holy Name
August 15 Assumption Assumption

Several of the chants are found in two 16th. c. Augsburg sources in CANTUS, D-Mbs Clm 4304 and D-Mbs Clm 4306.

First Vespers
The Antiphons at First Vespers are in modal order.

1 Ant. A solis
This Antiphon appears in two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS, but with a different chant.

{1039}
2 Ant. Omnis enim quicumque

3 Ant. Dirupisti Domine vincula mea

In this antiphon the punctuation does not align with the verse structure.

4 Ant. Illuc ascenderunt tribus

{1040}
5. Ant. In conspectu angelorum

In this antiphon the punctuation does not align with the verse structure.

{1041}
Resp. Magnificate Dominum mecum
This Responsory does not appear in CANTUS

{1042}
Hymn. Exultet cor precordiis

In St. Helen’s Church, Ranworth, is preserved a remarkable double lectern on which has been pasted the doxology (V. 6) of this hymn. This Ranworth example elides ‘Patre et’, omitting the second A; further, the ‘Amen’ appears to be set GAG.G.

{1046}
V. Omnis terra adoret te

Ant. Ego autem in Domino gaudebo
This Antiphon has the same incipit at CANTUS 205504, but the text is longer that that found in the two CANTUS sources.

{1047}
Prayer. Deus qui gloriosissimum nomen

Memorial of the Transfiguration
Ant. Hodie ad Patris vocem

V. Adoremus Patrem et Filium

{1048}
Prayer. Deus qui Unigenitum tuum hodierna die mirabiliter

Compline
This compline, being a late addition, does not figure among the numbered complines in the Psalter.

Ant. Miserere michi Domine secundum

This Antiphon is based on the ordinary Antiphon of Compline, Miserere michi [372].

Seq. Alma chorus Domini
The conclusion of the text of this Sequence, as it appears at Compline of Pentecost, is modified from ‘Salvificet nos. Sit cui secla. Per omnia doxa.’ to ‘Nominibus his. Signatur Jesus. Sint Domino laudes’. This seems to be unique to Sarum sources.

{1050}
Ant. O Rex gloriose

{1051}
Matins
Invit. Honoremus exaltemus
This Invitatory is in metre and rhyme.

Hymn. Jesu dulcis memoria
attributed to St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153).
The use of the Christmas melody (Christe Redemptor omnium) associates this feast with the incarnation.

{1053}
The antiphons of matins are in modal order.

1 Ant. Hii in curribus

{1054}
2 Ant. Memor ero nominis tui

3 Ant. Secundum nomen tuum
This Antiphon is in rhyme.

V. Laudabo nomen Dei

{1055}
The Responsories are in modal order.

1 Resp. Tu es ipse Rex meus

{1057}
2 Resp. Salvos fac nos Domine
This Responsory, borrowed from Saturday per annum, is found in several CANTUS sources, but with different verses.

{1058}
3 Resp. Osculetur me

{1059}
4 Ant. Deus in nomine tuo

{1060}
5 Ant. Sic psalmum dicam

6 Ant. Sit nome ejus
This Antiphon is in rhyme.

V. Benedic anima mea

{1061}
4 R. In semita judiciorum

{1063}
5 Resp. Obsecro autem vos

{1064}
6 Resp. Jesu Nazarenus

{1065}
7 Ant. Adjuva nos Deus

{1066}
8 Ant. Confitebor tibi Domine

9 Ant. Afferte Domino patrie gentium

V. Non nobis Domine

{1067}
7 Resp. Ecce concipies et paries
This Responsory is commonly found at the Feast of the Annunciation.

{1069}
8 Resp. Cum appropinquaret Jesus

{1072}
9 Resp. Hec autem scripta sunt

{1071}
V. Adjutorium nostrum in nomine Domini

{1072}
Lauds
The Antiphons of Lauds are in modal order.

1 Ant. Vocatum est nomen ejus Jesus

2 Ant. Laudate nomen Domini nostri

{1073}
3 Ant. Benedicam te Domine

4 Ant. Justi tulerunt spolia

{1074}
5 Ant. Juvenes et virgines

Hymn. Jesu auctor clementie

{1079}
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictus

Ant. Joseph fili David

{1080}
Terce
Resp. Laudabo nomen Dei

V. Benedic anima mea

Sext

{1081}
Resp. Benedic anima mea

V. Non nobis Domine

None

{1082}
Resp. Non nobis Domine

V. Sit nomen Domini

Second Vespers
V. Omnis terra adoret

{1083}
Ant. Exurgens autem Joseph

‘. . . antiphone et psalmi sicut in prima die . . .’  During the octave there would be only one antiphon on the psalms at vespers and lauds, Vocatum est, the first antiphon of lauds of the day.

{1084}
August 6: Saint Sixtus and Companions
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.
This Feast was superseded by the Feast of the Transfiguration.

(d. August 6, 258) Bishop of Rome (257-258).

{1085}
August 7: Saint Donatus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.
This Feast was superseded by the Feast of the Holy Name.

(d. August 7, 362?) Bishop of Arezzo.

{1086}
August 8: Second Day in the Octave of the Holy Name

{1088)
August 9: Third Day in the Octave of the Holy Name

{1088)
August 10: Saint Lawrence
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.
(c. 225–August 10, 258, Rome) Deacon.

In the older kalendars this feast has a vigil.

August 11: Fifth Day in the Octave of the Holy Name

{1089}
August 12: Sixth Day in the Octave of the Holy Name

Vespers of Saint Hippolytus

(1090}
August 13: Seventh Day in the Octave of the Holy Name; Saint Hippolytus
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(170, Rome–235, Sardinia)

{1091}
August 14: Octave Day of the Holy Name

{1093}
Second Day of the Holy Name
Lessons. Quem non libet de consolationis

{1095}
Third Day of the Holy Name
Lessons. Nostra rursum replicat

{1096}
Memorial of St. Romanus
Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut qui beati Romani

{1097}
August 10: Fourth Day of the Octave of the Holy Name: St. Lawrence

First Vespers
Ant. Puer meus noli timere
Although this Antiphon is catalogued as 004411 in CANTUS, its text is shorter, omitting the last phrase, ‘et odor ignis non erit in te’. As such, this Antiphon is unique to Sarum in CANTUS.

Chap. Qui parce seminat

V. Dispersit dedit pauperibus

Ant. Beatus Laurentius

{1098}
Prayer. Presta quesumus omnipotens Deus, ut triumphum

{1099}
Matins
Invit. Regem sempiternum

1 Ant. Quo progrederis

The Antiphons for matins of St. Lawrence have verses.

{1100}
2 Ant. Noli me derelinquere

3 Ant. Non ego te desero

{1101}
Lessons. Post passionem beati Sixti

1 Resp. Levita Laurentius

{1103}
2 Resp. Quo progrederis

{1105}
3 Resp. Noli me derelinquere

{1106}
4 Ant. Beatus Laurentius orabat

5 Ant. Beatus Laurentius dixit

{1107}
6 Ant. Dixit Romanus ad

{1108}
4 Resp. Beauts Laurentius clamavit

{1109}
5 Resp. Strinxerunt corporis membra

{1111}
6 Resp. Beatus Laruentius dixit

7 Ant. Strinxerutn corporis membra

{1112}
8 Ant. Igne me examinasti

9 Ant. Interrogatus te

{1113}
Homily of Blessed Augustine. Agnoscit fides vestra granum

7 Resp. In craticula

{1115}
8 Resp. Gaudeo plane

{1116}
9 Resp. Meruit esse hostia Christi

{1117}
Resp. fer. O Ypolite si credideris

{1118}
Lauds
1 Ant. Laurentius ingressus

2 Ant. Laurentius bonum opus

3 Ant. Adhesit anima mea

{1119}
4 Ant. Misit Dominus angelum suum

5 Ant. Beatus Laurentius orabat

{1120}
Ant. In craticula te Deum

Prayer. Da nobis quesumus omnipotens Deus, viciorum

Prime

Terce

{1121}
Sext
Chapter. Potens est autem Deus

None
Chapter. Qui autem administrat semen

Second Vespers
Ant. Veni desiderator bone veni

{1122}
Memorial of St. Tiburtius
Ant. Inclytus martyr Tyburtius

{1123}
Prayer. Beati Tyburtii martyris tui

{1124}
Fifth day of the Holy Name
Lessons. Gaudia festi contemplantes

{1126}
Sixth day of the Holy Name
Lessons. Avida mens hominum

{1128}
Seventh day of the Holy Name: St. Hippolitus
Vespers
Prayer. Da quesumus omnipotens Deus : ut beati Ipoliti

Matins

{1129}
Lessons. Post tertium diem sepulture

7 Resp. Beatissimus Christi martyr Laurentius

{1130}
8 Resp. Requisitus a Decio

{1132}
9 Resp. Expoliavit veste Ipolitum
This Responsory is unique to Sarum in CANTUS.

{1133}
Lauds
1 Ant. Dixit Cesar ad Ipolitum

2 Ant. Dixit Ipolitus ad Decium

{1134}
3 Ant. Cesar dixit ad Ipolitum

4 Ant. Exemplum merear fieri

5 Ant. Tunc Valerianus

{1135}
V. Mirabilis Deus

Ant. Oravit sanctus Ipolitus

{1136}
Prime

Terce

Sext

None

Feast of St. Hipploitus on Sunday
First Vespers

Matins

{1137}
Second Vespers

Memorial of St. Eusebius
Prayer. Deus qui nos annua beati Eusebii

{1138}
August 14: Saint Eusebius
(d. c. 357, Rome)

{1140}
Sunday in the Octave of the Holy Name
Lessons. Non latet vos, dilectissimi Deo

{1143}
August 8: Saint Ciriacus and Companions, Martrys
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(d. c. 303, Rome)
With the introduction of the Feast of the Holy Name with Octave, this feast becomes a memorial, except where Ciriacus is the patron (which is not likely in England).

Of the Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir
Prayer. Deus qui nos annua beati Ciriaci

Matins
Lessons. Dioclecianus Augustus comprehendi

{1145}
August 9: Saint Romanus, Martry
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(d. 258, Rome)
With the introduction of the Feast of the Holy Name with Octave, this feast becomes a memorial, except where Romanus is the patron (which is not likely in England).

Of the Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir

Vespers
Ant. Dixit Romanus ad beatum Laurentium

Matins
Lessons. Cum fuisset beatus Laurentius

August 10
Of the Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir

{1147}
August 11: Saint Tiburtius, Martry
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(3rd. c., Rome)
With the introduction of the Feast of the Holy Name with Octave, this feast becomes a memorial, except where Tiburtius is the patron (which is not likely in England).

Of the Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir
Vespers
Ant. Inclytus martyr Tyburtius

Prayer. Beati Tyburtii martyris

{1146}
Matins
Lessons. Beatus Tyburtius eruditus

{1149}
Middle Lessons of St. Laurence. Eo tempore, accepta potestate

August 12
The Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir

August 13
Of the Octave of the Name of Jesus with Rulers of the Choir

August 14: The Octave of the Name of Jesus
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three; Rulers of the Choir

Memorial of St. Eusebius
Prayer. Deus qui nos annua beati Eusebii

Lessons. Confitentibus hoc salutiferum

{1153}
Middle Lessons of St. Eusebius. Tempore quo Liberius de exilio

{1154}
Homily of diverse tracts. neque enim querere est Christianis

{1157}
August 15: The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Principal Double Feast
The image illustrates the story that the apostles were miraculously transported to Mary’s death-bed to witness her passing.

{1159}
Ant. Qualis est dilectus
This Antiphon appears in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1161}
Hymn. O quam glorifica

{1163}
Ant. Ascendit Christus super celos
This Antiphon appears in only seven non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1167}
Lessons: [Pseudo] Jerome’s Letter to Paula (the Elder) and Eustochium.  This text continues through the octave of the Assumption.

See S. Hieronymi Operum Mantissa, ep.9, I, II, PL30, c.122-124.

St. Paula  (347 – 404); Saint Eustochium Julia (ca. 368 – September 28, 419 or 420) was the daughter of Saint Paula.

The authenticity of this letter is in question, and is often attributed to ‘Pseudo-Jerome’ and dated to the ninth century.  According to Fiona J. Griffiths, Nuns’ Priests’ Tales: Men and Salvation in Medieval Women’s Monastic Life (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018): 90, the Letter was written by Paschasius Radbertus, Abbot of Corbie(785–865).

This reading was used very widely for the Feast of the Assumption, up to the reform of the roman Breviary in 1568.

See also Hannah W. Matis, ‘The Seclusion of Eustochium: Paschasius Radbertus and the Nuns of Soissons‘, Church History, LXXXV-4 (December 2016): 665-689.

Another (partial) translation appears at Medieval Women’s Latin Letters.

Another translation, together with a lengthy and informative introduction, appears in Ellen Muehlberger, ‘Cogitis me: A Medieval Sermon on the Assumption’. Master’s thesis, Indiana University, 2001.  ‘The doubt expressed in Radbert’s sermon had a dampening effect on the resolution of the question of bodily assumption in the West for centuries to come.’ (p. 18.)

{1177}
Homily of the Venerable Bede
Only Lesson 7 is from this Homily.
See J. A. Giles, Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede, V (London: Whittaker and Co., 1843), Homily XL.  295-306.

{1178}
Resp. Quam pulchra es amica mea
This Responsory appears in only six non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

Lessons 8-9.
These Lessons appear to be unique to the Sarum Rite.

{1181}
‘parnymphus’ see Jacobus de Voragine, Sermones aurei de Maria Virgine, sermon 73, fo. 89v; Aelred of Rievaulx, Opera omnia: Sermones I-XLVI, sermo 9, p. 74

{1188}
Resp. Post partum virgo
This Responsory appears in only six non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1189}
Resp. Speciosa facta es
This Responsory appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1190}
Resp. Candida virginitas
This Responsory appears in only five non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1190}
Sequence. Letabundus exultet fidelis
This Sequence appears in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1193}
Quotidie infra octavas

Hymn. Quem terra ponthus ethera
Text ascribed to Venantius Fortunatus (c. 530–c. 600/609), Bishop of Poitiers.
The Hymn ‘O gloriosa femina’ {267} is a continuation of this Hymn.

August 16
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 17
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 18
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 19
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 20
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 21
Of the Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

August 22
The Octave of the Assumption with Rulers of the Choir

{1223}
August 23: Saints Timothy and Apollinaris
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(d. 290, Reims.)

{1224}
August 24: Saint Bartholomew
Inferior Double Feast

{1229}
August 27: Saint Ruphus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(died c. 295) Bishop of Capua, disciple of St Apollinaris of Ravenna.

{1231}
August 28: St. Augustine
Inferior Double Feast

(November 13, 354–August 28, 430), Bishop of Hippo Regius.
The Sarum Office is of nine lessons with all of the rest from the Common of Confessors.

The ‘Barwell’ Antiphoner, GB-Cu Mm.ii.9:501 ff., includes a full set of chants for this feast (see the Appendix). This source is in fact an Augustinian one, which accounts for the inclusion of the full office which is not part of the Sarum Use. The office is common to about 16 souces in CANTUS, although there is considerable variation in the precise contents.

{1238}
Ant. Misit Herodes rex
This Antiphon appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1239}
August 29: The Beheading of Saint John the Baptist
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.
This feast is said to mark either the martyrdom of John, or the finding of his head, or the translation of his head.

{1240}
Ant. Johannis baptista arguebat
This Antiphon appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1244}
Ant. Herodes enim metuebat
This Antiphon appears in only five non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

Ant. Audito eo multa faciebat
This Antiphon appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1246}
Resp. Petiis puella caput
This Responsory appears in only five non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1248}
Ant. Cumque introisset filia
This Antiphon appears in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1249}
Ant. Juravit Herodes puelle
This Antiphon appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

Ant. Ait puella matri sue
This Antiphon appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1257}
Ant. Accedentes discipuli
This Antiphon appears in only one non-Sarum sources in CANTUS, F-R 248.

{1259}
August 30: Saints Felix and Adauctus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. 303, Rome)

{1261}
August 31: Saint Cuthberga
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. ca. 718) Abbess of Wimbourne.

{1262}
September 1: Saint Giles
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(ca. 650-710), French hermit. Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense:xxix) suggests that this feast dates to the 12th. century.

{1264}

 

{1267}
September 4: Translation of Saint Cuthbert (see March 20)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons (or 3) with Invitatory sung by two.

(c. 634 – 20 March 687), Bishop of Lindisfarne, translated 999; translated to Durham Cathedral, 1104.

{1268}
September 5: Saint Bertin
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(c. 615–709) Abbot, Saint-Omer.

{1271}
September 8: The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin
Major Double Feast
The distinctive qualities of this Marian Feast stem from the liturgical content created at Chartres Cathedral at the time of Fulbert.  See Margot Fassler, The Virgin of Chartres : Making History Through Liturgy and the Arts (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010): 81 ff. and Margot Fassler, ‘Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert of Chartres, and the Stirps Jesse: Liturgical Innovation circa 1000 and Its Afterlife’ Speculum LXXV (2000):389-434.

The image is of the Stirps Jesse, the ‘Jesse Tree’.

Many of the chants are re-used (with adjustments) for the Feast of the Conception of the Blessed Virgin, (December 8).

Ant. Dei genitrix virgo
The Antiphons of First Vespers seem to have some connection to a modal order, three being in proper sequence: 1 2 7 4 8.

{1274}
Hymn. Ave maris stella
The Hymn is repeated from the Feast of the Annunciation (March 25).

{1277}
Ant. Hodie nata est beata virgo Maria
The Antiphons of Matins are in modal order.

{1279}
The image is again of the Jesse tree.

The Lessons are repeated (with some abbreviation) for the later Feast of the Conception of the Blessed Virgin, December 8.  Tr. WR. A translation of these Lessons is also found in Margot Fassler, ‘Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert of Chartres, and the Stirps Jesse: Liturgical Innovation circa 1000 and Its Afterlife’ Speculum LXXV (2000):389-434.

{1282}
Resp. Stirps Jesse.  Apparently composed at Chartres in the 11th c. see Margot Fassler, ‘Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert of Chartres, and the Stirps Jesse‘ Speculum LXXV (2000):418.
This Responsory is in hexameters.

{1288}
Resp. Ad nutum Domini. Apparently composed at Chartres in the 11th c. see Margot Fassler, ‘Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert of Chartres, and the Stirps Jesse‘ Speculum LXXV (2000):418.
This Responsory is in rhymed hexameters

{1290}
The Gospel Homily, attributed to Bede, is usually titled ‘Prefatio totius operis premisit’. Tr. WR.
In Zéphir-François-Cicéron Caron, Catalogue des manuscrits de la bibliothèque de la ville d’Arras (Arras: Courtin, 1860):390. This item is listed in a 12th c. manuscript originating in the Abbey of mont. St.-Eloi. of various sermons as following directly after ‘Sermo domini Fulberti Carnotensis episcopi : Approbate consuedinis est apud christianos.’ as ‘Lectionis ejusdem: Prefatio totius operis premisit de quo dicturus.’ This suggests that the latter is attributed to Fulbert of Chartres rather than to Bede, and thus connects these readings with the renovation of the feast at that place.

{1295}
Resp. Solem justicie. Apparently composed at Chartres in the 11th c. see Margot Fassler, ‘Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert of Chartres, and the Stirps Jesse‘ Speculum LXXV (2000):418.
This Responsory is in rhymed hexameters

{1304}
Resp. Speciosa facta es.
This Responsory is not commonly found in CANTUS, the only other source being GB-WO F-160.
It also appears in the York Breviary.

{1306}
Processional Chants in honour of the Virgin.
These chants were sung at the entry into the Quire following processions throughout the year.

Ave regina.
some sources ‘have ‘Gaude gloriosa’. LU:274. has ‘Gaude virgo gloriosa’. Ths standard CANTUS text is ‘Virgo gloriosa’.
This antiphon is in rhyme.

Alma redemptoris.
This antiphon is in hexameters:
Alma . . . celi /
Porta . . . cadneti /
Surgere . . . genuisti /

Natura . . . Genitorem /
Virgo . . . ore /
Sumens . . . miserere.

However the musical and grammatical structures suggest prose.

{1308}
Ant. Speciosa facta es
This Antiphon appears in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS, F-Pn n.a.lat. 1535, and I-AO 6.

{1311}
Daily during the octave

{1312}
Ant. Benedicta tu in mulieribus
It is unusual to have a separate set of matins antiphons for use during an octave. Typically the antiphons of the feast day would be re-used. It is apparent from the style that the antiphons on the feast day are in a more elaborate style, and that they most likely represent a newer layer; and that the antiphons for use during the octave represent an older layer that was originally used on the feast day itself.

September 9
Of the Octave of the Nativity of Mary with Rulers of the Choir

September 10
Of the Octave of the Nativity of Mary with Rulers of the Choir

September 11
Of the Octave of the Nativity of Mary with Rulers of the Choir

September 12
Of the Octave of the Nativity of Mary with Rulers of the Choir

September 13
Of the Octave of the Nativity of Mary with Rulers of the Choir

{1333}
September 14: Exaltation of the Holy Cross (see also May 3)
Minor Double Feast

{1335}
Hymn. Impleta sunt que concinit
This Hymn appears in CANTUS in five non-Sarum sources.
York use the hymn ‘Arbor decora.’

{1338}
Ant. O crux gloriosa
This processional antiphon is in rhyme.

{1356}
Resp. O crux gloriosa
This Responsory shares the same text as the Antiphon at First Vespers.

{1368}
September 15: The Octave of the Nativity of Blessed Mary
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.

{1372}
September 16: St. Edith (of Wilton)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(961-September 15, 984) daughter of King Edgar (ruled 959-975); associated with Dunstan. Following her death in 984, she became the patron saint of her community at Wilton Abbey in Wiltshire and churches were dedicated to her in Wiltshire and in other parts of Anglo-Saxon England. Her biography was written by Goscelin. Wilton, it should be noted, is in very close proximity to Salisbury.

{1377}
September 17: Saint Lambert
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(c. 636 – c. 700), Bishop of Maastricht (Tongeren) from about 670 until his death. His major shrine is at Liege.

{1379}
September 21: Saint Matthew
Inferior Double Feast

{1394}
Ant. Spiritu intelligentie
This Antiphon appears in only eight non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1405}
September 22: Saint Maurice and Companions
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Maurice (250, Thebes-287, Agaunum, Switzerland) was leader of the Theban Legion.

{1410}
September 23: Saint Tecla
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

First century follower of Paul the Apostole.

{1411}
September 25: Saint Firmin
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(c. 272, Pamplona-September 25 303, Amiens) First Bishop of Pamplona.

{1412}
September 26: Saints Cyprian and Justina
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. September 26, 304, Nicomedia)

{1413}
September 27: Saints Cosmas and Damian
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. ca. 287, Aegea, Syrai)

{1416}
September 29: St. Michael, Archangel
Inferior Double Feast

Ant. Excelsi Regis filium
This Antiphon is in metre and rhyme
This Antiphon appears in only four non-Sarum sources in CANTUS. It also appears in the York Breviary.

{1417}
Hymn. Tibi Christe splendor Patris
Text, Rabanus Maurus (c. 776-856).

{1420}
Invit. Cuncta agmina angelorum
This Invitatory appears in only eight non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.
This Invitatory is in rhyme and partially in metre.

{1443}
Resp. Ascendit fumus aromatum
This Responsory appears in only six non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1439}
Hymn. Christe sanctorum decus angelorum
Text, Rabanus Maurus (c. 776-856).

{1450}
September 30: Saint Jerome
Inferior Double Feast

(c.  347, Stridon, Dalmatia–September 30, 420, Bethlehem) priest, confessor, theologian, historian, Doctor of the Church.

{1456}
October 1: Saint Remigius
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Remigius (c. 437–January 13, 533) was Bishop of Reims and Apostle of the Franks.
October 1 commemorates the translation of his relics to the Abbey of Saint-Rémy in 1099.
Germanus (c. 380- July 31, 448, Ravenna) was Bishop of Auxerre. His remains were interred on October 1 at the Oratory of Saint Maurice, Auxerre. St. Germanus was the titular saint of many churches in England, including Selby Abbey. In the Roman Catholic Church his feast day is July 26.
Vedast (d. February 6, 539, Arras) was Bishop of Arras and Cambrai from 499. Vedast was venerated throughout Belgium as well as England (from the 10th century), where he was known as Saint Foster. The spread of his cult was aided by the presence of Augustinians from Arras in England in the 12th century. Three ancient churches in England (in London (St Vedast Foster Lane), Norwich, and Tathwell) were dedicated to him. In the Roman Catholic Church his feast day is February 6.
Bavo (622-659, Ghent) was a hermit.

Saint Leodegario
(c. 615–October 2, 679) Bishop of Autun.

{1457}
October 2: Thomas of Hereford
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(Thomas de Cantilupe) (c. 1218 – August 25, 1282) canonized 1320.
The Sarum Use does not include this saint, who is proper to the diocese of Hereford. The inclusion of proper lessons in the 1531 Breviary allows it to be used within the that diocese. This is surprising, seeing that Hereford had its own Use. In comparison, no provision is made in the Sarum books for feasts proper to York, which also had its own Use. The distinction is that Hereford (like Sarum) is within the province of Canterbury, whereas York is a separate province.

The traditional Sarum Kalendar includes on this date Saint Leodegar (Leger) (of Poitiers)
(c. 615 – October 2, 679), Bishop of Autun (659-679).

{1460}
October 6: Saint Faith
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Saint Faith of Conques (3rd-4th c.)

{1463}
October 7: Saints Mark, Marcellus, and Apuleius
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Mark (d. October 7, 336) Pope. While he is described as a martyr here, this does not appear to be the historical case.
Marcellus, and Apuleius (3rd-4th c.)

{1464}
October 9: St. Dionysius (Denis)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(b. Italy, d. 3rd. c. Montmartre) Bishop of Paris.
The Office of St. Dionysius is widespread and varied, with chants dating from the late 10th century. It was added to the Roman Calendar as late as the Breviarium of 1568, with only three lessons and no proper chants.

{1491}
October 10: Saint Gereon
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. ca. 304, Cologne)

{1492}
October 11: Saint Nicasius and Companions
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. ca. 285, Vexin)

{1495}
October 13: The Translation of Saint Edward, King and Confessor (Edward the Confessor) (see also January 5)
Inferior Double Feast

(1003 – January 5, 1066.), ruled 1042-1066. His cult developed in the 12th century, as Osbert, prior of Westminster Abbey, worked for Edward’s canonization, which was effected on February 7, 1161, and he was translated on October 13, 1163. Henry III constructed a new tomb in the rebuilt Westminster Abbey, into which Edward was translated, again on October 13, in 1269.
Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense, xxix) suggests 1222 as the commencement of liturgical devotion to Edward, but his Feast does not appear on the earlier Sarum Kalendars (see J. Wickham Legg, ed., The Sarum Missal (Oxford: Clarendon, 1916):xxx.)
See Frank Barlow, ed. The Life of King Edward Who Rests at Westminster attributed to a monk of Saint-Bertin (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992); Jerome Bertram, trans., Life of St. Edward the Confessor by St. Aelred of Rievaulx (Southampton: Saint Austin, 1990); Jane Patricia Freeland, trans., “The Life of Saint Edward, King and Confessor,” in Aelred of Rievaulx: The Historical Works, ed. Marsha L. Dutton (Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 2005): 123-243; and Jennifer N. Brown, “Translating Edward the Confessor: Feminism, Time, and Hagiography”, MFF lXIII-1 (2007): 46-57.

{1500}
October 14: Saint Callixtus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(Pope, ca. 218-223)

{1502}
October 15: Saint Vulfrannus (Wulfram)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(c. 640 – March 20, 703), Archbishop of Sens. His feast day is March 20. He was translated October 15, 1058, to the collegiate church of Our Lady in Abbeville, which was then re-dedicated in Wulfram’s name.

{1503}
October 16: St. Michael in Mount Tumba (see also September 29)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.

This Feast is not found in the York Kalendar.

{1511}
October 17: The Translation of Saint Etheldreda [Audrey] (see June 23)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(ca. 636–June 23, 679) Abbess of Ely. translated October 17, 1106. (Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense, xxix) suggests 1480 as the introduction of this feast.)

{1514}
October 18: Saint Luke
Inferior Double Feast

{1518}
Homily. Dominus et Salvator noster fratres charissimi
Homily 17, PL 1139.
trans. WR.
Another translation is available in Gregory the Great: Forty Gospel Homilies, (Cistercian Publications, 1990).

{1521}
October 19: The Deposition of Saint Frideswide
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(c. 650 – October 19, 727) abbess at Oxford; translated to to a new shrine, 1180.
(Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense, xxix) suggests 1480 as the introduction of this feast.)

{1525}
October 21: The Eleven Thousand Virgins
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense, xxix) suggests the 12th century as the introduction of this feast.)
The Breviary 1531 provides only a Prayer and three Lessons.
GB-Cu Mm.ii.9 and GB-AB 20541 E provide proper music for at least three lessons; The Sarum Antiphonale 1520 provides music for nine lessons. This is found in the Appendix.
In general the content of this feast is borrowed from Commons of Virgins.

{1537}
October 23: Saint Romanus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

(d. ca. 640) Bishop of Rouen.

{1538}
October 25: Saints Crispin and Crispinian
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. 286, Rome) Major shrine as Soissons.

The Memorial of John of Beverley is in reference to his translation on October 25.
‘On 16 December 1416 Henry ordered the Bishop on London to celebrate the feasts of all three saints [Crispin, Crispinian, and John] on 25 October each year, throughout his diocese and in perpetuity, in commemoration. . . . Similar instructions were issued throughout the South of England, indeed all parts of the country forming the Archdiocese of Canterbury.’ (Stephen Cooper, Agincourt: Myth and Reality 1415-2015 (Barnsley:Praetorian Press, 2014):131.

This memorial is referenced in the famous St. Crispin speech in Shakespeare’s Henry V, Act IV Scene iii 18–67.

The York Use has nine lessons for St. John.

{1541}
October 28: Saints Symon and Jude
Inferior Double Feast

{1546}
Homily: Merito magister bonus.
An English translation is available at New Advent: Fathers of the Church: Tractates on the Gospel of John (Augustine): Tractate 87 and Tractate 88.

{1549}
October 31: Saint Quentin
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Quentin of Amiens (d. ca. 287)

{1551}
November 1: All Saints
Major Double Feast
The image illustrate the four orders of saints, Apostles and Evangelists, Martyrs, Confessors, and Virgins.

The York Use has a Vigil of All Saints.

{1553}
Ant. Omnes electi Dei
This appears in only 6 non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1555}
Hymn: Jesu Salvator seculi
attr. Rabanus Maurus (776-856)

{1557}
Ant. Beati estis sancti Dei omnes
The Breviarium Romanum has ‘Angeli, archangeli’; the Dominican Breviaries (1492 and 1933) follow Sarum.

{1574}
Ant. Virgines sancte Dei
This Antiphon appears in only 4 non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

{1586}
Ant. Te gloriosus apostolorum chorus
This Antiphon is based upon the Cancticle ‘Te Deum’.

{1584}
Hymn. Christe Redemptor omnium.

Users may find the following a more practical English version of stanza 6: ‘From lands wherein thy faithful dwell, We pray thy people thrive and swell :” etc. (Courtesy of Jonathan Marler.)

{1588}
Resp. Justi in perpetuum vivent (Wisdom 5:16-17)
This Responsory is also found at First Vespers of Many Confessors out of Eastertide. The Vulgate has ‘cogitatio illorum’. This Responsory has a unique doxology text.
This Responsory is unique to Sarum in CANTUS.

There is a 5-part polyphonic setting by John Sheppard (c. 1515-1558), in which the Cantus firmus is in the cantus voice.

{1589}
Ant. Salvator mundi salva nos omnes
The Breviarium Romanum has ‘O quam gloriosum’; the Dominican Breviaries (1492 and 1933) follow Sarum.

{1591}
November 2: The Commemoration of the Dead
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

‘The Council of Oxford, 1222, declared All Souls’ Day a holy day of the second class, upon which only works of necessity were to be done.’ (Shakespere Wood, ‘All Souls’ Day and its Octave in Rome’, The Churchman LII (December 5, 1885):640.

{1601}
November 3: Saint Winifred
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

A 7th-century Welsh Saint, around whom many historical legends have formed.
In 1138, relics were carried to Shrewsbury to form the basis of an elaborate shrine.
(Walter Frere (Graduale Sarisburiense, xxix) suggests 1415 as the introduction of this feast.)

{1610}
November 6: Saint Leonard (of Noblac/Limoges)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(d. 599.)
In the 12th century, although there is no previous mention of Leonard either in literature, liturgy or in church dedications, his cult rapidly spread, at first through Frankish lands, following the release of Bohemond I of Antioch in 1103 from a Danishmend prison, where the successful diplomacy was inspired by Leonard of Noblac. In 1103 Bohemond I of Antioch visited the Abbey of Noblac, where he made an offering in gratitude for his release. Leonard’s cult spread through all of Western Europe: in England, 177 churches are dedicated to him.

The Penpont Antiphoner contains texts for proper Antiphons and Responsories. While staff lines have been drawn, no music is recorded.
CH-SGs 388 is the only other Cantus source for the Feast of Saint Leonard; it contains a completely different set of chants.
The York Breviary has 9 lessons, with the rest from the Common.

{1613}
November 8: The Holy Four Crowned Martyrs
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Four unknown martyrs, the names of whom were later learned to be Severus, Severianus, Carpophorus, and Victorinus, along with Claudius, Castorius, Symphorian, Nicostratus, and Simplicius, martyred between 287 and 305, are venerated on this day.

{1615}
November 9: Saint Theodore
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Theodore of Amasea (d. February 17 306)

This day would also be the Feast of the Icon of the Saviour. See the Psalter, [527].

{1617}
November 11: Saint Martin
Simple Feast of 9 Lesson with Invitatory sung by three.

(Sabaria ca. 316-November 8, 397, Candes) Bishop of Tours.

{1620}

The antiphons at Matins are attributed to Odo of Cluny, early 10th century.  They are the first nine of a set of twelve, the final three being Exequie Marine, Martinus signipotens, and O vere beatum.

{1654}
November 13: Saint Brice
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(c. 370 – 444 AD), Bishop of Tours, succeeding Martin of Tours in 397.

{1657}
Ant. Post excessum
It is very unusual for an office to contain only proper antiphons for Lauds. However, among CANTUS sources this seems to be the norm for this feast.

{1665}
November 14: The Translation of Saint Erkenwald (See also April 30.)
9 Lessons

(d. 693) Bishop of London, 675 and 693.
The inclusion of the lessons for this non-Sarum feast in the Breviary 1531 makes the book suitable for use in the diocese of London.

{1671}
The Deposition of Saint Erkenwald (April 30)
Non Sarum

It is not clear as to why these lessons are printed at this point in the Breviary 1531, rather than with the other feasts of April {456}.

{1673}
November 15: Saint Machutus (Malo)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(520 – November 15, 621) founder of Saint-Malo, a commune in Brittany, France.

{1678}
November 16: Saint Edmund, Bishop and Confessor (See also June 9.)
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by three.

(1175–1240), from 1219 (or 1222) Treasurer of Salisbury Cathedral; from 1233(34), Archbishop of Canterbury. Edmund died while in France and was buried at Pontigny. Canonized 1246; translated into a more honorable sepulchre, June 9 1247.
See Wilfrid Wallace, Life of St. Edmund of Canterbury. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., 1893.

{1684}
November 17: Saint Hugh (of Lincoln), Bishop and Confessor
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(1135/40 – November 16, 1200) Bishop of Lincoln 1186-1200; canonised 1220.

November 18: The Octave of Saint Martin
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

{1695}
November 20: Saint Edmund, King and Martyr
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

(ca. 841 – November 20, 869) King of East Anglia (ca 855-869). translated into the new church at Bury St. Edmunds, April 29, 1095; November 23, 1198. In 1219 Edmund’s remains were forcibly translated to Saint Sernin, Toulouse.

GB-Cu Mm.ii.9:597 ff. contains a complete set of Antiphons and Responsories for this feast. See the Appendix.
Andrew Hughes dates this office to the late 11th century. It also exists in a monastic version. (See Andrew Hughes, ‘British Rhymed Offices’, Susan Rankin and David Hiley, eds, Music in the Medieval English Liturgy (Oxford: Clarendon, 1993): 260.)
This Office is discussed in Thomson, Rodney M. ‘The Music for the Office of St. Edmund King and Martyr’, Music & Letters 65 (1984):189-93. See also James Boniface MacKinlay, Saint Edmund, King and Martyr (London and Leamington: Art and Book Company, 1893).

Ant. Ave rex gentis Anglorum
This Antiphon is in metre and rhyme.  It appears in only two non-Sarum sources in CANTUS.

The same text and music (with appropriate changes) appears in the Antiphon ‘Ave prothomartyr Anglorum’ for St. Alban {544}.
See also Manfred E. Bukofzer, ‘Two fourteenth-century Motets on St. Edmund’, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Music (London: J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd,1951):17-33.

November 21 would be the Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin. See the Psalter, [555].

{1701}
November 22: Saint Cecilia
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.
(d. November 22, 230, Rome)

Sherry L. Reames, ‘The Office for Saint Cecilia’, Thomas J. Heffernan and E. Ann Matter, eds., The Liturgy of the Medieval Church (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2005): 219-241. gives an extensive description and analysis of the text of this office.

Ant. Triduanas a Domino (see Lesson 9)

Santa Cecilia in Travestere was founded, according to tradition, by St. Urban on the site of St. Cecilia’s house.  The placement of this antiphon at the beginning of the Office may be an indication that the Office was used for the anniversary of the dedication of this church.  However, in CANTUS this antiphon appears at this particular location in only two non-Sarum soruces, D-MZb D, and PL-Kkar 1 (Rkp 12).  In CANTUS sources it most commonly appears as the fifth of Lauds, a location that reflects its place at end of the narrative.

Ant. Virgo gloriosa (see Lesson 2)

This text also appears in Responsory 2

Gueranger, Life of Saint Cecilia: 55, citing St. Jerome and and St. John Chrysostom, notes the early Christian custom of carrying the Gospel concealed beneath clothing .

{1702}

Invit. Christum venerantes

This Invitatory appears also in the Common of Virgins, and on the Feast of St. Agatha.

This Invitatory appears in only three non-Sarum sources in CANTUS, F-CA 38, F-VAL 114, and PL-WRu R 503.

In the York Use this Invitatory uses the Venite of Mode II.

{1703}

Ant. 1. Cecilia virgo

This text also appears in Responsory 6.

Ant. 2. Expansis manibus

Ant. 3. Cilicio Cecilia

This text also appears in Responsories 2 and 6.

{1704}

Lessons. Beata Cecilia virgo clarissima
Trans. WR
Sherry L. Reames, ‘The Second Nun’s Prologue and Tale’, Robert M. Correale ed., Sources and Analogues of the Canterbury Tales, Vol. 1 (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2002): 516-52 gives a translation of ‘In festo Sancte Cecilie virginis et martyris’, Paris, Bib. Nat. ms. latin 3278, a late 13th c. manuscript that to a large extent similar to the Sarum text.

The lessons draw primarily on the anonymous Passio S. Cecilie, but are also at times closely related to the Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine. The original source is the anonymous In passione sancte Cecilie virginis, dating from the 5th century.  It appears in Jacobo Laderchio, S. Caeciliae virginis et martyri acta (Rome, 1723): 1-39.

See also Sherry L. Reames, ‘Mouvance and Interpretation in Late-Medieval Latin: The Legend of St. Cecilia in British Breviaries’, Tim William Machan, ed.,  Medieval Literature: Texts and Interpretation (Binghamton, New York:  Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1991): 159-189.

See also Prosper Gueranger, Life of Saint Cecilia (Philadelphia: Peter F. Cunningham, 1866).

‘Et cantantibus organis, illa in corde suo soli Domino decantabat . . .’ was the impetus for the adoption of St. Cecilia as the patroness of music and of the imagery of Cecilia playing the organ, both of which appear to have developed in the 16th. century.   However, the point here seems to be, in fact, that while the music was playing (at the wedding feast), Cecilia was, instead of joining in, rather, praying (singing in her heart) to God.  This is depicted in the following illumination:

Illumination in a manuscript (dated 1463) of Jean de Vignay’s French translation of Vincent de Beauvais, Speculum historiale, Bibliothèque Nationale, Fr. 51 (Le Mirouer Historial), fol. 8.

Here follows an early image of St. Cecilia playing the organ:

Anonymous 16th. c. oil on canvas (Wikimedia commons)

Tiburtius and Valerian (and Maximus) are commemorated on April 14, the day of their burial.

‘. . . ut non confundar.’, Ps. 118:80.

Resp. 1. Cantantibus organis (see Lesson 1)

This text also appears in Antiphon 4 of Matins, and in Antiphon 1 of Lauds.

{1706}

Resp. 2. Virgo gloriosa (see Lesson 1)

This text also appears in the Antiphon to Magnificat at First Vespers, Antiphon 3 of Matins, and Responsory 6.

[1707]

St. Urban: Pope Urban I  (175-230).  Urban is not commemorated in the Sarum Kalendar, but appears in the York and Roman Kalendar on May 25.  St. Urban appears in the Sarum Martyrology on May 25.

Resp. 3. Cecilia me misit (cf. Legenda aurea, line 45; see Lesson 4)

The text-form of this Responsory is unusual in that the Verse repeats text from the beginning.

{1708}
Ant. 4. Biduanis ac triduanis

This text also appears in Responsory 1.
This Antiphon appears in only one non-Sarum source in CANTUS, F-AS 893.

Ant. 5. Fiat Domine cor meum (see Lesson 1)

This text also appears in Responsory 1.

{1709}

Ant. 6. Domine Jesu Christe seminator (see Lesson 4)

This text also appears in Responsory 5.  This Antiphon shares the same melodic incipit with Responsory 5.

‘. . . Cecilia faumla tua quasi apes . . .’ Gueranger, Life of St. Cecilia: 68, points out that the ‘Acts of Saint Cecilia’ has ‘quasi ovis’ (like a lamb), and believes that the alteration, both here and in the Antiphon ‘Cecilia famula tua’, fifth of Lauds, dates from the ninth century.  ‘Bee’ may have been chosen as a symbol of chastity.

{1710}

Resp. 4. Beata Cecilia dixit

This text also appeas in Antiphon 7.

‘. . . Unus Dominus . . . et in omnibus nobis.’, Eph. 4:5-6. On account of these words, Gueranger, Life of St. Cecilia:69, declares the old man to be St. Paul.

{1711}
Resp. 5. Domine Jesu Christe (see Lesson 4)

This text also appears in  Antiphon 6.

This Responsory shares the same melodic incipit with Antiphon 6.

{1713}

A lacuna appears here in GB-Cu Mm.ii.9, the principal manuscript source used for the Antiphonale Sarisburiense. That manuscript continues with the fifth Antiphon of Lauds of the Common of Apostles.

Resp. 6. Cilicio Cecilia

This text also appears in Antiphons 1 and 3 of Matins, and in Responsory 2.

{1714}

Ant. 7. Beata Cecilia dixit (cf. Legenda aurea, line 91)

This text also appears in Responsory 4.

Ant. 8. Credimus Christum (see Lesson 8)

{1715}

Ant. 9. Nos scientes sanctum nomen (see Lesson 8)

The text originates in line 166 of the Passion of St. Cecilia.

{1716}

‘. . . Almachius . . .’, Turcius Almachius.

Resp. 7. Ceciliam intra cubiculum (see Lesson 5)

{1717}

‘Apparitores autem . . .’  The story in fact continues at this point with the martyrdom of Saints Valerian, Tiburtius, and Maximus, found on April 14, {445}.

{1718}

Resp. 8. O beata Cecilia

This text also appears at the Memorial of St. Cecilia (below).

{1719}

Resp. 9. Dum aurora finem daret (cf. Rom. 13:12; see the Lessons for Tiburtius and Valerian, April 14)

This text also appears in the Antiphon to the Benedictus.

{1720}

Ant. 1. Cantantibus organis (see Lesson 1)

This text also appears in Responsory 1.

Ant. 2. Est secretum Valeriane (see Lesson 2)

Ant. 3. Valerianus in cubiculo (see Lesson 5)

{1721}

Ant. 4. Benedico te Pater

Ant. 5. Ceciia famula tua (see Lesson 4)

Ant. Dum aurora finem daret (cf. Rom. 13:12; see the Lessons for Tiburtius and Valerian, April 14)

This text also appears in Responsory 9

{1724}
November 23: St. Clement
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Clement, Bishop of Rome 88-99.

Ant. Dedisti Domine habitaculum

{1725}

Memorial of St. Cecilia

Ant. O beata Cecilia

This text also appears in Responsory 8.

{1739}
November 24: Saint Grisogonus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Crysogonus (d. November 24, ca. 304, Aquileia)

{1741}
November 25: Saint Katherine
Simple Feast of 9 Lessons with Invitatory sung by two.

Katherine of Alexandria (ca. 287-November 25, 305).

Many of the chants of this office are in metre and rhyme. For the most part the chants are found in sources across Europe.

Ant. Ave virginum gemma Katherina
This Antiphon appears in only two non-Sarum sources. PL-KIk 1 and F-Pn lat. 15182.

{1747}
Lessons. Maxentius imperator
See also Jacobus de Voraigne, The Golden Legend, trans. William Granger Ryan (Princeton: Princeton Univeristy Press, 1993): 720-727.

{1770}
November 26: Saint Linus
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Bishop of Rome, ca. 67-76.
Although venerated on November 26 in the Sarum and York Uses, his name appears on September 23 in the Roman Martyrology.

{1771}
November 29: Saints Saturninus and Sisinnius
Simple Feast of 3 Lessons with Invitatory sung by one.

Saturninus, Priest in Rome and Sisinnius, Deacon in Rome, (both b. Carthaginia, d. Rome, c. 309) were sentenced to hard labor for their faith.
Saint Saturninus, Bishop of Toulouse (b. Patras, d. c. 257, Toulouse), is also venerated on this day.

Lessons. Beatus Saturninus
trans. WR.
See also Jacobus de Voraigne, The Golden Legend, trans. William Granger Ryan (Princeton: Princeton Univeristy Press, 1993): 728.

{1773}
Synodals and Provincials of the Diocese of Norwich
These items accommodate the Sarum liturgy to the Diocese of Norwich.

Saint David (see March 1)

Saint Chad (see March 2)

Saint Felicis
Felix of Burgundy, also known as Felix of Dunwich (b. Burgundy-d. March 8, 647 or 648), first Bishop of the East Angles. Feast Day March 8.

Translation of Saint Edmund, King (see November 20)
Presumably the Translation referred to here was that to the church at Bury St. Edmunds, April 29, 1095.

{1774}
Saint John, Bishop (see May 7)
This identification can be made to John of Beverley seeing that the Prayer is proper to this saint.

Saint Dominic
(1170, Caleruega-August 6, 1221, Bologna) Founder of the Order of Friars Preachers, also known as the Dominicans. Canonized, July 3, 1234; Feast Day August 4 (or 8) on account of the Feast of the Transfiguration. (See August 6).

Saint Francis
(1181 or 1182-October 3, 1226, Assisi) Founder of the men’s Order of Friars Minor, the women’s Order of Saint Clare, the Third Order of Saint Francis and the Custody of the Holy Land. Canonized July 16, 1228; Feast Day October 4. Seeing that Francis died in the evening of October 3, this could be reckoned as the beginning of October 4 (days being reckoned from sundown). (Compare St. Osmund, December 4.)